Assault weapon

Pansy reporter needs to hand in man card

When reporters write about guns they are mostly wrong and sometimes they are very very wrong.

Take the ironically named Gersh Kuntzman from the NY Daily News. This little cupcake thinks AR15 rifles are?horrifying, menacing and very very loud, so loud one gave the princess “temporary PTSD”.

I’m not kidding.

Stelmach doesn?t think it should be easy. But he thinks it should be allowed. “Guns don’t kill people. The wrong people kill people,” Stelmach added. “We can’t blame the weapon.”

He loves the AR-15 for cops, soldiers, hunters and target shooters. ?It?s fun to shoot something like that,? he said.

Not in my hands. I?ve shot pistols before, but never something like an AR-15. Squeeze lightly on the trigger and the resulting explosion of firepower is humbling and deafening (even with ear protection). ?? Read more »

More bad news for Obama’s anti gun statisticians

The Worlds Best Gun Salesman won’t like this study, it doesn’t fit in with his agenda. Piers Morgan probably won’t like it much either, but then he has an answer for everything. Even when Brett Lee gives him a couple of broken ribs.

In what will certainly?be gun control advocates’ new least favorite study, Quinnipiac University?s Mark Gius found not only that states with restrictive concealed weapons laws had higher gun-related murder rates, but that assault weapons bans had no significant impact on murder rates at the state level.

The?study?by economist Mark Gius, published in?Applied Economics Letters, sought to ?determine the effects of state-level assault weapons bans and concealed weapons laws on state murder rates,? using extensive data from a thirty-year period, 1980-2009. In the abstract for the study, Gius sums up the findings:

Using data for the period 1980 to 2009 and controlling for state and year fixed effects, the results of the present study suggest that states with restrictions on the carrying of concealed weapons had higher gun-related murder rates than other states. It was also found that assault weapons bans did not significantly affect murder rates at the state level. These results suggest that restrictive concealed weapons laws may cause an increase in gun-related murders at the state level.

Gius notes that these results are consistent with previous research, specifically citing the work by John R. Lott and David B. Mustard.

No matter how much the screaming anti gun scaremongers want to have you think differently, this just solidifies that concealed carry is one of the best forms of deterrence. Fortunately it is not something that is needed in NZ, yet.

shieldyourself

http://www.bargainpawnandgun.com/

The Truth About Mental Illness and Guns

Periodically some left-wing arsehole will complain to Police about the fact that I have a firearms licence.

What thy neglect to understand is that in order to be declared a fit and proper person to own firearms you have to tell Police all about any medication or mental health issues. I have had to get a forensic psychiatrist to say everything is ok. It is.

In the US there is real push to look at removing access to firearms from people suffering mental illness. The thinking is wrong.

Check this video from Reason.TV

Read more »

Some facts about Guns and why liberals calling for control are wrong

Time for some real facts about guns and gun?control?in the wake of calls for assault rifle bans.

You will see why the liberal wankers who call for such things are completely wrongheaded.

Fifty-five million kids went to school on the day that 20 were massacred at Sandy Hook Elementary in Newtown, Connecticut. Even in the United States, therefore, the chances of a child?s dying in a school shooting are remote. As my friend Steven Pinker demonstrates in his monumental study of human violence,?The Better Angels of Our Nature, our perception of danger is easily distorted by rare events. Is gun violence increasing in the United States? No. But it certainly seems to be when one recalls recent atrocities in Newtown and Aurora. In fact, the overall rate of violent crime has fallen by 22 percent in the past decade (and 18 percent in the past five years).

We still have more guns and more gun violence than any other developed country, but the correlation between guns and violence in the United States is far from straightforward. Thirty percent of urban households have at least one firearm. This figure increases to 42 percent in the suburbs and 60 percent in the countryside. As one moves away from cities, therefore, the rate of gun ownership doubles. And yet gun violence is primarily a problem in cities. It is the people of Detroit, Oakland, Memphis, Little Rock, and Stockton who are at the greatest risk of being killed by guns.

Oh, more guns in the countryside but less gun crime…boy that’s inconvenient.

