Carbon credit

Green ratbags dudding elderly and bewildered out of hard earned cash

Is there no limit to the predations of green ratbags. It seems they have been preying on the elderly and dudding them out of cash selling worthless carbon credits.

I was expecting to see Kennedy Graham’s name in the list of deluded pensioners caught up in another green scam.

More than a dozen companies that “preyed on older people” through carbon credit scams have been closed by the industry’s regulator, a minister has announced.

Nineteen firms that attracted investments of nearly £24m from more than 1,500 people by offering “worthless” carbon credits – or Certified Emission Reductions (CERs) – were wound up by the Insolvency Service in the last 15 months.

Consumer minister Jo Swinson said the offending companies made money from carbon credit scams, which see small investors promised huge returns for trading permits that offer corporations the right to emit one tonne of carbon dioxide.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Camel Farts will now destroy the planet

An Australian Government committee has reluctantly rejected a cunning plan that could have saved the planet and made some smart operators nice and rich:

“A proposal to earn millions of carbon credits by shooting camels from helicopters and trucks has been rejected by the Australian government, in part due to concerns over animal welfare.

Northwest Carbon, a company that invests in projects that cut emissions of greenhouse gases, had sought up to 1 million carbon offsets a year from killing hundreds of thousands of camels – and using the carcasses for human and pet food.

They were brought over by Indian settlers as a means of transport in the 1840s, but through excessive belching and flatulence they are expected to emit methane equivalent to 2 million tonnes of carbon dioxide a year by 2020, similar output to a small power plant.”

It looks increasingly like the carbon tax scheme was actually drawn up the Monty Python scriptwriters.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Green Scams, Ctd

The time must surely come when even the Green Taliban will wake up and realise the mad, corrupt, carbon trading scheme is a monstrous failure.

In the latest in a long series of smart traders gaming the dimwitted bureaucrats, an Irish trading company has been pulled up after revelations that it planned to make $32 billion trading indigenous Amazon tribes’ carbon credits.

Celestial Green, the Dublin carbon credits business involved in deals with indigenous tribes in the Amazon, at one stage envisaged its rights there creating credits with a value of up to $32 billion (€24 billion), according to filings to the US Securities and Exchange Commission (SEC).

A spokesman for the company said yesterday it was “surprised” that a case was being taken in Brazil against one of its deals there.

A federal attorney in the Brazilian state of Rondonia filed a lawsuit on December 11th which seeks to cancel a contract signed by Celestial Green Ventures and the Awo Xo Hwara indigenous community.

As part of the deal, the Irish company agreed to pay the local group $13 million over 30 years for the rights to explore carbon credits in an area of 260,000 hectares of rainforest.

“We currently have seven other projects which are being developed with indigenous communities in Brazil. As far as we are aware, only the Awo Xo Hwara agreement has had an application submitted by the prosecutor.”

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Maori want to tax whitey for ETS

When will it ever end?

Maori wanting to tax whitey for every perceived grievance they can dream up:

 The peak Maori body advising the government on climate change issues says the weak provisions intended for the Emissions Trading Scheme are robbing Maori of hundreds of millions of dollars by depressing the value of New Zealand carbon credits attached to Maori forestry holdings.

The comments coincide with the value of a New Zealand Unit (NZU) dropping back below $3, a historic low point, for the second time in a month, as a glut of European carbon credits combines with New Zealand’s policy to allow local greenhouse gas emissions to be offset by unlimited foreign-sourced carbon credits.

Of course the solution will be to thrown millions at them in “compensation”.  And they will end up selling them to rich Americans or Chinese anyway.

When the Treaty of Waitangi was signed not even a taniwha could have predicted a trade to develop in thin air.

 

 

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Chart of the Day

Carbon markets are rooted. Is anyone surprised at this graph?

WHAT would you say about a market that has helped reduce carbon emissions by a billion tonnes in seven years, attracted $215 billion of green investments to developing countries (more than any private environmental fund) and cut the cost of climate-change mitigation by $3.6 billion? The answer, to judge by a United Nations panel looking into the workings of the Clean Development Mechanism (CDM) is: you’d say it is a shambles.

The CDM was set up under the Kyoto protocol to get developing countries to do their bit to reduce carbon emissions. The mechanism allows projects that reduce greenhouse-gas emissions in poor countries to earn a carbon credit (a “certified emission reduction”, or CER) for each tonne of carbon dioxide avoided. The credits can be sold to firms in rich countries which are obliged under Kyoto to cut their emissions. The idea was to encourage carbon saving where it was cheapest (ie, in developing countries), increasing efficiency.

