cancer

Fines for offering orange juice in California

The California state legislature passed a bill this week requiring restaurants to make the default drinks for kids’ menus either water or milk reports AntiMedia. Quote.

According to the text of S.B. 1192:

“This bill would require a restaurant, as defined, that sells a children’s meal that includes a beverage, to make the default beverage water, sparkling water, or flavored water, as specified, or unflavored milk or a nondairy milk alternative, as specified. The bill would not prohibit a restaurant’s ability to sell, or a customer’s ability to purchase, an alternative beverage if the purchaser requests one.”

The bill does not prohibit restaurants from selling other drinks to children, but it forces them to offer water or milk first. The penalties are as follows:
Read more »

Tagged:

Guest Post – “Unfortunate Experiment”

A guest post by Frances Denz.


I was interested in the programme on the “Unfortunate Experiment” on Sunday last week.  It traversed the issues, particularly in light of the book being launched which has been written by a someone who had been a junior doctor and an unwilling participant in the processes at the time.

A small component of the TV  programme was a strident condemnation of an academic whose research demonstrated that there was some validity in the work that Professors Green and Bonham were doing.  Because so many women were harmed, the whole rationale for the research was treated with contempt.  But like so many things, there is a but!   Read more »

The nature of suffering, strength, love and faith

Normally it’s not the done thing to drag your mood down, but this is a remarkable story.

Why do some of us sail through life without any significant challenges, while others appear to have more than their fair share?  Why does this leave a sense of life being unfair?  And what kind of God would do this?  Twice?

 

Tagged:

The UKs most hated word is not fit for publication

When words like ' Islam' topped the rankings in the United Kingdom, the organizers were forced to call off the #OneWordMap initiative.

According to its blog, despite thousands of people taking part, Oxford Dictionaries was forced to axe its #OneWordMap initiative due to ‘severe misuse. (Photo: Pixabay)

 

The Oxford Dictionary ran a campaign in the UK to find out which English word was most hated. The politically correct did not like what they found out so the campaign was abruptly cancelled. As always when people try to hide the truth there will be a backlash to get the truth out. I think we in New Zealand should be aware of what this hated word is. We should not only know what it is we should ask searching questions about why it is that this word has inspired so much hatred. I am glad that the word that is hated is not personal and does not refer to an individual. This hatred is not directed at people but at the ideas and laws that this word represents.

If you want to find out what this word is that was so hated and politically incorrect that the campaign was halted, click read more.

Read more »

Photo of the Day

There was a long period of time, almost a year, during which I never looked in a mirror. It wasn’t easy, for I’d never suspected just how omnipresent are our own images. I began by merely avoiding mirrors, but by the end of the year I found myself with an acute knowledge of the reflected image, its numerous tricks and wiles, how it can spring up at any moment: a glass tabletop, a well-polished door handle, a darkened window, a pair of sunglasses, a restaurant’s otherwise magnificent brass-plated coffee machine sitting innocently by the cash register.

Lucy Grealy: There was a long period of time, almost a year, during which I never looked in a mirror. It wasn’t easy, for I’d never suspected just how omnipresent are our own images. I began by merely avoiding mirrors, but by the end of the year I found myself with an acute knowledge of the reflected image, its numerous tricks and wiles, how it can spring up at any moment: a glass tabletop, a well-polished door handle, a darkened window, a pair of sunglasses, a restaurant’s otherwise magnificent brass-plated coffee machine sitting innocently by the cash register.

The Face of Pain

Lucy Grealy, whose 1994 memoir, “Autobiography of a Face,” was a fearless account of growing up with a disfigurement caused by cancer, died Dec. 18, 2002, in New York City. She was 39. She had accidentally taken an overdose of heroin. Her life had been hard, but she had also experienced more joy than many.

Her fiercely honest account of this tortured existence and what it was like for her to be “ugly” in a society obsessed with physical beauty captured national attention. For a time she was the toast of talk shows and literary circles. However, she suffered from depression. She had been staying at the home of friends at the time of her death.

