Adam Feeley

Quote of the Day

From Judith Collins and her transcript from the Chisholm Inquiry:

Ms Collins previously said she was “disappointed” at Mr Feeley over the champagne story, which came to light in September 2011.

She told the inquiry his actions were a “disaster” because they emerged two days before an important PR release on crime statistics.

“My crime stats, I say with absolutely no modesty whatsoever, were the best crime stats we had ever had. It was a really, really good news story.

“It was my shining glory, so the last thing we needed was leaks out of the Serious Fraud Office talking about champagne being used that wasn’t actually owned by the person who was using it. It was a disaster.” 

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Five Fingers Feeley under the spotlight again

Adam Feeley is under investigation by the Auditor-General for some whiffy dealings in Queenstown.

They must be whiffy if the A-G is looking at them… it will interesting to see how they pan out.

Queenstown Lakes District Council boss Adam Feeley is facing an Auditor-General probe into how he and the local government body managed his family’s land being considered for a special housing area.

Feeley, who is former chief executive of the Serious Fraud Office, wasn’t immediately available for comment.

The office of Auditor-General, Lyn Provost, has received numerous requests from locals requesting an inquiry into Feeley’s interest in land owned by his family being considered for a special housing area.

This includes any involvement the former fraud buster had in developing the housing accord and council policy prior to declaring an interest.

Last October the Council reached a housing accord with the Government that aimed to boost housing supply and affordability in the Lakes District area.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Sorry seems to be the hardest word

Demanding politicians apologise can get rather cringeworthy at times, they can wind up being almost like the apology Father Jack Hackett gave to Bishop Brennan.

But Labour is focussing now on the fact that the only apology, such as it was, issued by John Key last year was to me.

Why they OIA’d that is beyond me…what a waste of time.

John Key delivered just a solitary written apology in 2014, ironically to one of New Zealand’s most controversial political figures.

According to Key “to the best of my recollection”, the prime minister wrote just one letter of apology this year, parliamentary questions asked by the Labour Party show.

Perhaps ironically, that single apology was delivered to Cameron Slater, the WhaleOil blogger who largely supports National but has brought much controversy upon the Government.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

NBR Poll shows all PR people are professional liars

A recent online survey by NBR shows that people can’t be fooled by prissy press releases and smooth talking tosspots…we seem to know they are professional liars.

And the association of professional liars is all upset about it too.

New Zealand’s public relations body, PRINZ, is sour about the result of a recent NBR subscriber poll.

In a press release, PRINZ president Bruce Fraser took a potshot at the messenger, an NBR reporter.

“President Bruce Fraser has taken issue with an NBR reporter’s view that subscribers don’t believe public relations professionals are simply balancing out media and public commentary on contentious issues,” it says.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Chaos & Mayhem is never going to stop

Carrick Graham, "gunning for" his opponents

Carrick Graham, “gunning for” his opponents

My mate Carrick Graham has broken his silence and spoken to the Herald on Sunday about Chaos & Mayhem.

You might note that Chaos And Mayhem spells CAM. I’ll even break my policy of not linking to the Herald.

The PR supremo whose employment of attack bloggers was exposed in Dirty Politics says his unconventional media strategies are here to stay.

A defiant Carrick Graham broke his silence over Dirty Politics, which led to the resignation, and exoneration this week, of Judith Collins over allegations she had undermined former SFO boss Adam Feeley.

An inquiry found Graham played third fiddle in the attacks on Feeley, behind his “out-of-control” cohorts Cameron Slater and Cathy Odgers.

But Graham told the Herald on Sunday this week he was simply trying to turn the tide of overwhelmingly negative coverage against his client Mark Hotchin, former Hanover boss.

And he dismissed concerns raised by the Public Relations Institute of New Zealand about the questionable ethics of his radical tactics.

“I don’t think it surprises anyone that when they read the paper in the morning or watch the news, there is someone pushing an agenda somewhere.

Whether it’s PR people, MPs, officials, or even the media themselves.

“I don’t want to burst anyone’s bubbles by pretending that the world is black and white. Some people don’t communicate very well, and the tide turns against them, and that’s where I come in.”

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Who else is big business going to back Fran?

Poor bitter old Ms. O’Sullivan, she has gone from defaming me and Cactus Kate to treating us like Voldemort in her latest column.

Now she is just spraying poop everywhere like a mad old bint. Not for her to discuss the slamming of her and her employers in the Chisholm report…oh no…instead she comes up with a crazy conspiracy theory that big business has gone cold on John Key because he talks to bloggers.

Who has she been consulting? The payroll clerk at Fonterra, or the person she sends invoices to at the Business Initiative?

Key needs to reflect. The Herald’s Mood of the Boardroom Election survey of CEOs found that 62 per cent felt “Brand Key” had been damaged by the Nicky Hager revelations, 66 per cent believed it exposed an unhealthy relationship between politicians and bloggers and 76 per cent of those surveyed raised issues of political probity concerning Judith Collins.

