Aliens

Photo of the Day

Mysterious Death of Zigmund Adamski 

A mysterious disappearance, a body with strange burns, and an inexplicable substance that baffled scientists. Zigmund Adamski, a 56-year-old miner, went missing from his home in Tingley, near Wakefield in June 1980. He had gone out to do some shopping.

To Zigmund’s colleagues at Lofthouse Colliery, it was a complete mystery.

Five days after he disappeared, Zigmund’s body was discovered 20 miles from his home at a coal yard in Todmorden. Zigmund’s body was lying on top of a pile of coal. He was wearing a suit but his shirt, watch and wallet were missing.

On the back of his head, neck and shoulders were mysterious burns which attracted lots of attention. James Turnbull, the coroner who dealt with Zigmund’s death, says it’s the biggest mystery of his career.

The coroner was baffled because although Zigmund had been missing for five days, he only had one day’s growth of beard. He says, “The question of where he was before he died and what led to his death just could not be answered.” James also said a strange ointment that appeared to have been used on Zigmund’s burns could not be identified by forensic scientists.

Exhaustive checks failed to reveal any record of Zigmund having been treated at any hospital during his missing five days. It was at this point that questions began occurring, regarding the origin of this inexplicable ointment and who applied it to Zigmund. It was not just the usual investigators, the police and coroners, who were attracted to this case. One of the most famous UFOlogists of all time, also called Adamski offered his own amazing theories on the tragedy.

He believed aliens from outer space abducted the Yorkshire miner by mistake.

Read more »

Photo of the Day

The alien cult that hijacked British TV.

The Alien Cult That Hacked British TV

If an alien civilisation ever decided to contact the people of Earth, how would they do it?

Would they park their flying saucer out on the White House lawn or on top of the Beehive? Would they skip the pleasantries and hover their destroyers over the world’s major cities? Or, perhaps, would they send a message hidden in the returned signal of an old television broadcast?

Saturday, 26 November 1977 was a deeply cold night in England. The regional station Southern Television was just beginning its evening news bulletin and families across South-East England gathered together in their living rooms to watch the news. Children waited impatiently for Looney Tunes, which they knew would be shown directly after the news programme.

As Andrew Gardner read out news of the conflict in Rhodesia, a hissing, shuffling sound drowned out his voice. Suddenly, a booming voice addressed the startled viewers, as the screen still showed the oblivious newsreader reading through the day’s headlines. It was early in the evening, and a strange buzzing noise interrupted newscaster but only the audio was affected.

This is the voice of Vrillon, a representative of the Ashtar Galactic Command, speaking to you.

It was now ten past five in the evening. With the news report still continuing on the screen, the deep, oscillating voice continued with his message.

For many years you have seen us as lights in the skies.

We speak to you now in peace and wisdom as we have done to your brothers and sisters all over this, your planet Earth.

We come to warn you of the destiny of your race and your world so that you may communicate to your fellow beings the course you must take to avoid the disaster which threatens your world, and the beings on our worlds around you.

As the broadcaster continued to read the day’s news, unknowingly, the people at home received a message from someone who claimed to be a representative of the Ashtar Galactic Command. IBA engineers at Croydon, Surry did not hear the override, and at the main transmitter at Southhampton, Hants monitoring system, there was also no evidence of the takeover. A police spokesman said that the message was taken seriously:

“They were frightened and generally scared.”

The voice spoke slowly and deliberately, with a strange inward authority, calm, serene, never scolding.

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Photo Of The Day

Zsa 1

“Dahling”

“I don’t remember anyone’s name. How do you think the ‘Dahling’ thing got started?”

Believe it or not, Zsa Zsa Gabor is still alive. She turned 99 years old, on February 6th. She is still in her home in Bel Air. Her husband, Frederick Prinz van Anhalt, is only 72. This year marks the couple’s 30th wedding anniversary.

Frederick says that Zsa Zsa does have visitors from time to time.

