Bruce Hutton

Police planted evidence in the Crewe murders

Well, there certainly seems to be a problem with high profile crime investigations.  This is another dent to an already shabby credibility to a force being let down by a few individual ratbags

Police have apologised after a review found the investigation into the murders of Harvey and Jeanette Crewe was “sloppy”.

Arthur Allan Thomas was twice convicted for the murders of the Pukekawa farmers in 1970. He spent nine years in prison before being pardoned in 1979.

A report released by David Jones QC today found a slew of shortcomings in the police investigation into the case, including inadequate record keeping and a poorly managed crime scene.

These foul ups have led to better procedures these days, but dear God, what on earth were they doing back then?

The review identified the “distinct possibility” that a brass .22 cartridge case which was at the centre of the 1980 Royal Commission of Inquiry into the investigation “may be fabricated evidence, and if this is the case, that a member of police would have been responsible”.

The Royal Commission had found that the man who led the police inquiry into the murders – the late Bruce Hutton – planted a shell case, effectively framing Mr Thomas.

The general community surrounding this crime has never been uncomfortable with Thomas being the murderer.  They feel justice was done.   But of course, this sort of amateur hour stuff doesn’t help anyone.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Mike Bush confirmed as new Police Commissioner

Mike Bush has been confirmed as the new Police Commissioner.

The country’s next top police boss has been named as deputy commissioner Mike Bush.

Bush replaces outgoing police commissioner Peter Marshall.

The announcement was made today by Police Minister Anne Tolley who said Bush had been appointed after managing a change programme in police which contributed to a 17.4 per cent drop in recorded crimes over the past three years.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Mallard unrepentant

Trevor Mallard remains unrepentant following his shameful attack on Mike Bush at a select committee hearing…an attack that was enabled only after he fraudulently altered the whips form extending his allowed time at the committee.

Phil Goff meanwhile is apologetic. I wonder though when he will make a personal statement to the house correcting his misleading statement that he isn’t under investigation by Police.

Labour MP Phil Goff has admitted swearing under his breath in a Parliamentary committee was inappropriate.

He said it was “never appropriate” and “something I should never have done”.

A privileges complaint was laid last week with the Speaker of Parliament over Mr Goff’s swearing and the behaviour of Labour MP Trevor Mallard during the appearance of Police Commissioner Peter Marshall and Deputy Commissioner Mike Bush at the Law and Order Select Committee.

Mr Mallard stormed out of the committee during a fiery exchange about the eulogy given by Mr Bush at the funeral of former detective inspector Bruce Hutton in April.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Taping family funerals – without asking, a new low for David Fisher?

via the tipline

Disturbing news on Dotcom’s PR man David Fisher.

We all know how low David Fisher has previously stooped to in using unauthorised photographs, taken at a funeral, of Judith Collins and her son.

David Fisher wrote a scurrilous article about Judith Collins on Saturday. In that story he used a photograph obtained without the consent of the family, taken at David Wong-Tung’s mother’s funeral. That photo was supplied by Clinton Neville Bowerman.

At the time Fisher defended the use of the photograph and the story with numerous tweets. In one tweet he said that this was “how a real newspaper works”. That “real newspaper” though seems to have taken down the photo that they emblazoned all over their website on Saturday…perhaps they aren’t too happy with the sleazy and underhand way with which their top “investigative” reporter obtained that photo.

Now Fisher has been exchanging tweets with Trevor Mallard around the content of Mike Bush’s eulogy at the funeral of Bruce Hutton – and Mallard duly disgraced himself in a select committeeRead more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Mallard losing the plot, again, privileges complaint laid and now threatens top cop

Two events that are perhaps linked have led to Trevor Mallard once again losing the plot. Firstly John Banks has laid a complaint with the Privileges Committee about Mallard’s actions last week in parliament.

Act leader John Banks also revealed he laid a breach of privilege complaint against Labour’s Trevor Mallard last week after Mr Mallard strongly criticised the Speaker’s decision to allow United Future to retain its parliamentary entitlements while it sorted out its registration.

Mr Mallard described it in the debating chamber as “farcical” and left rather than be forced to withdraw and apologise for it.

Today before question time, Mr Mallard stood to withdraw and apologise, which Mr Carter said related to last week.

He said he was yet to make a decision on Mr Banks’ complaint, lodged last Friday, because he needed to first seek a response from Mr Mallard.

Mallard also described the decision by Speaker Carter as ‘corruption’.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Bruce Hutton dies

Bruce Hutton, a police detective in the Arthur Allan Thomas case has died:

The policeman found to have planted evidence that led to the wrongful conviction of Arthur Allan Thomas for the murders of Harvey and Jeannette Crewe has died.

The Herald has learned that former Detective Inspector Bruce Hutton, 83, died in Middlemore Hospital late on Sunday night after a short illness.

Mr Hutton was the officer in charge of the homicide inquiry after the Crewes were murdered in their home at Pukekawa in Waikato in 1970.

Mr Thomas was convicted of the crime in two trials before being pardoned.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.