Brunei

No religious tolerance in Somalia and Brunei: Christmas is illegal

Somalia has issued a ban on Christmas celebrations in the Muslim-majority country after the Southeast Asian sultanate of Brunei announced a similar prohibition earlier this month with the threat of five years in jail.

Sheikh Mohamed Khayrow, director general of Somalia’s religious affairs ministry, said on Tuesday that Christmas and New Year celebrations threatened the country’s Muslim faith.

“There should be no activity at all,” he told reporters, adding security forces had been ordered to break up any such festivities.

“All events related to Christmas and New Year celebrations are contrary to Islamic culture, which could damage the faith of the Muslim community.”

Let that sink in. ? There is no need for tolerance. ?In fact, Islam considers itself under threat from the mere existence of celebrating Christian holidays. ? Read more »

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The Banning of Christmas

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_gFgmXe3q1s

Sometimes we are our own worst enemy:

American college students have signed a petition to ban the racist song “White Christmas” from playing on radio stations, calling the song an offense to all colored people in its insistence on “white” being associated with the good and the beautiful. Thankfully, the petition was a complete farce by MRCTV?reporter Dan Joseph.

In a video posted Monday, Dan Joseph is shown pitching?several college students a petition to effectively ban Bing Crosby’s classic song “White Christmas” from playing on the radio.?Joseph ruses the unsuspecting students with various politically correct tropes like “‘White Christmas’ perpetuates the idea that white is naturally good” while shouting catch-phrases like “white supremacy is everywhere, even in your holiday songs.”

“Micro-aggressions” and the need for a “safe space” away from the horribly offensive song were also pronounced several times by Dan Joseph.

Some students didn’t take bait, laughing off the petition as ridiculous. Others, such as one black girl, jumped at the first utterance of the phrase “white supremacy in the holiday season.”

The buzz words and catch-phrases worked, because Joseph managed to get a total 18 signatures in just one hour, with students of all races?lining up to stick it to the white man.

Read more »

An email from a Kiwi teacher living offshore

David Cunliffe wants immigrants and former Kiwi teachers to fill the gaps his 2000 new teachers policy has created.

One such teacher emails:

Morning Cam,

Over the weekend I?ve unwittingly become one of the teachers Labour desperately needs to make up the 2000 extra they’ve promised.

I work in Brunei, make decent coin, can save, and can travel cheaply.? I’ve got 15 years experience, post-grad quals, and have worked in a range of unique schools from Kuwait to Laos to Kazakhstan as well as many years in NZ.

Frankly, there’s not a snowballs chance in hell I’d ever return to full time teaching in NZ.? Schools have become an unwilling conduit for solving all of society?s ills.? Teachers are expected to be social workers, counsellors, and doctors on a daily, week in week out basis with zero respite for staff simply wanting to plan, teach, assess, evaluate, plan…

I left NZ disillusioned with the profession as it stood.? The bulk of my time was taken up with behaviour management.? All the professional development I undertook (usually at my expense) was rendered useless by the sheer volume of time taken up having to manage the behaviour of wayward kids. ? Read more »

Brunei enters the stoning age…again

All those who clamour for shariah law should be careful what they wish for.

Brunei is planning to?return to the medieval modes of shariah law, with vicious punishments for extramarital sex and anti-Muslim defamation. It applies to every one in Brunei, not just to the muslim population.

Remember when we all thought historical events would push us toward greater rationality, moderation, and liberalism?

Well, on Tuesday, April 22, the tiny sultanate of Brunei planned to put into effect a new penal code that provides ?stoning to death? as the penalty for rape, adultery, sodomy, extramarital sexual relations (for Muslims), defamation of the Prophet Mohammed, insulting any verses of the Koran and Hadith, blasphemy, and declaring oneself a prophet or non-Muslim.

Oh, and robbery and murder. (Late Monday night Brunei delayed the implementation of the code, but an official said the punishments would begin ?in the very near future.?) ?? Read more »

Lucky Lusty Lenny doesn’t live in Brunei

The Sultan of Brunei has implemented new shariah laws to Brunei…Len Brown wouldn’t pass muster on these.

