Alexis Tsipras

Greece is the latest country to give the European Union the finger

Jewish shop "Kopp & Joseph" in Nazi Germany

Jewish shop “Kopp & Joseph” in Nazi Germany

The European Union has dictated that all European Union countries must label as Jewish-made, all settlement goods to enable followers of the BDS movement to easily boycott them. Greece along with Hungary have refused to label the goods, but distressingly given Germany’s history, their?Foreign Ministry has announced that it will be abiding by the new EU labelling procedures.

How is it that a country so haunted by the holocaust that it is taking in millions of Muslim migrants out of guilt, ( ironically followers of a religion that hates Jews) is on the other hand once again labelling Jews ?in order to damage them economically?

Jews throughout Nazi-occupied Europe were forced to wear a badge in the form of a Yellow Star as a means of identification. This was not a new idea; ...

Jews throughout Nazi-occupied Europe were forced to wear a badge in the form of a Yellow Star as a means of identification. This was not a new idea; since medieval times many other societies had forced their Jewish citizens to wear badges to identify themselves. – bl.uk.com

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The people said no but their dodgy socialists government capitulated and said yes

You’ve got to love the wog politicians.

They egg on their population to say No in a referendum, which they then do. Then it seems they had no plans on what to do next because after two weeks of pressure the Greek government has?capitulated and gone against the No vote and said Yes to the EU.

Euro zone leaders made Greece surrender much of its sovereignty to outside supervision on Monday (Tuesday NZ Time) in return for agreeing to talks on an ?86 billion bailout to keep the near-bankrupt country in the single currency.

The terms imposed by international lenders led by Germany in all-night talks at an emergency summit obliged leftist Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras to abandon promises of ending austerity and could fracture his government and cause an outcry in Greece.

“Clearly the Europe of austerity has won,” Greece’s Reform Minister George Katrougalos said.

“Either we are going to accept these draconian measures or it is the sudden death of our economy through the continuation of the closure of the banks. So it is an agreement that is practically forced upon us,” he told BBC radio.

Greece however aims to reopen its banks on Thursday, bankers said. Facing a wave of withdrawals, the banks closed two weeks ago.

If the summit on Greece’s third bailout had failed, Athens would have been staring into an economic abyss with its banks on the brink of collapse and the prospect of having to print a parallel currency and exit the euro. ? Read more »

Kraut pushback against doing deal to help dodgy socialist Greek ratbags

Angela Merkel is in a spot of bother for daring to entertain bailing out the dodgy, socialist Greek ratbags for a third time.

Germany?s ruling coalition appears to be deeply split over Greece?s latest reform proposals ahead of a climactic meeting of EU leaders at the weekend.

While senior Social Democrats (SPD), the junior partners in Chancellor Angela Merkel?s government, welcomed the list of concessions from the Greek prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, members of her own conservative bloc were scathing about Greece?s position.

As financial experts digested the plan from Athens, the joint chief executive of Berlin?s stock exchange, Artur Fischer, said that business leaders in Germany felt Greece had squandered its credibility, and that if Merkel agreed to a third bailout for Greece, she could also be signing up to the continuation of the crisis for years to come, thereby risking her chancellorship.

?This is the toughest time in her chancellorship so far. Can she resist the voices of opposition within her own party to push through a third bailout in the Bundestag that most of them are against?? said Fischer.

Understanding Greek bludgers and their attitude

Andrew Bolt finds the perfect metaphor for Greece’s problems:

Greece?s former finance minister, Yanis Varoufakis, says family obligations will keep him away from Friday night?s parliament session to debate the government?s proposed reforms in return for a third bailout?

Varoufakis tweeted that he would be spending the weekend with his daughter before she returns to Australia, where she lives. He sent parliament a letter saying he was voting in favor of the motion.

A Leftist paid a state salary skips work. He farewells his daughter to safety abroad as he votes to load Greece with more debt.

That really says it all. ? Read more »

Chris Trotter’s politically incoherent rant about Greece

Chris Trotter can usually be relied on to give a sensible opinion on most political matters, though occasionally he loses himself in an orgy of self congratulation when it appears someone can claim ?Capitalism doesn?t Work?.

Chris’ delusions about capitalism and the Greek Crisis have come to a head with a piece where he welcomes the bludging Greek ratbags voting not to pay their debts.

He usually gets the diagnosis right, but doesn’t always get the treatment right.

