Camel

Camel Jockey Disease found in US

They couldn’t used CJD for the disease, Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease already has that so they called it MERS (Middle East Respiratory Syndrome).

Nevertheless Camel Jockey Disease has made it to the US.

Along a stretch of rust-belt suburbia in Indiana, the Community Hospital in Munster now claims the dubious distinction of being the first U.S. facility to admit a patient with the deadly Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS).

State and federal health officials confirmed the first U.S. case of the virus on Friday. The patient, a male healthcare worker, had traveled to Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, and began exhibiting symptoms upon his return to the United States, they said.

Separately, Saudi officials on Saturday said the rate of infections was on the rise in the country, where MERS was first discovered in 2012. The total number of cases in the kingdom is 396, of whom more than a quarter have died.

At Community Hospital, however, the news did not seem to create panic among Munster residents soon after it was broadcast on local news outlets. The emergency room was bustling with patients on Friday night, and every one of the nearly 20 seats in the dimly lit waiting area was taken.

“Nobody’s freaking out or anything, at least that I can see. Maybe they’re all wearing masks upstairs, but not down here,” said 24-year-old Michael Gibson, of nearby Hammond, Indiana, who had brought his girlfriend to the hospital for treatment.

He said he saw local news coverage of the MERS finding earlier that day, but trusted that the hospital took proper precautions to protect its patients. A previous visitor to the Community ER, he said that the number of patients seemed no lighter than normal.

The MERS patient had traveled via a British Airways flight on April 24 from Riyadh to London, changing planes at Heathrow airport to fly to Chicago. From there, he boarded a bus to Indiana. Munster, which is close to Indiana’s border with Illinois, is about a 45-minute drive from downtown Chicago.

Health officials in Britain were contacting any passengers who may have sat next to the patient. U.S. health authorities stressed the case represents a very low risk to the public.

But concerns remain, given how little is know about the way MERS is spread, other than it can be transmitted between people who are in close contact. That has made healthcare workers particularly susceptible to falling ill with the MERS virus, for which there is no treatment.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

King David wasn’t a camel jockey

Helen Clark might have been a camel jockey but Kind David probably wasn't

Helen Clark might have been a camel jockey but Kind David probably wasn’t

New evidence suggests that domesticated camels haven;t been around for as long as previously thought and certainly not in the time of the kings from the bible.

There are too many camels in the Bible, out of time and out of place.

Camels probably had little or no role in the lives of such early Jewish patriarchs as Abraham, Jacob and Joseph, who lived in the first half of the second millennium B.C., and yet stories about them mention these domesticated pack animals more than 20 times. Genesis 24, for example, tells of Abraham’s servant going by camel on a mission to find a wife for Isaac.

These anachronisms are telling evidence that the Bible was written or edited long after the events it narrates and is not always reliable as verifiable history. These camel stories “do not encapsulate memories from the second millennium,” said Noam Mizrahi, an Israeli biblical scholar, “but should be viewed as back-projections from a much later period.”  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

Camel Farts will now destroy the planet

An Australian Government committee has reluctantly rejected a cunning plan that could have saved the planet and made some smart operators nice and rich:

“A proposal to earn millions of carbon credits by shooting camels from helicopters and trucks has been rejected by the Australian government, in part due to concerns over animal welfare.

Northwest Carbon, a company that invests in projects that cut emissions of greenhouse gases, had sought up to 1 million carbon offsets a year from killing hundreds of thousands of camels – and using the carcasses for human and pet food.

They were brought over by Indian settlers as a means of transport in the 1840s, but through excessive belching and flatulence they are expected to emit methane equivalent to 2 million tonnes of carbon dioxide a year by 2020, similar output to a small power plant.”

It looks increasingly like the carbon tax scheme was actually drawn up the Monty Python scriptwriters.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.