Auckland Prison

Paremoremo prisoners stab Corrections staff. Will Corrections be fined for incompetence? Why not?

Where is Kelvin Davis?

He seems to be silent on some problems that have arisen in a Corrections run prison.

Three staff members from Auckland’s Paremoremo Prison have been assaulted by a group of five inmates.

The incident is believed to be a stabbing.

The officers involved escaped without life-threatening injuries; Northern Regional Commissioner Jeanette Burns said all staff were wearing stab proof vests and were assessed by medical staff on site.

“One staff member was taken to hospital for medical treatment. The other staff members were taken to a local accident and emergency clinic for medical treatment.   Read more »

Arthur Taylor wasting more time, energy and money

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Vexatious litigant and convicted violent offender Arthur Taylor is making a pest of himself in the courts yet again.

He’s spent 38 years behind bars and his convictions include a variety of crimes, including conspiring to deal in methamphetamine from prison, possession of morphine for supply, receiving, kidnapping, escaping from custody, possession for supply of cannabis and cannabis oil, and six firearms offences.

He has cost the taxpayer literally millions of dollars for his incarceration and also for his ongoing vexatious claims.

The Department of Corrections has been called out for breaking protocol by jailhouse lawyer Arthur Taylor. But it says it has since made changes to ensure prisoners receive their minimum entitlements.

Taylor filed multiple complaints to the Ombudsman, Professor Ron Paterson, claiming the prisoners in Auckland Prison’s East Division were not given the opportunity to spend one hour exercising in the open air, weather permitting, which they are entitled to under law.

Citing previous incidents and Supreme Court rulings, Taylor claimed it hadn’t deterred the prison from “continuing to deny prisoners from their one hour minimum entitlement”, and that “there needs to be accountability” for the practice continued for “such a long period” of time.   Read more »

Unravelling the spin of the Media party over Kawerau

The Media party went into full crim-hugging mode over the Kawerau shooting of four Police by Rhys Warren.

They pandered to the criminal’s scribble-faced family who were quoted endlessly in the media. It was full on anti-cop rhetoric ignoring the fact that their scumbag relative had just shot and severely wounded four police officers.

The mother stated:

He had been in trouble with the law previously, she said, but not for some time.

David Farrar asked “This week? This month?”

Well it turns out that “not for sometime” is less than two years ago. We know this because in 2014 he was a party to the proceeding against the government by prisoners over the removal of their right to vote.

procceding Read more »

Prisoner dies, outrage building…oh, hang on, it wasn’t at a Serco-run prison…stand down

A prisoner has died at Paremoremo:

A prisoner has died at Auckland Prison at Paremoremo this morning.

Auckland Prison prison director confirmed a prisoner was found unresponsive in his cell this morning while staff were conducting routine rounds.

Staff gave medical attention and emergency services were called however he was pronounced dead at the scene.

Preliminary indications are that the death was due to natural causes.    Read more »

‘Sick Nick’ unsupervised with female Corrections officers [UPDATED]

Nicholas Reekie

Nicholas Reekie

ONE OF the country’s worst sex offenders has been having unsupervised meetings behind closed doors with female prison officers – with one meeting sparking a callout from Auckland Prison’s Tactical Response Team after the guard raised the alarm.

Nicholas Reekie was sentenced to preventive detention after being found guilty in 2003 on 31 charges, including burglary, assault, indecent assault, abduction, sexual violation by unlawful sexual connection and rape involving four females aged 11 to 69.

Three of his victims were abducted for long periods and sexually abused.

The 69-year-old, snatched from her retirement unit, was held for 15 hours.

A young woman taken while walking along a street was held captive for 17 hours.

Reekie – who is not eligible for release until 2022 – is currently held in directed segregation at high-security Paremoremo Prison where he is on 23-hour-a-day lockdown and has no contact with other inmates, who refer to him as ‘Sick Nick’.

According to the Department of Corrections, directed segregation can only be used where a prisoner is considered a threat to other inmates, or presents an unnecessary disruption to the good order and safety of the prison.  Read more »

Scumbag inmate patches in to Killer Beez on Corrections watch

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DUMB, DUMBER, Dumbest.

That’s the long and short of this lunacy.

Notorious street gang the Killer Beez are apparently so hard up for members they’ve had to resort to recruiting a cold-blooded killer who’s despised more than most of the pedophiles under lock and key at Paremoremo.

‘Dumb’ or what?

The gang’s prized new acquisition is George Baker, the man who murdered teenager Liam Ashley back in 2006.

Baker was sentenced to at least 18 years for strangling and then stomping on the 17-year-old while the pair were being transported in a prison van in August 2006.

Baker said he attacked Ashley because he thought the boy was a ‘nark’.

Chubb, the security company that operated the van, were heavily criticised in the aftermath of the attack and less than a year later surrendered its contract with Corrections.

Since being convicted of murder, Baker has remained in the public spotlight after his involvement in a number of further violent incidents at Paremoremo Prison.  Read more »

Another suicide on Corrections watch

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ANOTHER INMATE has been found dead at maximum-security Paremoremo Prison – and again it’s on Corrections’ watch.

Just months after taking over the management of Mt Eden Corrections Facility from private company Serco following allegations of prisoner mistreatment, Corrections is now facing questions of its own after the suicide of another inmate at one of the prisons it runs.

