BBC News

Hacking fallout

When unethical so called’ journalists ‘ hack members of the public or work closely with hackers in order to gain such information the human cost is often forgotten.

Nicky Hager-Dirty Politics

Nicky Hager

 

I guess we should be grateful that Nicky Hager was so ‘ honest ‘ about where he obtained his information as at least it spared Cameron and I the grief that this poor couple were put through. The hacking of their phone conversations cost them their relationship and hurt their careers because as the media bit by bit revealed their private information they blamed each other for the leaks, as only the two of them knew the information. Additionally at work no one would trust them as they believed that they were blabbing work related information to the press.

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An enemy that targets children

Then people brought little children to Jesus for him to place his hands on them and pray for them. But the disciples rebuked them.

Jesus said, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.”

-biblehub.com

School pupil Mohammad Baqair lost his mother, a teacher, in the attack  -BBC

School pupil Mohammad Baqair lost his mother, a teacher, in the attack
-BBC

Militants from the Pakistani Taliban have attacked an army-run school in Peshawar, killing 141 people, 132 of them children, the military say.

Officials say the attack in the north-western city is over, with all the attackers killed. Seven militants took part in all, according to the army.

Seven militants was all it took to massacre 132 children. Seven. One militant with a suicide vest or a remote controlled bomb can kill even more. Next time you are told that the enemy are in the minority remember this massacre. Remember what a ruthless enemy that targets children can do with only tiny numbers. Remember.

Scores of survivors are being treated in hospitals as frantic parents search for news of their children.

The attack – the Taliban’s deadliest in Pakistan – has been widely condemned.

Describing the attack from his hospital bed to the BBC’s Shaimaa Khalil, Shahrukh Khan, 17, said a gunman had entered his classroom and opened fire at random.

As he hid under a desk, he saw his friends being shot, one in the head and one in the chest. Two teachers were also killed…

…A Taliban spokesman told BBC Urdu that the school, which is run by the army, had been targeted in response to military operations.

…US President Barack Obama said terrorists had “once again shown their depravity” while UN Secretary General Ban Ki-moon said it was “an act of horror and rank cowardice”.

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Face of the day

 

Rupert Murdoch

Rupert Murdoch

Recent events make this story relevant and raises this question.

If Media using hacked material is a crime in the UK why is it not a crime in NZ?

The only difference is who committed the crime. In both instances the Media benefit from the crime and sell newspapers off of it.

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The Year of the Whores?

via Yahoo! Len Brown celebrating the start of the Year of the Whores

via Yahoo! Len Brown celebrating the start of the Year of the Whores

Celebrations began Friday in China to welcome the Year of the Horse.

The official seven-day holiday is marked by parades, prayers – and usually pyrotechnics. Certainly there were celebrations yesterday at Northcote, but watching the video of Len Brown again got me thinking…why was he so enthusiastic about the Year of the Horse?

The Herald reported his comments:

“Anything to do with horses, man, I’m totally in it. We’re galloping along as a city so look out.”

Here is he video:

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Imagine life without Radio NZ and TVNZ? … Bliss?

Think about how great it would be without the left wing bias and just plain wrong-ness of Radio NZ and TVNZ.

Earlier I blogged about what is happening in Greece…now the subsidised illuminati of the BBC are working themselves into a lather in the UK.

But others like me think it would be bliss, and the trough-snufflers of state funded broadcasting would finally have their throats cut.

John Humphrys has invited Radio 4 listeners to imagine life without the BBC. They are to picture themselves sitting down to watch Countryfile or Holby City, only for the screen to go black. That’s what happened to the Greek national broadcaster ERT, you see, the Hellenic equivalent of the BBC. On Tuesday night the good citizens of Greece were watching the news when… pfft. Apparently the money had run out.

I closed my eyes, but before I had a chance to imagine a Britain without the BBC, Humphrys dismissed the idea as “unimaginable”. You have to admire the complacency behind that “unimaginable”. The Herculean smugness. The scale of the self-congratulation. And it’s not just Humphrys. They’re all at it, all the 30,000 or so people who work for the BBC.  Read more »

Liberty Scott on Leveson

Liberty Scott smells a rat in the Leveson inquiry:

  1. Phone hacking is already illegal in the UK.
  2. Attempting to corrupt a public official is illegal.
  3. Stalking was made a crime in the UK a week ago.
  4. Breaking and entering private property in the UK is already illegal.
  5. The UK has one of the world’s toughest defamation laws, which are already blamed for suppressing people speaking up about allegations of sexual abuse by public figures.
  6. In short, the vile events presented in evidence were, in most instances, already illegal.

So consider, for a moment, why new laws and a new regulator is needed to enforce that which the Police have been lax to enforce now.

So really there is no need for any additional regulation or laws governing the media…it could be argued that there should be less laws.

Some more salient facts that the more shrieky out there overlook.

  1. News International is not dominant in the newspaper market in the UK.  It owns the second most popular out of the five serious national Monday-Saturday papers, and the most popular of the five tabloid/populist papers.  Only 34% of national newspapers read in the UK are News Corp papers.  Around 8 million national newspapers are sold every day in the UK.
  2. News International is not dominant in the television market in the UK.    It owns one free to air TV channel (Sky News) compared with the state which owns ten through the BBC and five through Channel 4 (excluding another five “+1” timeshifted channels). It owns the largest pay TV provider (BSkyB in 17% of UK/Irish households), with two major competitors (Virgin Media, BT Vision). The BBC is funded predominantly through a TV licence payable by threat of criminal prosecution.  BSkyB is funded voluntarily through subscription.  BSkyB is forced by the state to onsell its premium sports content to its competitors.  About 9 million people watch the BBC’s two nightly TV bulletins every day.  Another 2.2 million watch the BBC News channel daily, while 1.5 million watch Sky News.
  3. News Corporation has no radio stations in the UK.  By contrast, the state owns 11 national radio stations and 48 regional/local radio stations through the BBC.
  4. Any form of legislation to regulate the press will require the licensing of newspapers, which was last abolished in 1644.   By definition, a regulator will be led by people appointed by politicians, by definition it will be a creature of politics.

Liberty Scott asks about motives:

Look at those asking for a regulator.  What’s their motive?  Ask why a publisher should require permission from the state to publish?  Ask if you think the Labour Party would be so keen on regulating the press if the Times and the Sun hadn’t decided to stop supporting it after the 2005 election and Gordon (“I’ve abolished boom and bust”) Brown became Prime Minister?  Ask why the BBC, which has been at the forefront of supporting press regulation, isn’t regulated by OfCom and itself failed to report on its own former stars committing criminal sexual acts, yet press regulation enthusiasts regard it to be a bastion of ethics?

Can you imagine the resistance by the pro-press regulation left against anyone daring to suggest that the behemoth of a state broadcaster (the world’s largest state broadcaster) be independently investigated and broken up because of the dominance of its influence?

Leveson has recommended legislation, to “protect press freedom”, although he doesn’t identify what threatens it.  Typically the number one [threat] to press freedom, is legislation.

He wants OfCom – the regulator of broadcasting (except the BBC, because it wouldn’t do to have the BBC regulated by the organisation regulating the private sector), to supervise the newspaper regulator.

What’s a newspaper?  Who knows.

This is from a man who has said that newspapers are “uniquely powerful” compared to the internet and social media, which probably reflects he is 63 years old, than any real insights into the media.

The Leveson Report is a doorstop.  Nothing more.

I for one tend to agree with him. No doubt Farrar will take the middle way and whine about this or that instead of standing for true freedom and deregulation.

If the mechanism to protect a free press is the shackles of regulation the we are in a right pickle.