Read more »

Gun Control alone won’t work

Charles Krauthammer explains why gun control alone won’t work:

Every mass shooting has three elements: the killer, the weapon and the cultural climate. As soon as the shooting stops, partisans immediately pick their preferred root cause with corresponding pet panacea. Names are hurled, scapegoats paraded, prejudices vented. The argument goes nowhere.

It goes nowhere because no politician has the stones to actually call out American society for their ills. Krauthammer examines the role of gun control:

(1)?The Weapon

Within hours of?last week?s Newtown, Conn., massacre, the focus was the weapon and the demand was for new gun laws. Several prominent pro-gun Democrats remorsefully professed?new openness to gun control. Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.) is introducing a?new assault weapons ban. And the president emphasized guns and ammo above all else?in announcing the creation?of a new task force.

I have no problem in principle with gun control. Congress enacted (and I supported) an assault weapons ban in 1994. The problem was: It didn?t work. (So concluded?a University of Pennsylvania studycommissioned by the Justice Department.) The reason is simple. Unless you are prepared to confiscate all existing firearms, disarm the citizenry and repeal the Second Amendment, it?s almost impossible to craft a law that will be effective.

Feinstein?s law, for example,?would exempt 900 weapons. And that?s the least of the loopholes. Even the guns that are banned can be made legal with simple, minor modifications.

Most fatal, however, is the grandfathering of existing weapons and magazines. That?s one of the reasons the ?94 law failed. At the time, there were 1.5?million assault weapons in circulation and 25?million large-capacity (i.e., more than 10 bullets) magazines. A reservoir that immense can take 100 years to draw down.

Studies show gun control doesn’t work, and the logistics preclude grandfathering as a solution. What about the nutters themselves?

(2)?The Killer

Monsters shall always be with us, but in earlier days they did not roam free. As a psychiatrist in Massachusetts in the 1970s, I committed people ? often right out of the emergency room ? as a danger to themselves or to others. I never did so lightly, but I labored under none of the crushing bureaucratic and legal constraints that make involuntary commitment infinitely more difficult today.

Why do you think we have so many homeless? Destitution??Poverty?has?declinedsince the 1950s. The majority of those sleeping on grates are mentally ill. In the name of civil liberties, we let them die with their rights on.

A tiny percentage of the mentally ill become mass killers.?Just about everyone?around Tucson shooter Jared Loughner sensed he was mentally ill and dangerous. But in effect, he had to kill before he could be put away ? and (forcibly) treated.

Random mass killings were three times more common in the 2000s than in the 1980s, when gun laws were actually weaker. Yet a?2011 University of California at Berkeley study?found that states with strong civil commitment laws have about a one-third lower homicide rate.

Locking the nutters up would work but for the civil liberties weirdos.

(3)?The Culture

We live in an entertainment culture soaked in graphic, often sadistic, violence. Older folks find themselves stunned by what a desensitized youth finds routine, often amusing. It?s not just movies. Young men sit for hours pulling video-game triggers, mowing down human beings en masse without pain or consequence. And we profess shock when a small cadre of unstable, deeply deranged, dangerously isolated young men go out and enact the overlearned narrative.

That is a pretty good summary of the issues, and why the focus on gun control alone won;t stop the shootings.

If we?re serious about curtailing future Columbines and Newtowns, everything ? guns, commitment, culture ? must be on the table. It?s not hard for President Obama to call out the NRA. But will he call out the ACLU? And will he call out his Hollywood friends?

The irony is that over the last 30 years,?the U.S. homicide rate has declined?by 50 percent. Gun murders as well. We?re living not through an epidemic of gun violence but through a historic decline.

Except for these unfathomable mass murders. But these are infinitely more difficult to prevent. While law deters the rational, it has far less effect on the psychotic. The best we can do is to try to detain them, disarm them and discourage ?entertainment? that can intensify already murderous impulses.

But there?s a cost. Gun control impinges upon the Second Amendment; involuntary commitment impinges upon the liberty clause of the Fifth Amendment; curbing ?entertainment? violence impinges upon First Amendment free speech.

Interesting to know that the homicide has decreased as guns have increased…funny that…but then again it isn’t so funny if you know and understand that of you act like a prick in a society where guns are?prevalent?then you might just get capped for your troubles.

×