The death is another black mark against the prison service, and further evidence that more needs to be done in the field of suicide prevention not only in private prisons but also in state-run ones as well.

In this latest case, a Paremoremo inmate committed suicide on Monday after swallowing a watch battery.

Three weeks ago the inmate had slit his wrists and was taken to the prison hospital.

A source said Corrections had refused to clean all the blood from the man’s cell for over a week, claiming it was a ‘crime scene’.

“We had to look at it and smell it,” the source said.

“Corrections were clearly on notice of the guy’s high suicide risk. How much longer will these preventable deaths continue in New Zealand prisons?”

It was only six weeks go that prison guards found a member of the Headhunters gang dead in his cell on the top of Paremoremo’s B block landing.

Prison sources say the man had hung himself.

Over the past five financial years there have been 88 suicide attempts behind bars.

Hawke’s Bay Regional Prison had the worst record, registering 13 suicide attempts over the five years. That was followed by 11 suicide attempts at Auckland Prison, and eight each at Christchurch Men’s Prison, Christchurch Women’s Prison and Waikeria Prison.

Only four facilities registered zero suicide attempts – Invercargill Prison, Rolleston Prison, Tongariro/Rangipo Prison and Wellington Prison.

There were five suicide attempts at the Mt Eden Corrections Facility.

In a recent interview, Corrections National Commissioner Jeremy Lightfoot claimed the department was doing everything it could to stop inmates from killing themselves behind bars.

He said the department was committed to preventing suicide in prison, but noted prisoners had a high risk of mental health disorders which made dealing with the problem a challenge.

‘In order to understand and address a prisoner’s medical condition, we conduct health screenings when a prisoner is received into prison and when they are transferred into prisons,” he said.

But he conceded Corrections would never be able to completely prevent suicides.

“Despite our efforts to reduce suicide and self-harm in prison it is incredibly difficult to stop someone who is determined to harm themselves.”

Over the past five years there have been 35 unnatural deaths in custody, which include murders and suicides. The deaths were spread among 14 prisons.

The only facilities not to record any unnatural deaths for the period were Arohata Prison, Auckland Region Women’s Prison, Rolleston Prison and Tongariro/Rangipo Prison.

Seven out of the 35 deaths – or 20 percent – were at Christchurch Men’s Prison. There were five deaths at Rimutaka Prison, and three each at Auckland Prison, Northland Region Corrections Facility, Waikeria Prison and Whanganui Prison.

Despite recent public concerns about the Mt Eden Corrections Facility, there has only been one unnatural death registered there since Serco took over management.

 


cookStephen Cook is a multi award winning journalist and former news editor and assistant editor of the Herald on Sunday.

 

Simple low-cost changes can lower prison suicides, but will they be implemented?

THE CORONER may have found a way to drastically reduce the country’s high prison suicide rate – but whether Corrections moves on his recommendations remains to be seen.

More prisoners are killing themselves than ever before with the suicide rate in New Zealand prisons now around 11 times higher than in the general population.

In the past five years alone there have been 31 suicides and at least a further 100 failed attempts at prisons around the country.

The suicides were spread among 14 prisons with seven – or 20 percent –carried out at Christchurch Men’s Prison, five at Rimutaka Prison, and three each at Auckland Prison, Northland Region Corrections Facility, Waikeria Prison and Whanganui Prison.

Bradley Steven Twidle is one of those 31 inmates who committed suicide while in the official custody and care of Corrections. He took his own life in December 2013 after asking to be segregated from a man who had been convicted of sexually assaulting him.

A police investigation into Twidle’s death found that he’d worked in the prison laundry, where he was considered a good worker, on the morning of December 6, 2013.

However, when a prison worker came to his cell to get him to work he’d appeared “slightly distracted” and was twice asked to get moving. Read more »

Kelvin? Kelvin? Where are you…someone has been stabbed in a prison

Kelvin Davis has been making much of problems in just one prison in New Zealand. The one run by Serco at Mt Eden.

For some strange reason, for a man who is looking to raise his profile ahead of a leadership challenge against Andrew Little he has remained silent on numerous incidents in Corrections run prisons.

Like the stabbing at Paremoremo.

A 27-year-old prisoner has been stabbed in Auckland Prison at Paremoremo.

St John Ambulance transferred the man in a serious condition from the North Shore prison to Auckland City Hospital at 11:40am on Sunday.    Read more »

Prisoner dies in Corrections run Auckland Prison

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AN INMATE has been found dead at maximum-security Paremoremo Prison – and this time it’s on Corrections’ watch.

Just weeks after taking over the management of Mt Eden Corrections Facility from private company Serco following allegations of prisoner mistreatment, Corrections is now facing questions of its own after the suicide of an inmate at one of the prisons it runs.

The death is another black mark against the prison service, and further evidence that more needs to be done in the field of suicide prevention not only in private prisons but also in state-run ones as well.

In this latest case, prison guards found a member of the Headhunters gang, believed to be in his 30s, dead in his cell on the top landing of B block in the early hours of Sunday morning.

Prison sources say the man had hung himself.

It is understood the death has been referred to the Coroner and will also be subject to a review by the Corrections Inspectorate.

Both these steps are largely procedural and are unlikely to shed any light on the bigger questions, including why the man wasn’t flagged as a suicide risk by Corrections staff who are supposedly trained to pick up when an inmate is in serious emotional distress.   Read more »