Boyd Swinburn

Another thing to add to the list of things caused by global warming

Apparently…and this is going to rip Boyd Swinburn’s undies…global warming is the cause of diabetes, not stuffing your face with huge amounts of food.

If the average temperature rises by 1 degree Celsius, sea levels will rise, crop yields will fall and vulnerable species will see their habitat shrink or disappear.

Which is bollocks because as temperature increases crops produce more, especially as carbon dioxide increases. Ask anyone growing commercially ina  greenhouse…they pump those puppies full of carbon dioxide.

And, a new study suggests, the number of American adults suffering from diabetes would rise by more than 100,000 a year.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Defamation? They’ll need to get in line

pigs-feeding-at-trough

Prof Doug Sellman of the University of Otago, Prof Boyd Swinburn of the University of Auckland and anti-smoking activist Shane Bradbock say Slater and Mr Graham have for “some years” been publishing “articles with a negative focus on various public health experts and advocates”.

Much of the pair’s work was revealed in Nicky Hager’s 2014 book Dirty Politics.

“We had hoped things would change, but the various articles and comments remain live on Whale Oil, and Mr Slater has continued to publish further material,” says Prof Swinburn.

“Accordingly, we have decided to bring these proceedings to address what we claim is a campaign of deliberate and sustained defamation.”

The trio say they will be making no further comments until the case has been dealt with by the courts.

The first I heard of this was when I was served the documents.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Apparently a NZ sugar tax is coming

Boyd Swindleburn

Boyd Swindleburn

According to Professor Boyd Swinburn a sugar fat bastard tax is inevitable, just not under a National Government.

Appearing on Paul Henry to discuss what is needed to stop child obesity in New Zealand, Boyd Swinburn is still whinging on about a letter he sent to the government months ago calling on a sugar fat bastard tax.

Sadly, Boyd Swinburn and his followers are upset that his theoretical modelling efforts aren’t being noticed. The usual line of taxes worked for tobacco therefore it must work for sugar, is another line not being swallowed by government.

And not surprisingly.

Even arts, travel and lifestyle blogger David Farrar has taken the call for a sugar tax to task.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Otago University really needs to get over itself

Oh boo hiss, those poor public health academics troughers from the University of Otago really do need to get over themselves.

Today’s ODT runs the article Challenging ‘big food’ can mean attacks, continuing the positioning of troughers as hard done by because they are apparently facing a dastardly foe called ‘big food’. This time the comments are from visiting Oxford University academic Professor David Stuckler, who says:

Taking on “big food” and other business interests can mean facing personal attacks and underhand tactics from powerful vested interests, a prominent Oxford University professor told health academics in Dunedin yesterday.

The “real politics” of the arena included attacks aimed at individual careers, and attempts to create arguments and division within the ranks of health advocates, Prof David Stuckler, a professor of political economy and sociology, said.

Tactics used by “big tobacco” appeared to be deployed by “big food” companies, too.

“We confront powerful vested interests who make and manufacture products that when used as intended cause grave harm.”

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Candy, soda and fast food are not driving the rising obesity trend in the US

unnamed

Well here’s a headline obesity troughers wouldn’t want you to see, but it’s the latest research findings from Cornell University.

Remember here in NZ, well known obesity troughers like Professor Boyd Swinburn, Stefanie Vandevijvere, $11 million dollar woman Cliona Ni Mhurchu and those anti fizzy drink activists FIZZ all believe sugar taxes are the answer to Kiwi kids getting fatter.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Lancet golden obesity troughers

Boyd Swinbun - Golden Obesity Trougher

Boyd Swinburn – Golden Obesity Trougher

Speaking of the University of Auckland troughers, well known anti-sugar activist and Trougher of the Year Professor Boyd Swinburn has a new gig – co-chair of the Lancet Commission on Obesity.

But it gets even better. Lo and behold somehow cat-hater and North Korean fan Gareth Morgan has also managed to become one of the 22 Commissioners as well.

With the obesity racket becoming bigger than Ben Hur, there’s no stopping them now expanding their remit to solving other problems of the world, especially when you consider this comment from Boyd Swinburn;

“Obesity is likely to share common determinants and solutions with other major emergent problems that the world is facing, such as climate change and inequities,” he says.

So Boyd Swinburn is tackling climate change now as well?   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Prof Swinburn unable to cope with “extraordinary Whale Oil-esque statement”

unnamed

Tucked inside a little-read magazine called New Zealand Listener is a letter to the editor from my good friend Professor Boyd Swinburn.

It seems the 2013 Trougher of the Year, and frequent flyer is a little upset about the Listener’s editorial on obesity, even going as far as suggesting they’re trying to copy the success of Whaleoil.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

NO sugar tax – Key

Mr Key says there is some evidence sugar taxes work, but “the government’s not doing that at the moment”.

“The problem with sugar tax is: So you put a sugar tax on fizzy drinks fair enough, OK. But what about everything else sugar is in?” he told TV3’s Paul Henry show.

But he said obesity has replaced smoking as the long-term issue for New Zealand.

“We do need to resolve these issues, but it’s a combination of education and exercise.”

Mr Key hinted the plan would work with schools to target exercise and dietary programmes.

The Ministry of Health has been working on the plan to combat obesity for almost a year.

The government’s chief science adviser Sir Peter Gluckman said last month evidence food taxes work was weak but they send signals.

Education, layout of supermarkets and companies reducing sugar and salt levels in food also make a difference, he said.

And that’s happening, and has been happening, for decades.  Low sugar and sugar-free versions of Coke are sitting right next to the sugary one.  It’s your decision to buy the one you think is right for you – they are all the same price.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Obesity Troughers cop blame – “Education not poverty behind kids’ obesity”

wwwWell blow me down and shiver me timbers – a headline that is actually right.

Today we have Fairfax running an article ‘Education not poverty behind kids’ obesity’ with an Auckland University researcher Nichola Shackleton saying ‘children’s weight does not fluctuate with parents’ incomes’ and ‘parental education might be a key driver in obesity’.

“We need to look at changing families’ values and attitudes around food and healthy diets. Education and social class, those are the things that form your opinions and buying habits. If you gave me extra money, it doesn’t change who I am.”

While Shackleton’s results were based on UK families, she questioned whether similar misconceptions about factors behind obesity could also occur in New Zealand. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Labour, Greens forget the pie ban cost them the 2008 election

unnamed-7

Typical, politicians have extremely short memories. Labour’s Annette King should know better, but long-term memory seems to be failing her.

Labour lost the 2008 election after New Zealanders got sick and tired of Labour politicians telling Kiwis how to live. They also ended up being called the “food police”.

Now they’re back at it, wanting bans on tuck shops and pushing their agenda via embedded journalist Kirsty Johnson;

Labour health spokeswoman Annette King said she would now expect the Government to bring back tuck shop regulation.

“It’s horrifying to New Zealanders that we are now considered one of the fattest nations in the world,” she said.

“We have wasted seven years, when we could have been doing something about it, for purely political reasons, because apparently saying what kids could eat was being a ‘nanny state’. I now look forward to seeing what the minister will do.”

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.