campaigning

Snowflake left moans about dirty politics, after their own dirty politics sets precedent

The snowflake left all fought hard for the right of a video producer to mock the government,  but now that a decision has been made in the courts they are aghast that the decision opens up New Zealand for third party attack ads…like the very one they supported in the first place.

They are crying a river of tears over it.

Opposition parties fear attack advertisements will be a feature of this year’s general election campaign.

So it was OK at the last election when the attack ads were against the government?

In October, the Court of Appeal ruled the Electoral Commission was wrong to have banned the satirical Planet Key song from being broadcast before the 2014 election.

The decision appears to have made it possible for private organisations and individuals to run election advertisements on radio and television.   Read more »

Print is dead

You know print is dead when politicians stop advertising their campaigns in it.

It’s been said a number of times from “Ghostbusters” in 1984 to a more recent Onion article where there was an obituary under the headline “Print, Dead At 1803.” Now, it’s true — at least for 95 percent of campaigns. Print is, in fact, dead.

Despite its passing, most campaigns from Senate through state House still spend a disproportionate amount of time strategizing about how to deal with newspaper editors and reporters. We would also argue that “earned media” campaign strategy focusing on all media outlets is about to be dead, too.

Before you start ticking off the exceptions, the main point we would submit is that campaigns and candidates have to reassess how much time they put into earned media strategy, versus social media strategy, versus fundraising versus direct-voter contact. We would argue in most races that aren’t for president, almost none of the candidate’s time should be spent dealing with the media.    Read more »

Paid to Win – Simon Lusk’s Guide to Campaigning Part II Which Party?

Simon Lusk is one of the few full time political campaigners in New Zealand, and is releasing a practical guide to campaigning in New Zealand, “Paid to Win“, one chapter at a time.

His second chapter is titled “Which Party” and gives advice on which party aspiring politicians or political activists should join.

This chapter deals with which party to join, why minor parties never effect real change, why a safe seat matters, and other factors in deciding when and where a candidate should run.

Simon’s views on the likelihood of a successful career in a minor party are spot on, and while the Greens will howl with rage his comments about them are spot on.

When I first started getting to know good political operators inside Labour I mentioned that Labour had an inherent advantage because they had the Greens.

Under MMP National do not have any strong coalition partners, while Labour have the Greens.

The response to this statement was telling. I was asked emphatically, “Have you ever worked with the Greens?” I had not, but filed this away for future reference.  Read more »

Paid to Win – Coming soon

simon-puppies-106-of-144

Simon Lusk Photo/ Supplied

Coming Soon from Whaleoil Media

Paid to Win

A Campaign Professional’s Guide to Campaigning in New Zealand

By Simon Lusk

Simon Lusk is New Zealand’s only full time professional political campaign manager. He is paid to win campaigns. This book is a guide for aspiring candidates and campaign managers outlining what works and what does not work in campaigns in New Zealand.

The book will be released for purchase via Amazon as a Kindle Book one chapter at a time.     Read more »

Tagged:

Playing politics like Fiji plays rugby

Embed from Getty Images

I am with a group of 9 overseas bloggers and journalists here in Israel and obviously people are inquisitive, especially when you leave organised events to go do television interviews, so they Google.

Nicky Hager would probably call that some sort of Zionist conspiracy.

Nonetheless they Google and so are asking a few questions about what it is like to be involved in political debate in New Zealand.

One blogger, Anton Diaz, from the Philippines, plus a couple of other Filipinos expressed to me how New Zealand seems to know nothing about dirty politics, after all, no one  gets shot in drive by shootings for daring to express a different political opinion. This is apparently what happens in their country. In fact people get shot for much, much less.

So they asked why I play so hard. Those are my words, paraphrasing an interesting discussion over lunch.

I thought about that.

I play politics like Fiji or Samoa plays rugby.   Read more »

A letter to a hoarding vandal

A reader emails about this hoarding vandalism:

unnamed-1

Hi Cam and Crew,

The message “I’m an intelligent climate change voter. Are you?” (picture attached) has been plastered over many right-of-centre hoardings in Northcote. Since there the vandal(s) are unknown, I’m hoping you’d be willing to post my open letter in response…

My answer is “Yes, I am… and the Greens are about the *last* party I’d vote for.”    Read more »

Tagged:

Local Government Success Story – Simon Lusk

8717507Campaign manager and staunch fiscal conservative Simon Lusk managed to pull together a coalition of people to kick out incumbents on the dodgy Hawke’s Bay Regional Council.

The word from Hawkes Bay is that Simon ran a fearless campaign exposing the truth about the ratbag councillors who all got the arse card. No one is ever quite sure how Simon wins campaigns as he reckons publicity gets in the way of fishing and shooting, but some how there huge red signs across Hawkes Bay calling for change, there was a major tractor protest by growers calling for change, a sitting councillor was awarded New Zealand’s Dodgiest Local Body Politician, forty five iwi members spent two days getting the vote out and Simon’s mates all won.   Read more »

This bloke could school Trev on the finer arts of political advertising

Labour seem to be out of ideas, perhaps they could contract Henry Heng in from WA to help Trev with strategy. This is his campaign video, made with a budget appropriate for a party of broken arses like Labour.

Who knew an internet sensation would be born when the West Australian election campaign crossed paths with a Christian music enthusiast and would-be campaign manager?

Not political newcomer Henry Heng, nor his party, Family First, but his Youtube campaign video has attracted international attention and looks poised to go viral with more than 10,000 hits.

A year ago, the 57-year-old businessman and North Metro Upper candidate had no interest in Youtube, or political film making.  Read more »

More illegal campaigning, Ctd

These are appearing all over Auckland Central, these are from Richmond Road in Ponsonby. It shows the despicable levels the leftwing will stoop to. No authorisation, illegal, and wrong.

The slogans are close enough to Labour’s that it could easily be sheeted home to them.

Why the NRA is Great

The NRA are great because they win campaigns. Their latest email to members says:

In the past, we’ve won countless legislative battles against anti-gunners, because politicians know that you’ll vote them out of office if they attack your Right to Keep and Bear Arms.

Bill Clinton gave them credit for knocking over the speaker in 1994:

“ The NRA had a great night. They beat both Speaker Tom Foley and Jack Brooks, two of the ablest members of Congress, who had warned me this would happen. Foley was the first Speaker to be defeated in more than a century. Jack Brooks had supported the NRA for years and had led the fight against the assault weapons ban in the House, but as chairman of the Judiciary Committee he had voted for the overall crime bill even after the ban was put into it. The NRA was an unforgiving master: one strike and you’re out. The gun lobby claimed to have defeated nineteen of the twenty-four members on its hit list. They did at least that much damage and could rightly claim to have made Gingrich the House Speaker. ”
—Bill Clinton, My Life pp 629-30

The NRA has 4.3 million members and these members are regularly told which politicians need knocking over. The grass roots are supported by professional campaigners and together they get politicians they don’t like beaten.

In a tight Presidential race in 2012 the way the NRA breaks could be decisive in the end result. Usually they would support the Republican candidate, and they have not liked Obama much, but Obama can point to record gun sales to show he is a pro-gun president.

Tagged: