Anti-abortion

Is there a difference between forcing a woman to have an abortion and preventing her from having one?

This is a photo of a dad with his hands in a heart shape holding his 3 week old infants feet.

When people talk about the right to choose and say that they are Pro-choice they are only talking about one choice. The choice of stopping a beating heart, or the politically correct term, abortion or termination. When we talk about euthanasia or suicide we are talking about only one choice. The choice to end a life. No one walks around enjoying their life and says I made the choice to live today because in day to day life we don’t make a choice every day to not kill ourselves. We take life for granted. Being alive is situation normal for us. Death is abnormal. To take active steps to cause death is a choice but surely the right to choose includes the right to choose life?

Should the government, have the right to take away a woman’s right to choose life? In China, the right to choose life was taken away from Chinese mothers who were told they could only have one child. Those who ignored the law were forced to have abortions no matter how many months pregnant they were.

If we disagree with the government taking away a woman’s right to choose life should we disagree with the government taking away a woman’s right to choose death abortion?

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Free Speech wins, AUSA are still losers

Stuff.co.nz

Yesterday the AUSA tried to ban a group from campus because they didn’t like what they say. They contrived a vote…organised some treating…and lost:

Anti-abortion group ProLife has been allowed to stay as a club within the Auckland University Students’ Association despite complaints the group was harassing vulnerable students on campus.

The association had received two complaints about pamphlets containing “misinformed” health information on abortions being distributed by the group, and of students feeling harassed.

The association held a meeting yesterday to decide whether the group should be disaffiliated.

There was heated debate during the meeting, which attracted about 300 people, and students eventually voted 225 to 117 to allow the club to stay within the association.

ProLife New Zealand spokeswoman Rachel Wong disputed the club had done anything wrong in the first place.

She said the association failed to communicate with the club after receiving an “anonymous” and “unsubstantiated” email complaint.