Alexander Gillespie

New Zealand Media accused of anti-Israel bias

Despite some people claiming that our coverage of UN Resolution 2334 was a beltway issue of little importance to New Zealand the New Zealand mainstream media eventually decided to cover it. Over the past three weeks, the New Zealand Herald published in total 46 articles, letters and opinion pieces on UN Resolution 2334. It was good that they covered it so well but was their coverage balanced? According to an article on honestreporting.com, it wasn’t. Twenty-three items were for the resolution, fourteen were against and nine were neutral.

Mainstream New Zealand media published some opinion pieces which drew attention to the imbalance and faults of UNSC Resolution 2334 and gave some historical context for the Arab Palestinian/Israel conflict. The unusual alliance with the undemocratic nations of Malaysia, Senegal, and Venezuela to sponsor Resolution 2334 led to serious questions within New Zealand and abroad.

A diplomatic crisis with Israel ensued…

…Some commentators have crossed the line from legitimate criticism of Israel into anti-Semitism or straight-out lies. Below are a selection of the worst offenders, in chronological order. This is by no means an exhaustive list of the ignorant and hateful writing we have seen.

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Expect more ISIS prosecutions in New Zealand, says Waikato academic

Two Daesh sympathisers were convicted yesterday, and a university professor says we should expect more.

Waikato University law professor Alexander Gillespie said terrorism legislation did not apply because the men were not explicitly inciting anyone to violence or intending a bomb attack.

He suspected there would be more prosecutions to come.

“People need to be prepared that there’ll be more cases like this, that there is more support for radical extremists that we actually care to admit.

“It’s just that this is the first time that we’ve begun to see it quite clearly with regards to this kind of charge. I think where you find one you’ll find others.”

Federation of Islamic Associations president Hazim Arafeh condemned the men’s behaviour but said the videos and other IS material they had were not difficult to find.

“This material is provided on the internet, there’s nothing new about it. I sometimes from time to time come across it, unintentionally of course.

“But the problem is the behaviour that someone can develop upon watching this material. This is what could be a bit of concern. But so far I don’t think there is a great risk to the New Zealand society.”

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A more important referendum than the one for the flag

A Waikato law professor thinks that focussing on the flag when other pressing priorities exist is a wasted opportunity.

His preference was for a referendum on cannabis legalisation.

You are being offered the wrong referendum. The matter to be decided should not be the design of a flag on which 6000 people have made submissions, but the status of a law which 400,000 people feel inclined to break each year.

The question of whether crime should be reduced, taxes collected and liberty increased on par with comparable risks, has been the subject of referendums in Oregon, Colorado, Washington and Alaska. It is likely California, Arizona, Maine and Massachusetts will also in the near future legalise the recreational use of marijuana.

The current position in New Zealand is that marijuana should be prohibited as the risks are too high to allow the public to have regularised access to it. The evidence shows that the risks are real.

Nine per cent of all people who use marijuana become addicted. All users run the risk of short- or long-term impacts. Immediate use impairs reaction times and hinders concentration, significantly increasing the risk of accidents.

Longer-term risks, especially with people who have a genetic predisposition towards particular mental illnesses such as schizophrenia, are strongly negative. All of these risks will heighten as improved growing techniques produce increasingly powerful products.

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Liberal hand-wringing over Kiwi criminals in offshore jurisdictions

Watch as the clamour to try and bring our criminal scum back home to  face “justice” in New Zealand rather than the much harsher treatment they will get offshore.

One such person is this Anthony De Malmanche fellow.

The liberal panty-waists are all upset that he might face the death penalty. Well boohoo, only the congenitally stupid don;t know that in most Asian countries the penalty for smuggling drugs at the very minimum is a sound beating and a long time in prison or the worst, a death sentence.

i have little sympathy for them.

The crim-hugging panty-waists though think this is terrible and one such womble is Alexander Gillespie who is supposedly a professor of law at Waikato University (snigger).

He is having a moan that these criminals are hard done by.

Two recent incidents involve Kiwis allegedly involved in trafficking large amounts of methamphetamine. The men were caught in Indonesia and China. These are not cases of attractive females with relatively small amounts of marijuana which would cause debatable social damage.

These are people who, if convicted, will be found to be responsible for the destruction of the lives of hundreds of others. Indonesia and China have a strong interest in putting these individuals on trial. This is standard practice as each state jealously guards its laws to protect its citizens, society and principles.

Accordingly, when people are tried for crimes in foreign countries, it is no defence to say they are foreigners. As the recent debate over the Malaysian diplomat returned to the New Zealand judicial system has shown, the public expect the law to be applied regardless of nationality.

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