Annette Sykes

Internet Party spending causes further embarrassment

Pam Corkery 2014

Kim Dotcom’s failed Internet Party has been dealt another humiliating blow.

Final election returns reveal $3.5 million was given to the Internet Party by Dotcom. It ended up getting 34,094 votes – that means Dotcom spent $102 per vote.

The election returns reveal the party’s explosive press secretary Pam Corkery was paid $15,000 for her 15 weeks’ work – that’s $1000 a week.

Party Leader Laila Harre was paid $66,000 – more than $4000 a week.
The party spent more than $1 million on election related advertising, including $122,000 for a YouTube parody of Prime Minister John Key and US President Barack Obama. It also spent $21,000 on T-shirts. Read more »

Hone got the money but he kept most of it in his pocket

Hone - At The Trough

In his return to the Electoral Commission Mr Harawira declared he received $105,000 in donations and spent just under $23,000.

Read more »

Why is it Kiwiblog has the best posts when Farrar is away?

Lifestyle, arts and travel blogger David Farrar is away again.

Kiwiblog has again reverted to a blog of David’s mid-life crisis and travels.

Not content with his own travel blogging, he also now has guest travel blog posts.

However he does have a guest post from Kiwi in America that is very good. Why is it Kiwiblog’s best posts are while he is away?

Regular readers of Kiwiblog will recall my lengthy essay posted on Easter Friday about the recent history of Labour; some of it based on my time as an activist there until the mid 90’s attempting to explain Labour’s present day conundrum.

In a nutshell it said that an attempt by the left of the party to seize permanent control of Labour after the massive post Rogernomics ructions under the leadership of Helen Clark, led to a gradual purging of activists from the centrist and right wings of the party. Clark, and her followers in the Head Office and regional hierarchies, ensured the selection of candidates in winnable electorate seats (and after the introduction of MMP, also the party list) that not only ensured she could topple then leader Mike Moore after the 1993 election but also cemented her power base inside Labour guaranteeing her an unchallenged 15 year reign as Labour’s leader. This handed power in the party to an increasingly narrow base of sector and interest groups such as academics, trade unions, progressive feminists and the rainbow coalition gradually driving out activists who were more likely to be white, male, socially conservative, small business owners and church going people of faith. After Labour’s 2008 election defeat, former members of the harder left New Labour Party, homeless after the dissolution of the Alliance, the demise of Anderton’s Progressives and the rise of the Greens, began to come back to Labour assisting in the movement of the party more to the left.

This trend culminated in the amendment to Labour’s Constitution at its 2012 Annual Conference giving 40% of the vote for Party Leader to the party membership and 20% to the affiliated unions leaving only 40% in the hands of the Parliamentary caucus. This new formula enabled David Cunliffe to win the first full leadership primary in 2013 despite having only minority support in caucus – the first time this had ever happened in Labour’s history. The result of his elevation to the leadership was Labour’s third successive and even more disastrous defeat.

When you drive out of the party its more centrist activists, you leave a vacuum that has been filled by harder left activists. When these same activists, alongside the more traditionally left wing trade union leadership, have control of the party’s candidate selections, its policy formation and now the election of its leader, over time you end up with a party, candidates and policies that no longer appeal to middle NZ and a party that is no longer the broad church it used to be. The party may be truer to its left wing principles but it now produces candidates, policies and campaigning rhetoric out of step with the aspirations of floating middle NZ voters that decide elections. National’s moderate centrist direction under John Key has become the natural repository for various key demographic groups that once used to strongly vote Labour and accordingly, Labour has ended up falling further behind National in each subsequent election post its 2008 defeat culminating in its second lowest vote this election since its formation in 1916!

Labour is now undertaking yet another review of why it was defeated and another likely more bruising leadership primary.

Read more »

All hopes on Hone as Maori Party set to clean out Sykes

te_ururoa_flavell_51d694e4cf

As the elder statesmen and women of the Maori Party fall by the wayside, and the Mana with it, it appears that it will be just time before the Maori Party becomes a footnote in New Zealand’s political history.

But not just yet, reports Michael Fox

The Maori Party’s future is looking more secure, according to the results of a new poll in co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell’s Waiariki electorate.