A new criminal law that could include penalties like amputation for theft and stoning for adultery will be enforced for Muslims in Brunei in six months, its ruling sultan announced.

Brunei?s Shariah Islamic court had previously handled mainly family-related disputes. The sultan has been hoping to implement the new law for years to bolster the influence of Islam in the tiny, oil-rich monarchy on Southeast Asia?s Borneo island.

Sultan Hassanal Bolkiah said the Shariah Penal Code should be regarded as a form of ?special guidance? from God and would be ?part of the great history? of Brunei.

?By the grace of Allah, with the coming into effect of this legislation, our duty to Allah is therefore being fulfilled,? the sultan said at a legal conference in Brunei?s capital.? Read more »

Did any of these munters demand Labour release details of any FTA’s they signed?

I see assorted whining lefties and useful idiots have all formed a campaign to lobby the government to breach international agreements about negotiations underway.

munters

I’ll bet not a single one of them…yes Russell Brown, you too…ever made a single demand of Labour to release details of FTAs being negotiated under Labour…not a single one.? Read more »

The Hypocrisy of NZ over Fiji, Ctd

On the one hand we have the Prime Minister blithely suggesting that we should continue to freeze out Fiji and on the other hand our Trade Minister talking up a storm about free trade agreements with less than democratic nations, showing once again our strange foreign policy hypocrisy to the world:

Trade Minister Tim Groser yesterday announced that New Zealand was joining an initiative to create a huge free trade region.

If the agreement succeeds it would cover an area with more than three billion people, 43 per cent of the world’s population.

Mr Groser has been in Cambodia this week for trade meetings hosted by Asean, the Association of Southeast Asian Nations.

The countries which have agreed to the initiative are the 10 Asean countries – Indonesia, Malaysia, Singapore, Brunei, Myanmar, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Vietnam and the Philippines – and six countries with which Asean has existing free trade agreements: China, India, Korea, Japan, Australia and New Zealand.

Let’s look at those countries shall we…since we insist on forcing Fiji to have a system of government like ours, and highlighting civil rights and free press and independent judiciary:

Indonesia: hardly the stand up country when it comes to human and civil rights. They occupied East Timor for more than 25 years, including massive civil rights abuses of the East Timorese population. They continue to fight seperatists in Aceh and have only had one direct presidential election since Suharto’s resignation, which was held in 2004.

Malaysia: Ostensibly a democracy but with ongoing persecution of opposition politicians in partiucular the persecution on trumped up charges of sodomy against Anwar Ibrahim, and a less than free media.Islamic fundamentalism is growing in Malaysia.

Singapore: Is barely a democracy:

The?People’s Action Party?has won every election since self-government in 1959, and governs on the basis of a strong state and prioritising collective welfare over individual rights such as freedom of speech, an approach that has attracted criticism from organisations such as?Freedom House.

That is an amazing string of electoral good luck. Tight government controls exist particularly with regards to freedom of speech and freedom of association:

?In 2011, in the?World Justice Project‘s?Rule of Law Index?Singapore was ranked in the top countries surveyed in “Order and Security”, “Absence of Corruption”, and “Effective Criminal Justice”. However, it scored very low for both “Freedom of Speech” and “Freedom of Assembly”.?All public gatherings of five or more people require police permits, and protests may only be legally held at?Speakers’ Corner.

Brunei: The personal fiefdom of teh Sultan of Brunei, with few if any democratic processes in place. The country has been under martial law since 1962. Despite a lack of democracy the government regularly fetes the Sultan of Brunei and allows him to maintain an extensive property portfolio in Auckland, and travel with freedom in his own jet which is often parked up at Auckland. Media are tightly controled:

The country has been given “Not Free” status by?Freedom House; press criticism of the government and monarchy is rare.[

Myanmar (Burma): A military dictatorship, where the NZ Government is more than happy for SOEs like Kordia to make millions from a government that is rife with human rights abuses and of course actively and violently?suppresses?the opposition.

The United Nations and several other organizations have reported consistent and systematic?human rights?violations in the country, including?genocide,child labour,?human trafficking?and a lack of?freedom of speech. In recent years the country and its military leadership have made huge concessions to democratic activists and are slowly improving relations with the major powers and the UN.

