bird

Make a difference, shoot some Pukes

Hunting & Fishing has a good reason to go shooting Pukekos.

With pukeko being on the game bird hunting schedule, now that ducks have become more wary and harder to locate, Queens Birthday Weekend is an ideal time to organise a puke hunt (check with your local Fish and Game for hunting regulations – zero bag limit in Otago and Southland).? Breasted and casseroled, you will be very pleasantly surprised at the eating quality of these birds, but after all, they are selective clean feeders.? (Avoid the legs though as they are full of sinues.)

Why target a bird that may appear to be more comical than challenging, and harmless enough in its own environment?? The answer is that pukekos are in fact an intelligent bird that very quickly wises up to the ways of a hunter.? The most effective method of hunting them is with a group that can ?drive? the swampy or rough cover they inhabit, placing ?guns? at the end of the drive to cut off the likely escape routes. ? Read more »

Someone actually researched getting birds pissed

I’m surprised this wasn’t funded by Callaghan Innovation, it seems the sort of thing they like funding…or perhaps it is more the Marsden Fund’s bag.

Anyway, someone has actually researched getting birds pissed.

Here was me thinking all it took was a few glasses of bubbles.

Researchers conduct all sorts of strange experiments in the name of science, from studying the slipperiness of banana peels to looking at how dogs orient their bodies when they poop.

And now, in the latest example of strange science, researchers at Oregon Health & Science University in Portland got some finches drunk and watched what happened.

Their main finding? Like drunk humans, boozed-up birds slur their “speech.”

For the study, the researchers gave grape juice to one group of zebra finches and an alcoholic juice cocktail to another group. The cocktail-quaffing finches became somewhat inebriated, with blood alcohol levels of 0.05 percent to 0.08 percent, according to NPR. ? Read more »

Can’t blame this on the whitey, but they’ll try

canterbury-museum-moa-hunter-display

New evidence suggests, conclusively, that Maori slaughtered the moa to extinction, in stark contrast to the modern myth that they were the original conservationists.

For millions of years, nine species of large, flightless birds known as moas (Dinornithiformes) thrived in New Zealand. Then, about 600 years ago, they abruptly went extinct. Their die-off coincided with the arrival of the first humans on the islands in the late 13th century, and scientists have long wondered what role hunting by?Homo sapiens?played in the moas? decline. Did we alone drive the giant birds over the brink, or were they already on their way out thanks to disease and volcanic eruptions? Now, a new genetic study of moa fossils points to humankind as the sole perpetrator of the birds? extinction. The study adds to an ongoing debate about whether past peoples lived and hunted animals in a sustainable manner or were largely to blame for the extermination of numerous species.

?The paper presents a very convincing case of extinction due to humans,? says Carles Lalueza-Fox, an evolutionary biologist at the Institute of Evolutionary Biology in Barcelona, Spain, who was not involved in the research. ?It?s not because of a long, natural decline.?

When they say humankind they are avoiding upsetting the real culprits, the tangata whenua.

Archaeologists know that the Polynesians who first settled New Zealand ate moas of all ages, as well as the birds? eggs. With moa species ranging in size from 12 to 250 kilograms, the birds?which had never seen a terrestrial mammal before people arrived?offered sizable meals. ?You see heaps and heaps of the birds? bones in archaeological sites,? Allentoft says. ?If you hunt animals at all their life stages, they will never have a chance.?? Read more »

Crazy bird

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