THE UNFOLDING CRISIS?in Greece has stripped Neoliberalism of its protective disguise and the world is recoiling from its ugliness. In normal circumstances the true purposes of the world?s neoliberal elites are masked by their use of opaque economic jargon. In the case of Greece, however, the social science of economics has been turned against them by some of its most impressive exponents. Nobel laureates Joseph Stiglitz and Paul Krugman have told the world that what is being done to Greece has nothing to do with economics, and everything to do with politics. A whole country is being driven to the wall in a desperate bid to destroy its left-wing government. Neoliberalism simply cannot allow the Greek Prime Minister?s, Alexis Tsipras?s, powerful lessons in democracy to go unpunished. If his Syriza Party is allowed to defeat austerity in Greece, what is there to prevent Podemos from defeating it in Spain? Or Sinn Fein in Ireland?

Yes Chris, it is all to do with politics, although those from the Austrian or Chicago schools of economics might disagree with well known left-wingers and Keynsians, Stigliz and Krugman. The politics is pretty easy to understand, especially if you take a step back from the ideology of a looney left Greek government who says ?We won?t pay you?.

Germany?s 72-year-old Finance Minister, Wolfgang Schauble, has clearly been unable to cope with his 54-year-old Greek counterpart, Yanis Varoufakis. Everything about the free-wheeling Greek economics professor offends the unyielding German ideologue. Varoufakis has been unsparing in his criticism of Germany?s inability to grasp the necessity for Greek debt relief (which even the IMF now acknowledges). It?s an act of insubordination which Schauble and his colleagues are resolutely determined to punish. So unchallenged has neoliberalism?s ideological hegemony been since the collapse of Soviet-style socialism that it finds itself unable to adequately respond to Varoufakis?s neo-Keynesian populist critiques. Their greatest fear is that, like the little boy in the Hans Christian Andersen fairy tale, the Greek Finance Minister will draw the world?s attention to the fact that the neoliberal German Emperor is wearing no clothes.? Read more »

Will Greece be the last gasp of Marxist delusion?

The left wing are all enamoured that the dodgy Greek socialists flipped the bird at the EU.

They think this is cool and even Chris Trotter rolled out the “death of neo-liberalism” epithets.

It’s hogwash of course…neo-liberalism didn’t sink Greece, dodgy socialists drunk on other people’s money and lazy to boot sunk Greece.

Janet Daly explains in words even simple-minded socialists can understand.

Which of these do you find more repugnant: an autocratic European Union which is no longer bothering to conceal its intention to displace an elected government, or a shambolic clique of Left-wing fantasists who are propelling a country ? and its hapless population ? into economic ruin and political chaos?

It?s a tough call, isn?t it? Whatever happens in the Greek referendum on Sunday, it will not be the end of this pantomime. In fact, it is intended not to be the end, in spite of the Greek prime minister?s bizarre assertion last week that he could guarantee a deal would be made with the country?s creditors within 48 hours of a ?no? vote ? when, in fact, a ?no? vote would effectively guarantee the impossibility of making such a deal since the answer ?no? is a rejection of meaningful concessions to the creditors.

There is no point any longer in trying to make sense of this. It has gone beyond sense. It is now incomprehensible in the strict technical meaning of the word. The ?options? available are all catastrophic and delusional in varying degrees and combinations, and nobody is actually going to get to choose between them anyway ? at least, nobody in Greece. To the extent that they have had any involvement ? or culpability ? in this matter, the Greek people must come to terms with the consequences of electing Russell Brand to head their government. Voters do have some responsibility for the choices that they make. That is what distinguishes mature democracy from the students? union. But given the price that they are paying for that moment of mad frivolity, it seems harsh to condemn, especially as the prospect of fiscal rationality had already been ruined by the fecklessness of previous governments and external forces beyond their control.

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Why I have no sympathy for the socialist Greek ratbags

An article in?the?Daily Mail explains just why it is the Greeks have become broken arses…basically they are nation of corrupt bludgers.

Greece in teetering on the brink of ruin – and it is hard not to feel sympathy for the pensioners crying in the street and the mothers facing empty supermarket shelves.

Yet those reading a new book may find themselves feeling a little less compassionate towards the Greeks. It reveals an eye-popping catalogue of benefits scams and tax avoidance schemes that have robbed the public purse.

James Angelos’ The Full Catastrophe: Travels among the New Greek Ruins lays bare the corruption which filtered through all levels of society – from the islanders who pretended to be blind, to the families who forgot to register their parents’ death and the doctors who ‘earn’ just ?12,000 a year – yet live in Athens’ most exclusive neighbourhood.

