Auschwitz concentration camp

Photo Of The Day

Solomon and Frieda Radasky. After over 50 years of marriage and two children, Frieda Radasky passed away in 1999. Frieda, like her husband, was from Warsaw.

Solomon and Frieda Radasky. After over 50 years of marriage and two children, Frieda Radasky passed away in 1999. Frieda, like her husband, was from Warsaw.

Solomon Radasky

Survivor

The 27th of January was Holocaust Memorial Day, we remember how little we remember. Despite the many movies, books and survivor testimonies, there are the countless stories that have been lost and there are all the non-transmissible sensations. One who was not there can never know what it felt like to be there.

How did I survive? When a person is in trouble he wants to live. He fights for his life…Some people say, “Eh — What will be, will be.” No! You have to fight for yourself day by day. Some people did not care. They said, “I do not want to live. What is the difference? I don’t give a damn.” I was thinking day by day. I want to live. A person has to hold on to his own will, hold on to that to the last minute.

I am from Warsaw. I lived in Praga, which is the part of the city across the Vistula river. I had a nice life there; I had my own shop where I used to make fur coats. In Warsaw when a Jewish holiday came we used to know it was a holiday. All the stores were closed, and the people were in the synagogues.

Out of the 78 people in my family, I am the only one to survive. My parents had 3 boys and 3 girls: My parents were Jacob and Toby; my brothers were Moishe and Baruch, and my sisters were Sarah, Rivka and Leah. They were all killed.

My mother and my older sister were killed in the last week of January 1941. The year 1941 was a cold winter with a lot of snow. One morning the SD and the Jewish police caught me in the street. I was forced to work with a lot of other people clearing snow from the railroad tracks. Our job was to keep the trains running.

When I returned to the ghetto I found out that my mother and older sister had been killed. The Germans demanded that the Judenrat collect gold and furs from the people in the ghetto. When they asked my mother for jewelry and furs, she said she had none. So they shot her and my older sister too.

My father was killed in April 1942. He went to buy bread from the children who were smuggling food into the ghetto. The children brought bread, potatoes and cabbages across the wall into the Warsaw ghetto. A Jewish policeman pointed out my father to a German and told him that he saw my father take a bread from a boy at the wall. The German shot my father in the back.

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No wonder the left want a red triangle on the flag…it reminds them of their past

Red-peak-flag

There is a massive push on to knee cap the process the left-wing all dissed, pushing a flag with a big red triangle on it.

I have wondered why they are dead keen on this, and even why Andrew Little is enamoured with the idea.

You see it harks back to the 1940s….when totalitarism was the enemy and where enemies of the state were marked.    Read more »

Photo Of The Day

This drawing was made by an unknown KZ prisoner.

This drawing was made by an unknown KZ prisoner.

A prisoner hung by the knees, hands and feet tied. Behind him a SS man beating him with a whip. Wilhelm Boger, a guard in the “politischen Abteilung” from Auschwitz-Birkenau invented this torture which was called the “Bogerschauckel”. Most prisoners didn’t survive this torture.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: NBC News

Photo: NBC News

Auschwitz Survivor Gena Turgel Walked Out of Gas Chamber Alive

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The last voices of The Holocaust

Today is the seventieth anniversary of the liberation of Auschwitz.

The Washington Post has produced this clip.

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Faces of the day

Lest we forget, today’s faces of the day will remind us. These are powerful images drawn by artists who experienced the horrors of Auschwitz themselves.

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The Nazis did all they could to make their Jewish captives faceless, dressing them in uniforms and tattooing them with numbers that would become their new identities.

In the midst of that horror — indeed, in perhaps the most horrific place a Jew could land at the time — prisoners sought to take their images back and made sure that art was still present.

Franciszek Jaźwiecki, a Polish artist and political prisoner at Auschwitz, made portraits of fellow prisoners. Though the portraits portrayed prisoners of various nationalities and ages, they shared the same haunting quality, according to Agnieszka Sieradzka, an art historian at the Auschwitz-Birkenau State Museum.

“The most interesting in these portraits are eyes — a very strange helplessness,” she says. “Prisoners created portraits because the desire to have an image was very strong.”

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