With the party performing poorly in all major political polls, well below the 5 per cent needed to enter Parliament without an electorate seat, its survival could rest on Flavell retaining the seat he has held since 2005.

Last night’s Maori Television Reid Research Poll of 500 voters showed 50 per cent of respondents would vote for Flavell if the election were held now. Read more »

Hooton on Cunliffe’s delicate dance

Matthew Hooton looks into the problems besetting Labour with their dance of the veils with his potential coalition partners.

David Cunliffe can only become prime minister if Hone Harawira wins Te Tai Tokerau and brings Laila Harré, Annette Sykes and John Minto into parliament with him.

At the same time, any overt endorsement by Mr Cunliffe of Mr Harawira would do more harm to Labour’s still-strong election chances than what John Key feared would happen to National were he to endorse Colin Craig’s Conservative Party.

These brute facts explain the extraordinary manoeuvring that is underway in Mr Harawira’s electorate, which spans Cape Reinga to West Auckland.

Labour’s candidate is Kelvin Davis, who has a number of disabilities in the eyes of modern Labour: male and not ashamed of it; married to a woman; three kids all to the same woman; assistant principal at a Catholic school; plays rugby; drinks beer; lives in the provinces; believes in work not welfare.

Unsurprisingly, he was given a place on Labour’s list that makes it impossible for him to return to parliament unless Labour wins an unlikely 29% of the party vote.

Kelvin Davis is in the one position many in politics hope their opposition is never in…that of having nothing to lose. If he doesn’t win Te Tai Tokerau then his political career is over, therefore he will use any and all tactics open to him.

As first revealed exclusively in the NBR last week, Mr Davis and his supporters are determined to win Te Tai Tokerau from someone whose angry and grievance-based politics they regard as anathema to Maori economic development.

They wanted to launch an innovative web-based campaign targeting Mr Harawira’s relationship with Kim Dotcom in order to raise funds for the election, but were thwarted by Labour’s general secretary, the far-left Tim Barnett, who argues both Labour and Internet-Mana are part of the same progressive movement.

Perhaps out of desperation, some of Mr Davis’ supporters even approached me, asking if I would organise a corporate fundraising lunch for their candidate, after hearing of a similar event for another Labour candidate I was associated with.

That was also put a stop to.

Read more »

Hooton on Labour’s skulduggery in Te Tai Tokerau

Matthew Hooton uses his NBR column to explain about David Cunliffe’s skullduggery in Te Tai Tokerau.

Less widely reported was Mr Key’s reference to the Maori Party. Like National voters in Epsom and Ohariu, the prime minister told those in the Maori electorates to back his support parties’ candidates.

This is a bit cheeky: National doesn’t run candidates in the Maori electorates because, theoretically, its policy is to abolish them (although it’s extremely doubtful Mr Key personally agrees, given his commitment to national reconciliation).

That’s why Mr Key’s nod to the Maori Party is so important. Under MMP, this election remains too close to call. For National to have a chance of a third term, Mr Key may well need Maori Party co-leader Te Ururoa Flavell to retain Waiariki. Even more important is the result in Hone Harawira’s Te Tai Tokerau electorate, which spans Cape Reinga to West Auckland.

Most commentators assume Mr Harawira is completely safe, especially now he has scored Kim Dotcom’s dosh. But that reveals they haven’t looked at the data very carefully.

Three years ago, Mr Harawira only sneaked back into parliament, beating Labour’s Kelvin Davis by a mere 1165 votes, 6% of those cast. Labour won the party vote easily, by 10%. For his part, Mr Harawira’s majority was well less than National’s party vote and also NZ First’s (see table below). Obviously, many National and NZ First voters backed the Maori Party’s candidate, while Green voters backed Mr Harawira.

Screen Shot 2014-08-01 at 11.54.01 am

This time, the Maori Party has Te Hira Paenga as its candidate. He would make an excellent MP. A father of five, he has post-graduate qualifications and is assistant principal at Hato Petera College. Whatever: he should fall on his taiaha.  Read more »

Rodney Hide on the Internet Mana joke

Rodney Hide laughs his moobs off about the Internet Mana Party:

I used to think politics was all about achieving good government. That proved invariably disappointing. These days, politics is no longer my responsibility. I’m happy if it just proves interesting.