Born Lucinda Margaret Grealy (pronounced GRAY-lee) in Dublin, Ireland, she was one of five children. Her father, Desmond, helped found RTE, the Irish national broadcasting network, before he moved the family to Spring Valley, N.Y., when Lucy was 4.

Grealy was diagnosed with Ewing’s sarcoma, a rare and often lethal form of cancer that began as a dental cyst. Starting when she was 9, Grealy had chemotherapy and radiation treatments as often as five times each week for five years. It dissolved nearly half of her jaw bone.

Grealy wrote of her nine-year-old self facing cancer, “Every day I’d have some test, and it never occurred to me to ask what was going on, what the tests were for, what the results were.” We all get caught up in systematic processes, like medical diagnoses or job searches, and neglect to stop to think about what’s really going on and what the results will mean in the long run. We’re swept along by a lot of life’s goings-on.

Over the next 15 years she had 30 surgeries, hoping each time to restore her once-pretty face. Most of the operations were failures.

Grealy’s memoir about the long years leading up to her imperfect face launched a book tour and a spate of articles about her. Interviewers invariably described her large, bright eyes as expressing a type of wisdom formed by pain.

In the book, Lucy detailed her quest to reclaim her jaw, disfigured by cancer. Suddenly, she was the toast of literary New York, beloved for her quick wit and wild streak, saluted for her grit. But her endless surgeries left her so weak, impoverished, and dependent on drugs that even her dearest friends couldn’t save her.

Read more »

Looks like another Labour policy is gone as government proposes funding Keytruda

The government has gazzumped Labour by authorising Pharmac to part-fund Keytruda, and all without having to entertain Big Pharma in their offices like Labour did.

Melanoma patients are likely to get a second drug treatment option under a new proposal to provide state funding of Keytruda.

Pharmac, the Government’s drug funding agency, has today issued a consultation document proposing to pay for Keytruda from September 1.

This follows Pharmac’s earlier decision to fund Keytruda’ rival Opdivo from this Friday. Both are high-cost cancer drugs in a new class of immunotherapy medicines, called PD-1 inhibitors which are extending the lives of some advanced-melanoma patients who have no other treatment options.

Pharmac says in the consultation notice on its website that it has “now reached a commercially favourable provisional agreement” with the maker of Keytruda (pembrolizumab), Merck Sharp and Dohme, and is seeking feedback on the proposal, which also involves two other drugs.   Read more »

Key absolutely destroys Little over Pharmac, Keytruda and the TPP

The major objection about the TPP was that Pharmac would have more expenses buying drugs.

Key said he’d give them more money – individuals would not pay more at the Chemist.  Check.

The Keytruda people and Little got together to run a big campaign against Key as an uncaring bastard letting people die of cancer.

Well, that lunch cost the Keytruda idiots dearly as the contract has gone to a competitor.  People get a melanoma drug.  Check.   Your move, Andy.

Drug-buying agency Pharmac has confirmed funding for advanced skin cancer drug, Opdivo, following a public outcry over a lack of options for melanoma sufferers.

In December, Pharmac announced it would not fund melanoma drug pembrolizumab, also known as Keytruda, saying there was not enough evidence to show it works.

Melanoma campaigners have been calling for funding for new treatments, and Pharmac today announced nivolumab (brand name Opdivo) will be fully funded from July 1.

It follows extra funding from the Government in this year’s Budget.   Read more »

Tagged:

Photo Of The Day

Norman Baker, Holding A Subjects Head, At A Demonstration Of His Hypnosis Treatment, 1900. Born November 27, 1882, in Muscatine, Iowa, Norman Baker, was the last of 10 children delivered to wealthy factory owner John Baker and his wife Frances. Young Norman left school at the age of 16 to work as a machinist in his father's factory. Baker became fascinated, however, by a hypnotist act that he saw as part of a vaudeville show that had traveled to his small, rural town. Baker soon began his own vaudeville act in 1900, called The Madame Pearl Tangley show, where he had a beautiful woman "read" the minds of spectators in the audience.