Thailand: Any government in?Thailand?serves at?the?pleasure of the King. They have had more coups since the formation of the country than any other in the region. Yet New Zealand already has a Free Trade Agreement with them. Since the country was founded in modern times in 1932, ironically by a coup, they have had coups and/or insurrections in 1932, 1933, 1938, 1947, 1948, 1949, 1951, 1957, ?and 1973.

The?history of?Thailand?from 1932 to 1973?was dominated by?military dictatorships?which were in power for much of the period.

The most recent coup was in 2006 when Thaksin Shinwatra was overthrown, and a in 2010 there was a “judicial coup”:

Immediately following what many media described as a “judicial coup”, a senior member of the Armed Forces met with factions of the governing coalition to get their members to join the opposition and the?Democrat Party?was able to form a government, a first for the party since 2001. The leader of the Democrat party, and former leader of the opposition,?Abhisit Vejjajiva?was appointed and sworn-in as the 27th?Prime Minister, together with the new cabinet on 17 December 2008.

In of April 2010, a set of new?protests?by the?Red Shirt?opposition movement resulted in 87 deaths (mostly civilian and some military) and 1,378 injured.?When the army tried to disperse the protesters on 10 April 2010, the army was met with automatic gunfire, grenades, and fire bombs from the opposition faction in the army, known as the “watermelon”. This resulted in the army returning fire with rubber bullets and some live ammunition. During the time of the “red shirt” protests against the government, there have been numerous grenade and bomb attacks against government offices and the homes of government officials. Grenades were fired at protesters, that were protesting against the “red shirts” and for the government, by unknown gunmen killing one pro-government protester, the government stated that the Red Shirts were firing the weapons at civilians.

There is far more of a coup culture in Thailand but we are yet to see travel bans for members of the government, travel warnings or sanctions, instead New Zealand gave them a FTA.

Cambodia: is recovering from?the?legacy of the Khmer Rouge regime and subsequent Vietnamese occupation.

Hun Sen and his government have seen much controversy. Hun Sen was a former Khmer Rouge commander who was originally installed by the Vietnamese and, after the Vietnamese left the country, maintains his?strong man?position by violence and oppression when deemed necessary.?In 1997, fearing the growing power of his co-Prime Minister, Prince Norodom Ranariddh, Hun launched a?coup, using the army to purge Ranariddh and his supporters. Ranariddh was ousted and fled to Paris while other opponents of Hun Sen were arrested, tortured and some summarily executed.

In addition to political oppression, the Cambodian government has been accused of corruption in the sale of vast areas of land to foreign investors resulting in the eviction of thousands of villagers?as well as taking bribes in exchange for grants to exploit Cambodia’s oil wealth and mineral resources.?Cambodia is consistently listed as one of the most corrupt governments in the world.

Laos: A single party communist dictatorship. Their human rights record is appalling. no democracy here, no press freedoms, no indepedent judiciary…but welcome into a Free Trade Agreement while we shun Fiji.

Vietnam: A Single party communist dictatorship controlled by the military. Media freedoms are non existant:

Vietnam’s media sector is regulated by the government in accordance with the 2004 Law on Publication.?It is generally perceived that Vietnam’s media sector is controlled by the government to follow the official communist party line, though some newspapers are relatively outspoken.?The?Voice of Vietnam?is the official state-run national radio broadcasting service, broadcasting internationally via shortwave using rented transmitters in other countries, and providing broadcasts from its website.?Vietnam Television?is the national television broadcasting company.

Since 1997, Vietnam has extensively regulated public?Internet?access, using both legal and technical means. The resulting lockdown is widely referred to as the “Bamboo?Firewall.”?The collaborative project?OpenNet Initiative?classifies Vietnam’s level of online political censorship to be “pervasive”,?while?Reporters without Borders?considers Vietnam to be one of 15 global “internet enemies”.

Philippines: The only real democracy in the countries listed above. Still not without a history of military control at some points and some coup culture.

When you see it all listed there you really wonder why we continue to freeze out Fiji when it appears we are quite prepared to deal with Military Dictatorships, Communist states and corrupt demagogues. It must be interesting to try and justify all that inside MFaT while at the same time running the silly?policies?we have against Fiji.