British people

Toby Manhire wants us to follow in Denmark and Sweden’s footsteps.

Those who don’t learn from history are doomed to repeat it. Toby Manhire is such a person. Rather than do what Churchill did when he joined England in the fight against Nazism he thinks that a more gutsy decision would be to increase our immigration, thereby bringing into our democratic country the very ideology that John Key wants us to oppose.

Sweden and Denmark increased their immigration and look what happened.

Woe to anyone in Sweden who dissents from the orthodox view that welcoming large numbers of indigent peoples from such countries as Iraq, Syria, and Somalia is anything but a fine and noble idea. Even to argue that permitting about 1 percent of the existing population to emigrate annually from an alien civilization renders one politically, socially, and even legally beyond the pale. (I know a journalist threatened with arrest for mild dissent on this issue.) Stating that there exists a Swedish culture worth preserving meets with puzzlement. And yet, the realities of immigration are apparent for all to see: welfare dependency, violent bigotry against Christians and Jews, and a wide range of social pathologies from unemployment to politically motivated rape. Accordingly, ever-increasing numbers of Swedes find themselves ? despite known hazards ? opting out of the consensus and worrying about their country?s cultural suicide.
-nationalreview.com

All this is part, say critics, of a decade-long transformation in Denmark’s approach to immigration and integration, under pressure from the populist Danish People’s party, the DPP… Denmark’s Muslim population are the party’s particular focus. There are many Muslims, it says, who are unwilling to integrate and hostile to “Danish values” such as free speech.

-BBC.com

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Photo Of The Day

Winston Churchill (1874 - 1965) gives his famous V-sign as he opens the new headquarters of 615 (County of Surrey) Squadron of the RAAF (Royal Auxiliary Air Force) at Croydon in 1948 in England. (Photo by Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

Winston Churchill (1874 – 1965) gives his famous V-sign as he opens the new headquarters of 615 (County of Surrey) Squadron of the RAAF (Royal Auxiliary Air Force) at Croydon in 1948 in England. (Photo by Central Press/Hulton Archive/Getty Images)

V Sign

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Evans’ cartoon

Screen-Shot-2015-02-03-at-6.06.20-amThis cartoon by Evans really annoys me.

People die in war.

People die at the hands of terrorists at home as well.

When soldiers fight of course there will be deaths. But equally there is a price to pay for not being in John Key’s club.

  • Doing nothing means letting the enemy grow in strength unopposed.
  • Doing nothing means leaving other people and countries under attack without our support.
  • Doing nothing means we will not be able to count on others ( our allies ) coming to our aid when we are in trouble.

Imagine if Churchill had agreed with Evan’s world view. He could have left Hitler to continue his world domination unopposed because it was not England who was under attack by Germany.

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Face of the day

Churchill patting Rommel, a cocker spaniel owned by General Sir Bernard Montgomery (Monty) in Normandy in August 1944.

Churchill patting Rommel, a cocker spaniel owned by General Sir Bernard Montgomery (Monty) in Normandy in August 1944.

Yesterday was the anniversary of Winston Churchill’s death. He is a historical figure that I admire because he symbolises to me the determination and tenacity of the underdog. Britain was not winning the war when he became Prime Minister and he had to deal with defeat and failure but he never gave up. His speeches are still quoted today because of the way he used the spoken word to inspire and to energise the British people. One line from one of his speeches is as relevant today for the UK as it was back in 1940.

You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word: It is victory, victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory, however long and hard the road may be; for without victory, there is no survival.

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The law of the jungle

The law of the jungle is a law that applies even after the thin veneer of civilization has been applied to mankind.

Wars are won based on jungle law. Kill or be killed. Only the strong survive. We may want to forget this uncomfortable truth but it is a truth nevertheless. History shows us this over and over again.

Because Mankind is intelligent we have learned to forge short term and long term strategic relationships which enable the weak to become strong. Strength in numbers, strength forged by a common goal and usually a common enemy.

The historic meeting in Yalta between Winston Churchill, Franklin? Roosevelt? and Joseph Stalin is a great example of this.

n the grounds of the Livadia Palace, Yalta, during the Three Power Conference the British wartime Prime Minister Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (1874 - 1965), the 32nd President of the United States of America Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882 - 1945) and the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin (1879 - 1953) (Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili).   (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

On the grounds of the Livadia Palace, Yalta, during the Three Power Conference the British wartime Prime Minister Sir Winston Leonard Spencer Churchill (1874 – 1965), the 32nd President of the United States of America Franklin Delano Roosevelt (1882 – 1945) and the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin (1879 – 1953) (Iosif Vissarionovich Dzhugashvili). (Photo by Keystone/Getty Images)

At Yalta, important decisions were made regarding the future progress of the war and the postwar world.

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Photo Of The Day

Photograph: Evening Standard/Getty Images Mandy Rice-Davies, (centre, right), and Christine Keeler, (behind), surrounded by press photographers as they leave the Old Bailey during the trial of Dr Stephen Ward, a major figure in the Profumo Affair.

Photograph: Evening Standard/Getty Images
Mandy Rice-Davies, (centre, right), and Christine Keeler, (behind), surrounded by press photographers as they leave the Old Bailey during the trial of Dr Stephen Ward, a major figure in the Profumo Affair.

?Mandy Rice-Davies, Figure in Profumo Scandal, Dies at 70

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Thomson, John, born 1837 - died 1921. A 'November effigy' being paraded through the street, c.1877. At the time this photograph was taken it was common practice in early November to parade effigies of unpopular public figures as well as Guy Fawkes. In his notes to the photograph, Adolphe Smith refers to the effigy shown as being a 'meaningless monstrosity' created purely for the purposes of entertainment and profit.

Photo: Thomson, John, born 1837 – died 1921.
A ‘November effigy’ being paraded through the street, c.1877. At the time this photograph was taken it was common practice in early November to parade effigies of unpopular public figures as well as Guy Fawkes. In his notes to the photograph, Adolphe Smith refers to the effigy shown as being a ‘meaningless monstrosity’ created purely for the purposes of entertainment and profit.

November Effigies; Street Life in London

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