It’s unclear how much Zsa Zsa understands, but at least she’s comfortable and well taken care of. It’s also unclear if she knows about the death of her only child, Francesca Hilton. Francesca fought with Frederick for years. Then she died just over a year ago– January 6, 2015– at age 67.

Zsa Zsa would barely recognize the world around her if she were really with it. All her friends are gone. Her famous sisters, Eva and Magda, are long gone, as their mother, Jolie Gabor.

The Diamonds, Money, Fur coats, the Brown Derby, good manners, they’re all gone, too. Maybe it’s best that she stay in bed.

Anyone who has lived to be almost 100 likely has a few outlandish tales to tell. At least, one hopes they have tales to tell; it’s simply too awful to think of someone living through ten decades without one adventure, one great passion, one scandal worthy of relating over and over again. What’s the point of living a long life, after all, if one can’t look back with some complacency and pleasure at the glorious, memorable mistakes one made along the way?

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Life Magazine The Monkey from Mars.

Photo: Life Magazine
The Monkey from Mars.

The Monkey from Mars

In 1953, three men managed to convince their town that it was being invaded by aliens using nothing more than a monkey, green food colouring, and a blowtorch. Their hoax was so convincing that they even managed to get the US Air Force involved. They did all this to settle a bet.

It was a hot night on July 8, 1953. Police officer Sherley Brown and his partner were doing a routine patrol down rural Bankhead highway near Austell, Georgia when up ahead they saw a pickup truck stopped in the middle of the road. They pulled over to investigate. What they found was the most unusual scene they would ever encounter during their entire careers as officers.

Three frightened young men — Ed Watters (a barber, reportedly 28, although he looks younger), Tom Wilson (a fellow barber, 20), and Arnold ‘Buddy’ Payne (a butcher, 19) — were waiting nervously by the side of the road. And lying there on the tarmac in front of the truck, illuminated by the vehicle’s headlights, was a bizarre two-foot tall creature that looked for all the world like a space alien.

Space aliens had been in the news a lot. Just the night before there had been multiple reports of a large, multicoloured, cone-shaped object flying overhead near Marietta, Georgia. But no one had ever produced a flesh-and-blood alien before.

The young men spilled out a strange tale. They said they’d been out in their truck “honky-tonking” around, when they came over a hill and suddenly found themselves careening towards a small flying saucer that was ‘glowing red all over.’ Three small aliens were outside the craft wandering up and down the highway. The young men said they jammed on their brakes, but couldn’t avoid hitting one of the aliens. The other two spacemen made it to the ship and blasted off, leaving circular scorch marks on the road that were still visible.

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Bill Clinton channels his inner Colin Craig

BillClintonWithAlien

Bill Clinton appears to be sharing information with Colin Craig:

Bill Clinton is intrigued by space aliens.

The former United States president appeared on Wednesday’s episode of “Jimmy Kimmel Live.” He ended up discussing, among other things, extraterrestrial life.

Clinton admitted that soon after becoming president, he had his aides research Area 51, the Nevada military facility, “to make sure there was no alien down there.” He was also interested in Roswell, N.M., the site of a reputed UFO sighting in 1947, which was celebrating its 50th anniversary during Clinton’s presidency.

“I had all the Roswell papers reviewed – everything,” he told Kimmel.

“If you saw that there were aliens there, would you tell us?” Kimmel asked.

“Yeah,” Clinton said, nodding.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Tuesday nightCap

Chestbursters. Gotta love’em

Chest-BursterThese days, it is all CGI.  Back then, it was bleeding edge tech-meets-art

Few images in film are as startling as that moment in “Alien” when the baby chestburster comes crawling out of of John Hurt’s torso in a spray of gore. It was so gripping, the slimy little parasite was brought back for the sequel, “Aliens.” Even better, it was created without the assistance of CGI.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Thursday nightCap

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Sunday nightCap

Thursday nightCap