betrayal

Photo of the Day

WING COMMANDER FOREST FREDERICK EDWARD YEO-THOMAS – British Special Operations Executive (SOE) agent

“The White Rabbit”

His action-packed life was the stuff of boyhood fantasy

Tommy Yeo-Thomas was dropped into occupied France three times and fell into the hands of the Paris SS and Gestapo. Brutally interrogated to the point of death for a total of over 6 months at the SS and Gestapo HQ at 84 Avenue Foch and Fresnes Prison, he told the Germans nothing. Transported to Buchenwald Concentration Camp he escaped and eventually made his way to the Allied lines.

Espionage has always been a business marked by deceit, betrayal, and frequently, death. The fate of a captured spy is usually brutal, and even relatively benign entities like the Allies dealt harshly with such individuals. Still, their treatment was relatively kind compared to the Nazis. The remarkable World War II?spy stories?include heroes and villains, loyalists and traitors, and the greatest World War II spies that were motivated by duty, principle,?or just plain money.

Forest Yeo-Thomas

Recruited: February 1942

Role: Deputy Head (RF Section)

Missions: SEAHORSE, MARIE CLAIRE, ASYMPTOTE

Codenames: Shelley, “The White Rabbit”

Fate: Captured, deported to Germany, survived

Forest Frederic Edward Yeo-Thomas (who went by F. F. E. Yeo-Thomas) was not your typical clich? espionage agent, photographing documents in the early morning hours behind the embassy doors of some darkened office. After serving for two years in the RAF during the Battle of Britain, Yeo-Thomas requested even more hazardous duty in occupied France serving as a liaison between the French government in exile and the Resistance.

On his third mission in 1944, he was betrayed to the Gestapo and was so badly mistreated that he developed blood poisoning from the shackles worn during his isolated confinement. After numerous escape attempts (which prompted the Gestapo nickname “the White Rabbit”), Yeo-Thomas was transported to Buchenwald. He survived eight more months of abuse, escaped from a work detail, and eventually lead other POWs to freedom in the final days of the war. Yeo-Thomas is recognised by the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography as “among the most outstanding workers behind enemy lines whom Britain produced”. Yeo-Thomas is also credited as the inspiration for the character James Bond.

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Photo of the Day

Mrs Wilde, c. 1887

Heartbreak Betrayal and the Unimportance of being Mrs Oscar Wilde

Constance Wilde was the long-suffering wife who remained loyal to her husband Oscar even after he was convicted of ?committing acts of gross indecency? (that is, consensual sex) with other men.

The circulation of such stories indicated a widespread desire to establish Constance as something other than a wife crushed by rejection and betrayal. Fortunately, the evidence of more than 300 of Constance?s unpublished letters, is that she was far more interesting than this.

In some ways, Oscar and Constance were a good match. Both had troubled family histories: in his case a surgeon father accused by a former patient of raping her while she was anaesthetized, and in hers a grandfather who exposed himself by running around naked ?in the sight of some nursemaids?, followed by a mother whose parenting techniques included ?threatening with the fire-irons or having one?s head thumped against the wall?.

More importantly, both husband and wife were clever and ambitious, and for the first few years of their marriage, their lives ran along parallel tracks. While he lectured on the need for women to abandon constricting corsets and dangerously flammable crinolines, she put the idea of ?rational? dress into practice by wearing daringly baggy trousers and plenty of wool. His theories about the ?house beautiful? were supported by her designs for their marital home in Chelsea, an ordinary red-brick villa that they transformed into a temple to aestheticism. Even Oscar?s disappearances into a hidden side of London?s nightlife found echoes in his wife?s experiments with the occult.

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New Zealand are “useful idiots”. Well, Murray is at least

UN Security Council Resolution 2334 will inflict serious and enduring damage to the State of Israel and to the Jewish people. It brands Israel, the nation state of the Jewish people, a ?flagrant? violator of international law, fueling the movement to isolate it and turn it into a pariah among nations. As such it will promote the growing anti-Semitism around the world. It may even invite or be used to justify horrific terrorist attacks of the sort we have seen in Jerusalem this month. But those are not the primary reasons the President should have vetoed it.

The United States should not surprise (some have used the term ?ambush?) a close ally and friend in an important forum like the UN Security Council, as it seems clear was done in this case. But that also is not the main reason he should have vetoed it.

The American president should not base critical foreign policy decisions on personal animus, as it appears he did here. But that too is not the most important reason he should have vetoed it.

The decision was not only highly inappropriate for a ?lame duck? president, designed to make it more difficult for the incoming administration to pursue its foreign-policy goals, but there can be little doubt that he knew his action was antithetical to the bipartisan views of the majority of the American people. In other words, his action was deeply undemocratic. But even that, although more than cause enough, is not the main reason he should have vetoed it.

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