Beijing

Kim Fatty the Second has to be KDC, surely?

China has banned the search term “Kim Fatty the Third” or ?”Jin San Pang”.

China has blocked internet searches for “Kim Fatty the Third”, a popular term that is used in China for North Korean leader Kim Jong-un.

The term “Jin San Pang” failed to produce any results on Baidu, China’s main search engine, or the country’s hugely popular social networking platform, Sina Weibo.

China’s army of internet censors have previously blocked searches for insulting names of the North Korean leader, including “Kim Pig the Third”.

The Apple Daily, a pro-democracy newspaper based in Hong Kong and Taiwan, said the recent ban was enforced after officials from Kim’s rogue regime asked Chinese officials to act.

The phrase Jin San Pang uses characters which roughly translates to ‘Kim’, ‘three’, and ‘fat’ – in reference to both his weight and his lineage as the third in the Kim dynasty. ?? Read more »

Bill Liu arrested in China

bill-liu

Bill Liu has been arrested in China.

A controversial Chinese businessman who has been living in New Zealand for more than a decade has been arrested upon his return to China.

William Yan, also known as Bill Liu?and Yang Liu, was detained after arriving at Capital International Airport in Beijing on Saturday, according to the Government-run press agency Xinhua. ? Read more »

After insulting their public transport Andrew Little tells the Chinese all about his anti-chinks housing policy

Andrew Little is showing us daily what a complete tool he is.

Last week he suggested we sell beef to Hindus in India, and try for a FTA with a country we already have one with. Two days ago?he complained about Beijing traffic and suggested that they needed a rail loop despite Beijing have 18 lines of quality metropolitan rail services.

And yesterday on The Nation he explained to China’s vice-president all about Labour’s racist anti-chink housing policy.

I just want to ask what did you talk about in this meeting with the vice president?

Well, it was quite an extended meeting. It went way over time, but we talked about the importance of the relationship between the two countries, talked about the relationship between the Labour Party and the Communist Party, talked about the free-trade agreement because we’ve got the upgrade being talked about there at the moment. We talked about a couple of sensitive issues. I raised the issue about land sales, both house sales and farm sales and how New Zealanders are feeling increasingly sensitive about that, and also the issue about human rights, and I raised that with Vice President Li in the same way that I raised it with President Xi Jinping at the end of last year in New Zealand and just say that New Zealand’s expectation of countries they are getting closer to is that we see that their people are treated fairly and properly and good judicial systems. And I made a comment about it was interesting seeing a human rights award being given to Robert Mugabe, because most New Zealanders would not see Robert Mugabe as a champion of human rights but quite the opposite. But it was a good discussion, very warm and friendly, and I was very pleased to have the time I had with Vice President Li.

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Andrew Little is a political retard

Andrew Little believes Beijing should have a rail system to help with congestion.

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Steve Joyce off to China – likely to face numerous ?please explains? over Lochinver

Steve Joyce is going to find his little jaunt to China somewhat tedious when he gets lecture after lecture about his dead head ministers stuffing up a deal.

Economic Development Minister Steven Joyce leaves tomorrow for his second visit to China this year, where he will represent the Government at the New Zealand-China Partnership Forum in Beijing. He will also visit Guangzhou in southern China, a significant economic player in the Chinese economy and a top source of Chinese students and tourists in New Zealand.

The Partnership Forum, which is running for the second time, is jointly organised by the New Zealand China Council and the China Centre for International Economic Exchanges. It will feature discussion among senior delegates from New Zealand and China on a range of topical issues key to the New Zealand-China relationship.

“The purpose of the Forum is to showcase the deepening strategic economic and trade partnership between New Zealand and China,” Mr Joyce says. “Participants from both countries, representing the public and private sectors, will explore the opportunities and challenges at the forefront of the relationship, and contribute to building the foundation for the relationship into the future. ?? Read more »

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Len’s got some competition for the world’s most liveable city

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Len Brown has some competition for his dream of Auckland being the most liveable city…and from China no less.

Chinese internet users have mocked a report claiming that Beijing is the country?s most liveable city even as they enjoy unusually blue skies in the lead-up to a major military parade.

China?s capital city ranked 69th out of the world?s 140 most liveable cities in the Economist Intelligence Unit?s (EIU) semi-annual survey, released this week.

The city was ranked higher than any other Chinese city, just ahead of neighbouring Tianjin where a massive explosion last week has left a toxic aftermath in its port area.

?Best joke of the week,? said one user of Weibo, China?s Twitter.

?Did they get extra points for all the smog?? asked another wag. ?? Read more »

Muslims cutting up rough in China, this won’t end well for them

The Chinese won’t be taking this lightly.

