Bloomberg

Mark Steyn blasts media and many outlets cower in the face of terrorism

Mark Steyn wishes that the media would try at least to find their testicles.

http://youtu.be/WklsCGIfLdQ

The Sunday Star-Times gets a dishonourable mention in the segment.

We saw yesterday the cowardice of the NZ Herald in publishing only those Charlie Hebdo cartoons that offend politicians, Christians and Jews, but not a single one that might offend a muslim.

David Farrar found his courage though, which puts the New Zealand media to shame, and this same attitude seems to prevail worldwide where legacy media lack courage and new media exhibit it in spades.

With few exceptions, it has been digital outlets like The Huffington Post, The Daily Beast, Business Insider, BuzzFeed, Vox, and Slate that have exercised their constitutional right by republishing the cartoons that are thought to be the basis for the attacks. In contrast, many “legacy” organizations, from CNN, to The Washington Post, to The New York Times, largely withheld the images. In explaining its decision not to distribute any of the images, the AP’s spokesman, Paul Colford, was quoted as saying, “It’s been our policy for years that we refrain from moving deliberately provocative images.” Bloomberg, meanwhile, published a slideshow that included many of the incendiary covers.  Read more »

Bloomberg gets it and is prepared to put his money where his mouth is

There is a saying that no one wins taking on the NRA.

They regularly rinse candidates and deploy their considerable resources against politicians who seek to impinge of the rights of all Americans to keep and bear arms.

But Michael Bloomberg is going to give it a crack at taking on the NRA…and spending $50 million to do it. He at least understands the daunting task, though I suspect his $50 million will be ineffective against the campaigning prowess of the NRA, who in all likelihood will use this declaration of war as a fundraising drive and pick up even more cash.

Michael R. Bloomberg, making his first major political investment since leaving office, plans to spend $50 million this year building a nationwide grass-roots network to motivate voters who feel strongly about curbing gun violence, an organization he hopes can eventually out muscle the National Rifle Association.

Mr. Bloomberg, the former mayor of New York, said gun control advocates need to learn from the N.R.A. and punish those politicians who fail to support their agenda — even Democrats whose positions otherwise align with his own.

“They say, ‘We don’t care. We’re going to go after you,’ ” he said of the N.R.A. “ ‘If you don’t vote with us we’re going to go after your kids and your grandkids and your great-grandkids. And we’re never going to stop.’ ”

He added: “We’ve got to make them afraid of us.”  Read more »

We weren’t joking, Obama really is the worlds best gun salesman

We’ve often used the line “worlds best gun salesman” here on the blog, but it’s not just a hollow slogan. It really is true:

U.S. gun makers led by Sturm Ruger & Co. and Smith & Wesson Holding Corp. (SWHC) churned out a record number of firearms in 2012, government data show, continuing a trend of robust production during Democratic presidencies.

More than 8.57 million guns were produced in 2012, up 31 percent from 6.54 million in 2011, according to data released this week by the U.S. Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives, which has been tracking the statistics since 1986.

Almost as many guns — 26.1 million — were produced during Democrat Barack Obama’s first term as president as during the entire eight-year presidency of his Republican predecessor, George W. Bush, the ATF data show.

Advocates on both sides of the gun-control debate said manufacturers were meeting demand fueled by concerns among gun owners that Democratic presidents are more willing to limit firearms sales than Republicans. After years of steering clear of the issue, Obama pressed unsuccessfully last year for stricter gun measures in the wake of the 2012 massacre at an elementary school in Newtown, Connecticut.

The production boom has resulted in strong sales and profits for gun companies, including Sturm & Ruger and Smith & Wesson. Read more »

Why the NRA won’t be defeated

Politicians and pundits all rounded on the NRA as the bad guys int he wake of Sandy Hook, missing the point entirely about gun control.

The NRA copped a flogging in the liberal media, especially from Piers Morgan as he idiotically mis-represented the law, milked the tragic situation and  politicked against the NRA.

But it was all to no effect as two senators in Colorado found out on Tuesday.

All that publicity and attacks just made the NRA more powerful.

While the NRA took its lumps in the months after Newtown, the group actually experienced a surge in membership and support that more than compensated for the drubbing they got in the mainstream press. Though liberals, including the president, falsely asserted that NRA support was merely the function of donations from gun manufacturers, it remained something that the anti-gun groups were not: a genuine grass-roots organization that could generate intense activity from its members when they were called upon.  Read more »

How to avoid the arse card for having a sook online about your boss

With more and more people using social media it is becoming increasingly frequent that people get the arse card from work because of intemperate comments on Facebook or Twitter.

In the US the National labour Relations Board has said you have a right to have a sook, but there are some boundaries you need to keep within.

The right of workers to get together and moan about their bosses has been enshrined in U.S. law ever since 1935, when President Roosevelt signed the landmark National Labor Relations Act. The heart of the statute, known as Section 7, guarantees employees the right to organize, collectively bargain, and “engage in other concerted activities” for their “mutual aid and protection.” That basically means you’ve got permission to whine about management at a bar without getting canned.

These days, that right also extends to the (often whiny) free-for-all that is social media. In a series of reports and rulings this year, the National Labor Relations Board clarified that you are indeed entitled to log onto Facebook or Twitter and gripe about your employer without facing retribution.

There is one case that helps explain it all:  Read more »