It was the rumours of an ‘island of the blind’ which first bought Angelos, a journalist, to Greece in 2011.

He had heard that on Zakynthos, something like two per cent of the population were registered blind.

All was not quite how it seemed, however, and it transpired that 61 of the 680 ‘blind’ residents were quite happily driving around the island.

In fact, an astonishing 498 of those 680 were not blind at all – or even partially sighted.

But being ‘blind’ had its advantages – in particular, the ?724 paid in benefits once every two months, and a reduction in utility bills.

It was a scam which could be traced back to one ophthalmologist and one official, which was estimated to have cost the country ?9 million.

And, as Angelos discovered, it was only the tip of the iceberg.

How big is the problem of disability benefits fraud, Angelos asked the then-deputy health minister Markos Bolaris.

‘Very big,’ came the accurate, but short, reply.

Indeed, when those claiming disabilities were asked to present themselves at government offices so records could be updated, 36,000 failed to do so.

That translated to an immediate saving for the government of ?100m a year.

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The square heads are getting sick of dodgy Greek ratbags

Time is up for Greece, and the Krauts are utterly sick of them.

Berlin has delivered a blistering attack on Greece?s beleaguered radical prime minister, Alexis Tsipras, accusing him of lying to his own people and seeking scapegoats for the country?s misery everywhere but in his own ranks.

The German government dismissed desperate attempts by Athens to salvage some form of bailout, prompting Tsipras to hit back, accusing the country?s creditors of trying to ?blackmail? Greek voters with dire warnings that a vote against austerity in this weekend?s referendum would be a vote to leave the euro.

Tsipras referred to leaders of other eurozone nations as ?extremist conservative forces? and blamed them for the capital controls that have forced the banks to shut down and ration cash. ? Read more »

Krauts call time on Olive monkeys

The Krauts have had a guts full of Greek whinging and are calling time on their economic intransigence.

Greece was on the brink of economic meltdown as Germany looked poised to push the country out of the eurozone.

With Greece about to default on a 1.5 billion ($2.4 billion) debt repayment, senior German politicians warned “enough is enough”. The Greek debt negotiations collapsed after just 45 minutes, amid fears Athens is now heading towards financial catastrophe.

Despite condemnation from European leaders following the breakup of the talks, Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras, said: “We will patiently wait until creditors turn to realism.” He claimed the talks collapsed because European creditors wanted to slash Greek pensions and workers’ wages. Tsipras’ claims were immediately rejected by the European Commission. Guenther Oettinger, Germany’s EU Commissioner, said Europe should brace itself for a “state of emergency” in Greece from July 1 if Athens did not reach an agreement with its creditors. Sigmar Gabriel, the head of Germany’s Social Democrats, said time was running out for Tsipras’ Government. “Everywhere in Europe, the sentiment is growing that enough is enough.”

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Squareheads are screwing over the dodgy greek ratbags

The Germans are marching on the Greeks and their intransigence over repaying their loans stretches on.

The German government has raised the prospect of an in-out referendum to decide Greece?s fate in a sign that Europe?s largest creditor has begun to make contingency plans for a Greek exit from the euro.

Speaking ahead of a meeting of eurozone finance ministers inBrussels, Germany?s Wolfgang Schaeuble said a plebiscite on Greece?s euro membership could prove to be ?helpful? for the debt-stricken country and its creditors.

“If the Greek government thinks it must hold a referendum, then let it hold a referendum,” said Mr Schaeuble.

“That might even be a helpful measure for the Greek people to decide whether it is ready to accept what is necessary, or whether it wants something different.”

His comments represent something of a volte-face from Berlin, who famously quashed plans by then prime minister George Papandreou to hold a referendum in 2011. Both Germany and France threatened to withdraw financial aid for Greece if a referendum was held at the height of its debt crisis four years ago.

The president of the European parliament, German Martin Schulz chimed in with the tacit endorsement, saying a referendum was a ?possibility? but ultimately it would be up to the Greek government to decide.

Popular votes have not been the preferred course of action for European officials.

The people of the Netherlands and France voted to reject the EU Constitution in 2005, while Ireland also failed to initially ratify the Treaty of Lisbon in 2008.

Greek Prime Minister Alexis Tsipras campaigned to stay in the euro when his Leftist Syriza party stormed to power in late January. But after three months of fractious talks which have yielded little agreement, Greece stands on the brink of defaulting to its own people at the end of the month.

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