Brian Donnelly

Bigots mail to MPs

Kevin Hague has highlighted an example of some of the anti-marriage equality mail that MPs have received.

EXACTLY WHAT ARE GAYS #4

WHO SAYS WE NEED ‘OFFICIAL MARRIAGE’ FOR INSECURE HOMOSEXUALS?

WHAT’S WRONG WITH CIVIL UNION?

OR FOR EXTREME INSECURITY, MAYBE CASTRATION COULD RELIEVE THEIR ANXIETY

(IT DID FOR MY DOG) (BE LIKE GENETIC ENGINEERING TOO).

OR PERHAPS SUGGEST THEY GET ‘MARRIED’ IN UGANDA INSTEAD.

BE ALMOST WORTH IT TO PAY THEIR ONE WAY FARE.

DON’T YOU VOTE FOR SAME SEX MARRIAGE!

YOUR ELECTORATE WILL REMEMBER IN 2014!

xxxxxxx yyyyyyyyy

PS DON’T EVEN THINK ABOUT ADOPTION!

PPS YOUR MUM WASN’T A LESBIAN.

In response Kevin is reasonable and rational (and incredibly patient and polite).  I’ll be a little more direct to the letter writer.  “You are a dick.  Aside from being wrong on this issue you are also pushing MPs toward voting for marriage equality.  If you were smart you’d realise that MPs don’t want to be associated with extremists like you.”

Anyway, Hague then talks about his own relationship and what his committed relationship looks like – much like most committed (married) heterosexual relationships:

My partner and I got together in August 1984. That’s 28 years. Probably longer than many of the MPs who will end up voting against Louisa’s Bill. Our lives together are not really any different to those of many heterosexual couples. We cook and eat together, we watch TV, we do the gardening, we have stupid arguments, we visit our families and friends, we go cycling together, we pay the mortgage, we go to the supermarket, we have had a houseful of teenagers, we went to their parent-teacher interviews, we go to the gym. We love each other.

We don’t know if we will marry. But if we do, we hope you will celebrate with us, and recognise that lighting our candle does not extinguish yours – it just increases the light.

That last line “we hope you will celebrate with us, and recognise that lighting our candle does not extinguish yours – it just increases the light” is taken from my favourite speech from the Civil Union bill debate.

 I used to often tell my students: “You don’t make your own candle shine more brightly by blowing out somebody else’s.”, and the converse of that adage is: “My own candle will not glow more dimly if I should light somebody else’s.” Therefore, I ask this question: how will my own marriage be diminished by the passage of this legislation? The answer, and I am convinced it is the correct answer, is it will not make one iota of difference. If that is the case, what is so dreadfully wrong in allowing other New Zealanders of a different disposition to make a long-term, public commitment to someone they love?

Brian Donnelly was a New Zealand First MP, a great man, teacher and leader.  If he was still around I am sure that New Zealand First wouldn’t be the pussies they are being in suggesting they will either abstain or bloc vote against the bill.  I also thought that Denis O’Rourke was a man very like Donnelly (full of compassion and understanding) – I can only hope that O’Rourke will ‘man up’ and challenge Winston.

 

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Is this a triple or a quad?

Perhaps Ruth Dyson got the idea for legalising polygamy from Hugh Hefner who is having a few household problems of his own with this three current roots.

It seems that Hugh has fallen in lust for another bird and is spending as much time as possible with Dasha Astafieva, a former model from Ukraine, much to the anguish of the three other harlets he sleeps with.

I wonder how Hef will settle the dispute? Jelly wrestling, pay per view cat-fights? or an all in hair-pulling fight for reality TV?

Clearly all is not well at the Playboy Mansion.

Reblog this post

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

ACT too big for its boots

[Imported from Whale Oil Beef Hooked on Blogger]

The ACT party seems to be awefully mouthy this time of year given that its parliamentary numbers were reduced from 9 to 2 a few nights ago. Former leader Richard Prebble has said today that Brash should quit before he gets pushed.

What really annoying is that Richard Prebble, and all of the commentators have forgotten that there are over 200,000 special votes to count and the result isn’t final until then. National could quite possibly pick up an additional seat; the Greens could be gone from Parliament entirely; or Winston could be his usual self and do a flip flop on his election promise.

It seems Rodney Hide is at least smart enough to distance himself from Prebbles comments, but curiously has decided to criticize National election strategy instead:

Although Mr Hide, who returned to Wellington yesterday with Act’s second MP,
Heather Roy, would not endorse Mr Prebble’s comments, he criticised National’s
campaign strategy. “The National Party’s strategy of saying they could win 51
per cent and govern on their own was absolutely wrong-headed.”

While I can understand why ACT, and its leader, would make such a statement, we must be mindful of the fact that ACT only ever takes votes of National. If there were no ACT in future elections, National would be much better off.

And there is absolutely nothing wrong with aiming to be the biggest party in Parliament and trying to maximise the party vote. It’s called winning an election and if ACT had have thought of that 12 months ago, they wouldn’t be sitting on 1.5% right now, and wouldn’t have needed Epsom.

But no matter what they all say, it’s not over until the special votes sing.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.