The trouble is that the supply of credits has far outstripped demand. The one-billionth CER was issued on September 7th. But the largest greenhouse-gas emitters either did not ratify the Kyoto protocol (America) or were not obliged by it to cut emissions (China and India). That has left Europe as the main source of demand for credits, and the CDM has become a sort of annex to Europe’s cap-and-trade scheme, the Emissions Trading System. But the euro crisis has reduced industrial activity (cutting pollution) and European firms were anyway given overly generous carbon quotas under the cap-and-trade scheme. So carbon prices have collapsed, falling from $20 a tonne in August 2008 to below $5 now (see chart).

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Greens and nuclear power

The Telegraph

Tom Chivers attempts and fails to understand greens opposition to nuclear power:

I don’t like the idea of being “fundamentally opposed” to one of the most obvious available options for keeping our lights on. If it is shown to be safe and economic, then we should use it. It’s not a moral issue; it’s just one more tool, which we can use well or badly, safely or unsafely. Also: how can an energy technology be “elitist”? I literally don’t know what that means. Is it elitist because it’s hi-tech and third-world countries can’t easily make their own? Well, so are iPads, then, and Toyota Priuses. Or does the word “elitist” just mean “bad” in Green-land, in the same way that “natural” means “good”? [Edit: I can’t believe I didn’t pick up on “undemocratic” as well. Since when are power stations democratic institutions?]

As for it not being renewable: well, neither is sunlight or the wind, if you’re taking a sufficiently long view. Eventually the Sun will consume the last of its hydrogen and expand into a red giant, probably blasting the Earth to its constituent atoms as it does so. But that’s quite a long way off, so we don’t worry about that. In the shorter but still decently long term, even if no more uranium deposits are found (although they will be) and no more efficient ways of using it developed (although they will be), “total identified resources are sufficient for over 100 years of supply”, according to the IAEA. That ain’t nothing.

“Carbon neutral” is a bit of a red herring as well in this case. It’s true, nuclear power is not carbon neutral. But it’s much less carbon positive, if that makes sense, than fossil fuels. The perfect is the enemy of the good, as the saying goes: just because something isn’t the best possible, doesn’t mean you should ignore it if it’s an improvement over what is available. Furthermore, there is potential to improve the carbon emissions of nuclear; if it is made economically attractive to do so, companies will do it themselves. Targeted carbon taxes, or an auction of carbon credits, would work; certainly the latter did for industrial sulphur dioxide emissions.

Of course once rpesented with all that the Green types fall back on the “safety” issue. But that too is a fatuous argument:

It’s about safety. Nuclear power is unsafe. Look at Chernobyl, look at Three Mile Island, look at Fukushima. It’s dangerous, as the Greens say, and its cost, dangers and waste will be “passed on to future generations”.

But as Prof Paddy Regan says in our paper today, that’s false. Chernobyl killed about 50 people (28 people in the immediate weeks after; an estimated 19, according to the WHO, died of radiation-induced cancers in the following 20 years). Three Mile Island killed, and indeed harmed, precisely nobody. And Fukushima was the most ridiculous of all: as a vast earthquake and tsunami killed 15,000 people, the world’s attention was focused on a meltdown in a 40-year-old reactor which, again, killed no one at all.

How many have died from other energy sources?

Meanwhile, in the last 40 years, tens of thousands of people have been killed by failures at hydroelectric dams; hundreds more have died in coal mines, and of course thousands every year in the US alone from respiratory problems caused by fossil fuels. But the fear of “radiation”, evident in the nonsense scares about “electrosmog”, trump the very real dangers of other energy sources.

Right so how about we get ourselves some nuclear plants and have cheap abundant energy, please.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

India joins China in revolt against EU emissions charges

The Telegraph

India has joined China in rejecting their stupid carbon charges for airlines and threatening retribution:

The threat of an aerospace trade war between Europe and the rest of the world has escalated after India joined China in threatening retaliation over the European Commission’s carbon emissions charges.

Chinese airlines have cancelled $14bn (£8.8bn) of orders with European aircraft manufacturer Airbus following the introduction of the charges and a senior Indian official has now warned there are “lots of measures” that India could take if the EC does not back down.

“The question is, are you [the European Union] provoking the world into a trade war?’,” the official told Reuters.

The EU Emissions Trading Scheme (ETS) requires airlines flying to or from Europe to buy carbon permits to offset their emissions from January 1 this year. However, non-European governments are furious that the charges cover the entire flight and not just European aerospace.

It is understood that India has told its airlines not to buy carbon credits from Europe or share emissions data, although it has not ordered the cancellation of orders from Airbus, which dominates the Asian aerospace market. India is also prepared to impose steep charges on European airlines to fly into India if Indian airlines are blocked from flying into Europe because of the ETS. “We have the power of the economy. We are not bleeding as they are,” the Indian official added.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.