Berkeley

Dilbert founder Scott Adams tells UC Berkeley he’s done with them

The Blaze reports:

Scott Adams, creator the famed “Dilbert” comic strip, has been capturing attention over the last year or so with his observations about President Donald Trump and the public’s reaction to him.

[…]

[I]n the wake of the riots at the University of California, Berkeley, over an appearance by alt-right firebrand Milo Yiannopoulos, Adams’ gloves appear to be completely off.

Adams said he’s ending his support of Berkeley, where he received an MBA years ago. “I have been a big supporter lately, with both my time and money, but that ends today,” he wrote in his blog post last Friday. “I wish them well, but I wouldn’t feel safe or welcome on the campus. A Berkeley professor made that clear to me recently. He seems smart, so I’ll take his word for it.”   Read more »

Photo of the Day

Lee reads several newspapers daily. She especially likes the funnies, and always does the Word Scramble puzzles. © Jessica Eve Rattner

Lee reads several newspapers daily. She especially likes the funnies, and always does the Word Scramble puzzles. © Jessica Eve Rattner

House of Charm

House of Charm is the ongoing portrait of Lee, a woman whose eccentricities conceal a beauty and intelligence that most people do not easily see

In 2003, the photographer Jessica Eve Rattner moved into a house in Berkeley, California, around the corner from an old woman named Lee.

At first, Rattner knew Lee as a shopping-cart pushing raider of recycling bins, a dishevelled old woman with foot-tall dreadlocked hair. But a quick exchange in the driveway, while Lee scoured for recycled cans, changed everything. Instead of dismissing her outright, Rattner became smitten by her intelligence and quirky charm. She asked Lee if it was okay to photograph her, and to her surprise, she agreed.

At first, like others, I knew her as the neighbourhood “bag lady,” a dread-locked raider of recycling bins who pushed her shopping cart through the early morning streets. Lee’s dilapidated home stood out in a neighbourhood where even the most modest homes were valued at half a million dollars. She had neither heat nor running water. The roof and floors were rotting; many windows were broken; and the rooms were choked with recycling, found objects, and cat feces. The condition of her house was — and continues to be — what most would consider uninhabitable.

Most people perceive Lee as “crazy,” someone to be avoided. Few get close enough to learn that while she is eccentric, she is also intelligent, charming, and self-assured. And perhaps most remarkably, that she leads the life she chooses to — one for which she is neither apologetic or ashamed.

Rattner has long been interested in ideas of beauty, happiness, and mental health — especially as they relate to women. In a culture obsessed with youth, materialism, and physical appearance, Lee’s apparent indifference to these things sets her apart. Lee will soon turn eighty. Is Lee crazy to be happy in conditions others could not tolerate? Is something wrong with her? Who decides?

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Photo Of The Day

Joshua A. Miele, here in Berkeley, Calif., was 4 when a next-door neighbor came to the gate of his family’s home in Brooklyn and tossed sulfuric acid into his face, blinding him. Credit Jim Wilson/The New York Times.

Joshua A. Miele, here in Berkeley, Calif., was 4 when a next-door neighbor came to the gate of his family’s home in Brooklyn and tossed sulfuric acid into his face, blinding him. Credit Jim Wilson/The New York Times.

Joshua Miele‘s Sight Was Stolen From Him When He Was A Child

Forty Something Years Later, He’s Giving the Blind a Bright Future

A neighbourhood boy remembers hearing of a little boy blinded by a schizophrenic man who threw acid on him at the age of 4. Decades later he looks up the man that little boy has become and writes an article about him.

The subject of the article, Josh Miele, is the President of the LightHouse Board. In addition to heading the LightHouse with leadership and vision, Josh is an associate scientist at the Smith-Kettlewell Eye Research Institute, where he has partnered with the LightHouse to create tactile-Braille maps of every station of the Bay Area Rapid Transit system (BART). The New York Times called the maps, “exquisite things with raised lines of plastic and Braille labels. They elegantly lay out information that can be heard by using an audio smart pen”.

On an October afternoon 43 years ago, on a beautiful block in Park Slope, Brooklyn, a crime occurred in a split second that was as permanent as it was cruel. Grown-ups tried to make sense of it, even use it as a cautionary tale for their children, but in the end, many just put it out of their minds. How could they not? It was just too awful, its lessons too hard to fathom.

The victim was named Josh Miele. He was 4. On that day, Oct. 5, 1973, he was playing in the backyard of his family’s house on President Street while his mother, Isabella, cooked in the kitchen. The doorbell rang, and Josh sprinted to get it.

Standing on the other side of the heavy iron gate beneath the stoop was Basilio Bousa, 24, who lived next door. Josh unlocked it. Then he slipped his two feet into the gate’s lowest rung and grabbed hold with his hands so his weight would pull it open. But Basilio just stood there. Basilio didn’t move or speak. So Josh stepped out, into the open. And then, he couldn’t see. He didn’t know why. He felt around with his hands, grasping for the walls. He forced his eyes open and glimpsed the wood paneling in the vestibule. It was the last thing he ever saw.

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