Battle of Waterloo

Photo Of The Day

Napoleon

 Napoleon’s little Napoleon

People have been fixated on Napoleon’s penis since Napoleon’s doctor allegedly cut it off during his autopsy. The penis, which was not properly preserved, has been compared over the years to a piece of leather, a shrivelled eel and to beef jerky. In 1927 when it went on display in Manhattan, TIME weighed in, comparing it to a “maltreated strip of buckskin shoelace.” It’s enough to give anyone a complex!

Napoleon died in 1821, likely of stomach cancer, and was originally buried on the island of his exile, St. Helena. At least, most of him was. During the autopsy, the doctor allegedly decided to take Napoleon’s penis, presumably as a bizarre souvenir. The doctor gave it to a priest for safekeeping, and the priest smuggled the part to Corsica. After that, Little Napoleon was passed down as sort of a perverse family heirloom for decades.

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They should have a coin of the French marching backwards

cheese_eating_surrender_monkey

The cheese eating surrender monkeys are having a massive sook because of plans for a €2 coin to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the historic battle fought by the Duke of Wellington against Napoleon Bonaparte in 1815 because it would be a “symbol that is negative”.

I would have thought that having an army with a reputation for only winning when not led by a French man and being one of the world’s best at marching backwards would have been more negative.

The French government is attempting to block a coin commemorating the Battle of Waterloo, claiming it is a “symbol that is negative” and would undermine the unity of the eurozone.

In an extraordinary intervention, France wants to block plans for a €2 coin to celebrate the 200th anniversary of the historic battle fought by the Duke of Wellington against Napoleon Bonaparte in 1815.

A draft design of the coin was submitted to the Council of the European Union by Belgium, the site of the battle, in February this year.

However, just days letter France objected to the coin, claiming it could cause “hostile reactions in France” and undermine the eurozone.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.