They wanted him to learn the lessons from the Dirty Politics scandal.

Really? Sounds like those business leaders need a remedial lesson in politics…did any of them notice the result of the election? Did Fran?

Dirty Politics won the election for John Key, not the other way around.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Chisholm Report: The Lies and Smears of Fran O’Sullivan Part II

Following on from Part I is examination of Fran O’Sullivan’s now infamously silly second column about witnesses yet to even be interviewed titled “We need to know who tried to fit up SFO Boss” where she writes:

I believe he could start by requiring Odgers, Graham and Slater to say just who paid them for apparently trying to fit up Feeley.

And why they obliged.

Here is what Justice Chisholm said – Mark Hotchin did not pay for anyone to “fit up Feeley”:

Screen Shot 2014-11-26 at 12.02.03 am Read more »

Chisholm Inquiry – Four Answered Questions For Matt Nippert

Matt Nippert is keen to keep flogging the dead horse that is the Chisholm Inquiry.  He asks four questions that he thinks are unanswered. No one outside the small selection on the Beltway could possibly care about this heading into the second 24 hours but…

Here at Whaleoil we are particularly keen to help the infirm, bewildered and lazy so will answer them for Matty.

1. Who didn’t the Inquiry hear from?

Hong Kong-based blogger Cathy Odgers, ruled by Chisholm to have been part of a campaign to undermine Adam Feeley, was allowed to provide a “very detailed” written declaration in lieu of interview.

And former Hanover boss Mark Hotchin, despite his offer to talk from overseas via video link, was also not interviewed. At the time of the email the SFO was investigating Hanover, and the investigation was eventually dropped with no charges laid.

Cactus provided a voluntary highly detailed 7,500 word statement to the Inquiry.  She never at law even had to do that because she was never forced to appear at the Inquiry.  Justice Chisholm accepted all of her statement as evidence.  The fact that Fran O’Sullivan called Justice Chisholm in her slag column a “respected” High Court Judge should mean that his accepting of Cactus’ evidence should be the end of it.  Cactus wasn’t called to the Inquiry formally for an interview most likely because O’Sullivan had already tainted the Inquiry with her vile attacks on three witnesses to it as soon as she could reach a keyboard.  Mark Hotchin wasn’t called to the Inquiry because Justice Chisholm already had all the information he needed to draw a conclusion.  Along with Judith Collins he was completely exonerated in the Inquiry.

2. What information wasn’t considered?

“The absence of telephone records for Mr Slater’s calls is surprising given that both Ms Collins and Mr Slater confirmed that they phoned each other often,” Justice Chisholm said.

So here we have a journalist questioning a “respected” High Court Judge after the Judge has gone to the effort of conducting a very extensive Inquiry, breached  privacy to gain evidence and Nippert thinks that this isn’t good enough after 99 pages?  If Justice Chisholm was unhappy with the evidence he obtained then he damn well would have asked for more. He wasn’t the sort of man who would have held back and the painful length of his interviews proved that.  The Inquiry was already intrusive enough anyone staying awake long enough to read the report should see that.    Read more »

Chisholm Inquiry – New Zealand Herald Undermine Themselves

Screenshot 2014-11-25 16.47.40

 

There has been some conjecture among the so called elite of the media regarding the “alleged Gapes smear”.  The report covered off this and a footnote at 42.

Screenshot 2014-11-25 16.50.09

What Fran O’Sullivan and Matt Nippert do not realise is that Cactus Kate has already answered this in the Inquiry even though it is beyond the terms of reference of the inquiry.  They would like to think that Mark Hotchin (completely exonerated in the Chisholm report) paid to “stitch up” not only Adam Feeley but a serious charge of influencing a witness. He did no such thing.   Read more »

Yes you were, and I’m sorry

I have privately apologised to Judith Collins some time ago.

But Judith Collins has come out today to say she was let down.

She was, by me…and as she knows I am sorry about all that transpired.

But I now say publicly what I have said to her privately.

National MP Judith Collins says she is “very pleased” by what she described as a thorough inquiry, after a report into Dirty Politics allegations found no evidence the former justice minister acted inappropriately.

But says she’s been “let down”.

Ms Collins resigned her ministerial portfolios in the lead-up to this year’s election after an email emerged that appeared to link her to a blog campaign to undermine former Serious Fraud Office boss Adam Feeley.

Prime Minister John Key initiated a government inquiry into the matter, headed by High Court judge Justice Lester Chisholm.

The inquiry found that while Ms Collins had provided information about Mr Feeley to WhaleOil blogger Cameron Slater, “there was nothing improper about the provision of this information”.

Ms Collins said it was up to the Prime Minister whether she was ever reinstated as a Minister.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.