Atmospheric sciences

Good climate news that won’t make the NZ Herald

Remember that we are supposedly in a ‘death spiral’ of ever increasing severity of storms and climate events, that will eventually lead to our doom unless we DO something.

Usually that something is paying increased taxes, because taxing something stops it, right?

Unfortunately the facts and reality aren’t fitting the narrative…the ‘death spiral’ isn’t and the ever increasing numbers of severe storms’ haven’t happened either.

The U.S. lucked out again this year, as large-scale weather catastrophes ? including devastating and deadly hurricanes, tornadoes and wildfires ? were few and far between.

Not since Superstorm Sandy devastated the Northeast in 2012 has a single natural disaster cost the U.S. tens of billions in damage, according to a report released today by CoreLogic. Sandy cost the U.S. about $70 billion. ?? Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: Rolf Maeder. Lightning seen from Moran Point, Grand Canyon, Ariz August, 2013.

Photo: Rolf Maeder.
Lightning seen from Moran Point, Grand Canyon, Ariz August, 2013.

Lightning Storm in The Grand Canyon

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Where’s the warming? Politics not science driving climate change hysteria

The Daily Mail looks at what is driving the climate change debate, and it isn’t science:

For years, computer simulations have predicted that sea ice should be disappearing from the Poles.

Now, with the news that Antarctic sea-ice levels have hit new highs, comes yet another mishap to tarnish the credibility of climate science.

Climatologists base their doom-laden predictions of the Earth?s climate on computer simulations.

But these have long been the subject of ridicule because of their stunning failure to predict the pause in warming ? nearly 18 years long on some measures ? since the turn of the last century.

Not a single simulation has come close to mapping real life evidence…the science is wonky, at least in the models that predicted doom and destruction.

It?s the same with sea ice. We hear a great deal about the decline in Arctic sea ice, in line with or even ahead of predictions.

But why are environmentalists and scientists so much less? keen to discuss the long-term increase in the southern hemisphere?

In fact, across the globe, there are about one million square kilometres more sea ice than 35 years ago, which is when satellite measurements began.

It?s fair to say that this has been something of an embarrassment for climate modellers. But it doesn?t stop there.

Read more »

Map of the Day

Storm Tracks 1878-1887

A map from the U.S. weather Bureau of a portion of the northern hemisphere showing average tracks of cyclonic areas, by months and seasons, over the northern hemisphere, from 1878-1887. The map uses various line types to show the general storm tracks…

Bugger, all that extreme weather last year was…well..unextreme

Brazilian Typhoon

One of the thing apologists and promotors of global warming, or climate change or whatever they want to call it say when confronted with facts is to point at “increasing extreme weather events” and tell us rather apocalyptically that we can expect more.

Like most things they say those too are lies. I wonder how long before Kitchen and Cookware blogger Russell Brown, hate speech blogger and part time real estate agent Martyn Bradbury and our favourite arts and travel blogger David Farrar catch up. They are the real deniers now.

Time Magazine explains how the “extreme weather events” of 2013 were not even close to extreme.

Weather has been dominating the news cycle the past several days, as much of the U.S. has?suffered through record-breaking cold. But while it might seem as if we?ve all been sucked into a polar vortex of weather news, 2013 was punctuated by coverage of major natural disasters like?Supertyphoon Haiyan?in November,?massive floods?in?India?in June and the?Category 5 tornadoes?in Moore,?Oklahoma?in May. No wonder so many people felt that extreme weather?was on the rise.

Except that wasn?t the case?at least not in 2013. The reinsurance company Munich Re?came out?with its annual assessment of natural disasters, and found that 2013 was an unusually quiet year. Catastrophes like floods and storms claimed more than 20,000 lives around the world, and caused more than $125 billion in damages. While that?s clearly a lot?and the number of deaths from disasters rose over 2012?both figures are well below the 106,000 in deaths and $184 billion in losses that were experienced on average?over the past decade. Though the total number of loss-causing catastrophes?880?was above the average over the past 10 years, the damages in both financial and human terms was less. ?There was no large-scale natural catastrophe event in 2013,? said Carl Hedde, head of risk accumulation for Munich Re. ? Read more »

Saving the world from climate change actually contributes to more harm

So now it appears that actions taken to clean up air quality, partially in an effort to reduce the so-called effects of man-made climate change, have in fact contributed to far more destructive climate change in the form of deadly hurricanes.

Apparently air pollution was helping to cause more of the sun?s energy to be reflected back into space, calming down ocean temperatures and circulation patterns. Now that air quality is better, more of the energy is getting into the oceans and creating conditions favourable to hurricanes.

Is this the law of unintended consequences in action, a reminder that we?re actually far better off leaving mother nature to sort her own sh*t out, or both?

Hurricanes, referred to as “acts of God” by insurers and seen by others as harbingers of the effects of climate change, are becoming more common as an unexpected side-effect of efforts to reduce pollution, research indicates.? Read more »

Chart of the Day – Global Warming? Where?

The evidence is mounting that all the models the world claimed proved the science was settled have been nothing more than a fantasy.

Courtesy of John Christy, and based upon data from the?KNMI Climate Explorer, below is a comparison of 44 climate models versus the UAH and RSS satellite observations for global lower tropospheric temperature variations, for the period 1979-2012 from the satellites, and for 1975 ? 2025 for the models:

CMIP5-global-LT-vs-UAH-and-RSS Read more »

Awesome news on Climate Change

Looks like global warming has its benefits after all:

Human emissions of carbon dioxide will defer the next Ice Age, say scientists.

The last Ice Age ended about 11,500 years ago, and when the next one should begin has not been entirely clear.

Researchers used data on the Earth’s orbit and other things to find the historical warm interglacial period that looks most like the current one.

In the journal?Nature Geoscience, they write that the next Ice Age would begin within 1,500 years – but emissions have been so high that it will not.

“At current levels of CO2, even if emissions stopped now we’d probably have a long interglacial duration determined by whatever long-term processes could kick in and bring [atmospheric] CO2 down,” said Luke Skinner from Cambridge University.

Dr Skinner’s group – which also included scientists from University College London, the University of Florida and Norway’s Bergen University – calculates that the atmospheric concentration of CO2 would have to fall below about 240 parts per million (ppm) before the glaciation could begin.

The current level is around 390ppm.

Other research groups have shown that even if emissions were shut off instantly, concentrations would remain elevated for at least 1,000 years, with enough heat stored in the oceans potentially to cause significant melting of polar ice and sea level rise.

Great news, I’d rather be hot than have an ice age….funny thing is the warmist would rather we all freeze, not that I care anyway it is a whole 1500 years way.

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