The Muslims will find the Chinese government is a whole lot less tolerant of them and their beliefs.

A proposed burqa ban in the capital city of Xinjiang province could spark further unrest in the troubled region, experts warn.

The Urumqi People’s Congress Standing Committee voted yesterday in favour of banning people from wearing the garment in public, the local news website?Tianshan.net reported.

The proposal must now be reviewed by the regional People’s Congress Standing Committee before it is implemented, though the report – later deleted from the site – did not specify when this would happen.

The burqa, a garment worn by Muslim woman to cover themselves from head-to-toe, is considered a symbol of religious extremism by the local authorities. ? ? Read more »

Photo Of The Day

CREDIT: Sim Chi Yin / VII / Courtesy United Photo Industries & Magnum Foundation. ?Big Rain? (?da yu? in Mandarin), 21, a KTV lounge worker, decorated his basement room  with a happy display of balloons. He lives in room A12 of a basement beneath Beijing?s north Third Ring Road. Originally from Heilongjiang in China?s northeast, he?s been in Beijing for the past year. He sleeps in the day and wakes up around 7 or 8pm to do his hair at a salon and then grabs a cab to go to work. Giving only his surname Chen, he said: ?I?m 1.8 m tall, weigh 120 jin (about 60kg), am male and interested in girls. What else do you want to know?? He was planning to move out. ?It?s too humid here,? he grumbled.

CREDIT: Sim Chi Yin / VII / Courtesy United Photo Industries & Magnum Foundation.
?Big Rain? (?da yu? in Mandarin), 21, a KTV lounge worker, decorated his basement room with a happy display of balloons. He lives in room A12 of a basement beneath Beijing?s north Third Ring Road. Originally from Heilongjiang in China?s northeast, he?s been in Beijing for the past year. He sleeps in the day and wakes up around 7 or 8pm to do his hair at a salon and then grabs a cab to go to work. Giving only his surname Chen, he said: ?I?m 1.8 m tall, weigh 120 jin (about 60kg), am male and interested in girls. What else do you want to know?? He was planning to move out. ?It?s too humid here,? he grumbled.

Chinas ?Rat Tribe?

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Chinese State TV Takes Aim At Bank of China – Confusion Reigns Supreme

Mainland China has largely ignored the obvious breaches in money laundering – until perhaps now.

In a rare public tussle between two powerful arms of the Chinese government, China’s state broadcaster took aim at Bank of China on Wednesday, accusing the lender of laundering money and helping clients skirt the country’s controls on cross-border fund transfers.

State TV CCTV has taken on the giant Bank of China and left commentators utterly confused. ?Bank of China is State owned as well.

China officially restricts the ability of individuals and businesses to move money across its borders. Chinese individuals aren’t allowed to exchange and move more than $50,000 a year out of the country. Chinese companies can exchange yuan for foreign currencies only for approved business purposes, such as paying for imports or approved foreign investments.

Yet we know that is nonsense, just have a look at the spending and investing habits of Mainland Chinese let alone the tsunami of cash flowing over to Hong Kong and sloshed into the property market.

Bank of China claims that the reports are false.

The answer may lie?somewhere here

For years, China’s economy benefited from large flows of cash into the country from exports and from foreign investors. Incoming dollars were exchanged for yuan at China’s central bank, putting more yuan into the economy. That made it easier for banks to lend and companies to grow, but it also stoked inflation and contributed to real estate and stock-market bubbles.

When money leaves, that system swings into reverse, and there is less money available to fund growth. Chinese regulators in recent months have said they would step up monitoring of illegal fund flows.

The world should?wait with weak knees if Beijing gets its act together and decides to get some of that cash back through enforcing their actual laws or heaven forbid, actually having a sophisticated taxation mechanism to stem the flow of the fleeing masses.

Some good advice for Labour, pity they aren’t listening

John Armstrong offers up some good advice for LAbour as they continue to pursue Judith Collins. Little do Labour know they are being set up, if only they would do a little bit of research would they realise how far down the set up track they have propelled themselves in chasing false leads, rumour and innuendo.

The only funny part about it all is that Winston Peters is the one who set them up and Labour are the ones suffering at the hands of voters as a result.

The Prime Minister took the rather unusual step of offering free advice to Labour yesterday. It was advice Labour would do well to heed. But it is unlikely to do so. At least not yet.

The gist of John Key’s message to Labour went something like this. “Make my day. In fact, make my election day. If you want to continue to rate below 30 per cent in the polls, just keep talking about the things that do not matter. Just keep doing that until election day.”

Among the things that do not matter – according to Key – is Labour’s pursuit of Judith Collins and who she did or did not have dinner with in Beijing six months ago and what she did or did not tell New Zealand’s ambassador afterwards. ?? Read more »

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