That’s why I am for the Internet-Mana Party. They’re the best entertainment in years. If they were a parody they would be too improbable to be believed.

Maori nationalist Hone Harawira calls Pakeha the rudest of names and the wrong colour to date his daughter. But he’s jumped into bed with whiter-than-white Kim Dotcom.

Harawira trumpets Mana and His People but that’s not stopping him using his electorate to coat-tail Dotcom’s party into Parliament. His price? $3 million.

It’s easy to accuse Harawira of hypocrisy but he has a ready reply: it’s a lot of money. At $3m his double standard is good and high.

It isn’t just $3 million though, is it Hone?

Laila Harre wasn’t elected leader of the Internet Party. She was hired. She’s been selected and paid for by Dotcom. The former coffee picker for the Sandinistas is New Zealand’s first corporate-hire political leader.

A mate rang after Harre’s appointment splitting his sides, “All they need now is Pam Corkery”. Corkery was appointed press secretary that day.

Willie Jackson considered standing but wanted $250,000. That’s his price for standing up for his principles.

Read more »

Colin Espiner on Kim Dotcom and his marriage of convenience

Colin Espiner is snarky in his article…very snarky indeed.

Say what you like about the sacrifice of conscience for cash – a great big German spanner has just been flung into the machinery of this year’s election campaign.

I wasn’t going to write about Kim Dotcom’s vanity party again this week. It has had far more publicity in its short life than it deserves.

Plus, it seems that everywhere you look Dotcom is there. Giving evidence in the John Banks trial. Breaking up with his wife, Mona (on Twitter, of course). Fighting Hollywood over access to his millions. Calling on Prime Minister John Key to resign (again).

Shortly, it will be Dotcom in the dock as he fights extradition to the United States on fraud and racketeering charges. Forget Banks and buckets of mud – that hearing is going to be the trial of the year. So a bit of Dot-gone seemed like no bad thing.

And then suddenly, there he was in a civil union with the beneficent ghost from socialist Christmases past: Laila Harre.

And Colin Espiner thinks Laila Harre is the bee’s knees…or does he?

The media was expecting Dotcom’s Internet Party would announce a flake as its new leader. Or a complete moron. Either would have done just fine. We could have ridiculed them, and moved on to more important matters.

But Harre isn’t a flake. And she’s certainly no moron. She’s one of the most driven, persuasive and intelligent politicians I’ve met. I don’t know how Dotcom managed to put a ring on the darling of the Left but on the face of it, it’s a major coup.

The question, though, is for who?     Read more »

Pedro comes good, lashes Dotcom’s purchase of two political parties

I'm coming to steal your democracy

I’m coming to steal your democracy

I honestly didn’t think Patrick Gower had it in him, his campaigning recently has been awful to watch, but yesterday he came good with an epic rant of the similar proportions to his rants previously about rorts and dodgy deals.

So kudos to Pedro…he has come good.

The Hone-Dotcom-Laila political triangle is one of the dirtiest deals in New Zealand political history.

It is as dirty as National-Act in Epsom.

It is as dirty as the Key-Dunne deal in Ohariu.

Frankly, Lalia Harré made me feel sick today when she said “it’s time for New Zealanders to take back MMP”.

That’s because Laila Harré is wrecking MMP.

Hone Harawira is wrecking MMP.

And Kim Dotcom is wrecking MMP.

They are using Harawira’s seat and MMP’s “coat-tail” rule to get a back-door entry into Parliament.

It is a rort.  Read more »

We have a winner! The new leader of the Internet Party is… [ UPDATED ]

UPDATE

The actual leader is Laila Harre — the Alliance party lives!

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Annette Sykes.

Annette+Sykes+Hone+Harawira+Launches+New+Political+cQUS_vP0rjcl

Sykes is an advocate for Māori independence and a nuclear free, genetic engineering free independent Pacific. She was a Māori Party member but became a prominent member of the Mana Party in 2011. She was listed second on the Mana Party list for the 2011 election, as well as standing in the Waiariki electorate — Wikipedia

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