autopsy

Photo Of The Day

Marie Robards poisoned her own father. A reading of Hamlet made her confess. (Yearbook photo, police photo, documentary 'Les Enquetes Posibles").

Marie Robards poisoned her own father. A reading of Hamlet made her confess. (Yearbook photo, police photo, documentary ‘Les Enquetes Posibles”).

Poisoning Daddy

How a So Called Loving Daughter and Star Student Stole Barium Acetate From Her High School Chemistry Lab, Put it in Her Father’s Refried Beans, and Almost Got Away With Murder.

Fort Worth, Texas – 16-year-old Dorothy Marie Robards was a beautiful, intelligent girl. She was also every boy next door’s dream: long-legged with gorgeous brown eyes Robards was the most popular girl at  Granbury High School. Robards and her mother Beth Burroughs, had a sisterly relationship, more so than that of parent and child. They chatted well into the night. Robards loved regaling her mother with tales of her many amours and her school achievements. Later, a court psychologist would claim, “When I saw them, they were quite affectionate in an overt fashion, hugging one another, finishing each other’s sentences. It wasn’t anything pathological, anything dark or disturbing. But they acted more like contemporaries than mother and daughter. They were like sisters who had grown up together.”

  “Are you, like, serious?” exclaims the preppily dressed Stacey High. “Have you ever gotten a good look at her? Marie is, like, gorgeous! In high school she was one of the most mature girls I had ever met. I thought, ‘Wow, if I hang around her, she’ll keep me motivated, help me act a little more serious.’”

Stacey stares at a prom photograph of her and Marie Robards, her best friend during her senior year in high school. “We used to do everything together. I mean, everything. And then I find out that she has gone off and poisoned her dad for this totally crazy reason. I mean, how weird is that?”

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Photo Of The Day

(FILES) - Picture taken on January 20, 2004 in Toulouse (southwestern France) shows Frenchman Andre Bamberski holding a picture of her daughter Kalinka Bamberski who was allegedly raped and murdered by her German stepfather doctor Dieter Krombach in 1982. Krombach was found on October 18, 2009, wounded and tied up in front of Mulhouse courthouse (eastern France). He has been put under police custody as well as Bamberski who was oddly present in the area. AFP PHOTO / REMY GABALDA (Photo credit should read REMY GABALDA/AFP/Getty Images)

Picture taken on January 20, 2004 in Toulouse (southwestern France) shows Frenchman Andre Bamberski holding a picture of her daughter Kalinka Bamberski who was allegedly raped and murdered by her German stepfather doctor Dieter Krombach in 1982. Krombach was found on October 18, 2009, wounded and tied up in front of Mulhouse courthouse (eastern France). He has been put under police custody as well as Bamberski who was oddly present in the area. AFP PHOTO / REMY GABALDA (Photo credit should read REMY GABALDA/AFP/Getty Images)

Kalinka

When 14-year-old Kalinka was found dead in 1982, her father Andre Bamberski, a quietly-spoken man, took the law into his own hands. For three long decades Andre Bamberski waged a tireless campaign to win justice for the daughter he was sure had been murdered. Pretty, sports-mad Kalinka, 14, was found dead in suspicious circumstances.

The abduction of Dr. Dieter Krombach began in the village of Scheidegg, in southern Germany. His three kidnappers punched him in the face, tied him up, gagged him, and threw him in the back of their car. They drove 150 miles, crossing the border into the Alsace region of France, with Krombach stretched out on the floor between the seats. The car stopped in the town of Mulhouse.

An accomplice called the local police and stayed on the line just long enough to deliver a bizarre instruction: “Go to the rue de Tilleul, across from the customs office,” the anonymous caller said. “You’ll find a man tied up.” A few minutes later, two police cars arrived at the scene, their red and blue patrol lights illuminating the street. Behind an iron gate, in a dingy courtyard between two four-story buildings, Krombach lay on the ground. His hands and feet were bound and his mouth was gagged. He was roughed up but very much alive. When the police removed the covering from his mouth, the first thing he said was “Bamberski is behind it.”

The French septuagenarian André Bamberski to whom Krombach referred was, on the face of it, an unlikely kidnapper. Until 1982, he had been a mild-mannered accountant and the adoring father of a lively young girl, Kalinka. That year, Kalinka attended a French-language high school in the small German city of Freiburg, as a boarder, and spent most weekends and summers in nearby Lindau, with Bamberski’s ex-wife and her new husband, Dieter Krombach.

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Photo Of The Day

Napoleon

 Napoleon’s little Napoleon

People have been fixated on Napoleon’s penis since Napoleon’s doctor allegedly cut it off during his autopsy. The penis, which was not properly preserved, has been compared over the years to a piece of leather, a shrivelled eel and to beef jerky. In 1927 when it went on display in Manhattan, TIME weighed in, comparing it to a “maltreated strip of buckskin shoelace.” It’s enough to give anyone a complex!

Napoleon died in 1821, likely of stomach cancer, and was originally buried on the island of his exile, St. Helena. At least, most of him was. During the autopsy, the doctor allegedly decided to take Napoleon’s penis, presumably as a bizarre souvenir. The doctor gave it to a priest for safekeeping, and the priest smuggled the part to Corsica. After that, Little Napoleon was passed down as sort of a perverse family heirloom for decades.

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The unfixed brain

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