Norman Baker, Holding A Subjects Head, At A Demonstration Of His Hypnosis Treatment, 1900. Born November 27, 1882, in Muscatine, Iowa, Norman Baker, was the last of 10 children delivered to wealthy factory owner John Baker and his wife Frances. Young Norman left school at the age of 16 to work as a machinist in his father’s factory. Baker became fascinated, however, by a hypnotist act that he saw as part of a vaudeville show that had traveled to his small, rural town. Baker soon began his own vaudeville act in 1900, called The Madame Pearl Tangley show, where he had a beautiful woman “read” the minds of spectators in the audience.

Crescent Hotel History

 Norman Baker Struck Snake Oil

Norman Baker had worked at a myriad of careers—magician, inventor, radio evangelist—in his lifetime, none of which qualified him to be a medical doctor. But this didn’t stop him from opening up a medical practice in his home state of Iowa and later in 1937, when he had been run out of town, in a hotel in Eureka Springs, Arkansas. The Crescent Hotel, where the notorious “Doctor” Baker treated his patients and promised to cure them of cancer, still exists after all these years. Most of Dr. Baker’s patients, however, barely lasted a few weeks under his care…

Perched on the crest of West Mountain above the Victorian village of Eureka Springs, Arkansas is the historic 1886 Crescent Hotel & Spa. The 78-room resort hotel is not only known as one of America’s most distinctive and historic destinations, but it is also renowned for a bevy of spirits that are said to continue to walk upon the palatial grounds.

Built by the Eureka Springs Improvement Company and the Frisco Railroad, the hotel was designed by Isaac L. Taylor, a well-known Missouri architect who had designed a number of famous buildings in St. Louis. Twenty-seven acres at the north end of West Mountain was chosen for its majestic location overlooking the valley.

It was an important time in Eureka Springs’ history as the “healing waters” of the Ozarks had become well known across the nation. People from near and far were swarming to the area in hopes of curing their ailments and easing their pains. The developers of the Crescent Hotel & Spa planned to take advantage of these many travelers by building the most luxurious resort in the country.

Powell Clayton, a former governor of Arkansas from 1868 to 1870, formed the Eureka Springs Improvement Company in hopes of taking advantage of this prosperous period. Along with a number of other investors, the Frisco Railroad joined in on the plan, knowing that the resort could only spur their business.

Numerous stonemasons were brought in from Ireland to begin the construction in 1884. Due to the density of the magnesium limestone used to build the hotel, special wagons were constructed to move the massive pieces of stone from the quarry site on the White River. Designed in an eclectic array of architectural styles, the masons built 18 inch walls, a number of towers, overhanging balconies, and a massive stone fireplace in the lobby.

Read more »

Urologists told to stop taking the piss

Urologists are being told to stop taking the piss with their fees.

Urologists charging excessively high fees for crucial operations including prostate cancer surgery have been warned to rein it in.

The Urological Society of Australia and New Zealand is aware a small number of urologists are quoting inflated out-of-pocket fees for surgery without proper justification, president Mark Frydenberg said on Sunday.

Someone is pissy.   Read more »

It is never too late

I am only 24 years old, yet I have actually already chosen my last tie. It’s the one that I will wear on my funeral a few months from now. It may not match my suit, but I think it’s perfect for the occasion.

The cancer diagnosis came too late to give me at least a tenuous hope for a long life, but I realized that the most important thing about death is to ensure that you leave this world a little better than it was before you existed with your contributions. The way I’ve lived my life so far, my existence or more precisely the loss of it, will not matter because I have lived without doing anything impactful.

Before, there were so many things that occupied my mind. When I learned how much time I had left, however, it became clear which things are really important. So, I am writing to you for a selfish reason. I want to give meaning to my life by sharing with you what I have realized:

Don’t waste your time on work that you don’t enjoy. It is obvious that you cannot succeed in something that you don’t like. Patience, passion, and dedication come easily only when you love what you do.

It’s stupid to be afraid of others’ opinions. Fear weakens and paralyzes you. If you let it, it can grow worse and worse every day until there is nothing left of you, but a shell of yourself. Listen to your inner voice and go with it. Some people may call you crazy, but some may even think you’re a legend.

Read more »

Tagged: