Cartoon

The Australian and Cartoonist Bill Leak fight back against Aussie HRC

bill-leak-cartoon

In Australia, The Australian and their cartoonist Bill Leak are under investigation for the cartoon shown above.

The same thing happened here in New Zealand. The publisher was Whale Oil Beef Hooked and the cartoonist was Boomslang. Fortunately our Human Rights Commission is a toothless organisation and I simply ignored their bleating and that of the complainants.

The Australian and Bill Leak are fighting back against the Human Rights Commission.

Lawyers for cartoonist Bill Leak and The Australian have accused the Human Rights Commission of outright bias and warned of legal action to restrain the federal body and its head, Gillian Triggs, from investigating a drawing.

The newspaper yesterday ­issued its formal legal response to the commission after The ­Australian and Leak were put on notice that they were being ­investigated for alleged “racial hatred under the Racial Discrimination Act” for a cartoon ­depicting the neglect of indig­enous children by their parents.

The lawyers for Leak and the newspaper state that, if necessary, they will produce evidence to ­establish the August 4 cartoon was drawn in good faith and did not breach section 18C, and that indigenous people would ­testify they were not “offended, insulted, humiliated or intimidated” by it.

Their letter states they will rely on evidence from “sociologists and criminologists, as well as ­witnesses having direct daily ­exposure to the problems associated with juvenile crime and ­recidivism in remote Aboriginal communities, to establish that the point made by Leak’s cartoon is both a ‘genuine’ matter of concern and a legitimate issue of ‘public ­interest’’’.

Jodie Ball, the delegate for commission president Professor Triggs, advised the newspaper this month that an investigation under section 18C had been triggered by complainant Melissa Dinnison, who says she has ­“experienced ­racial hatred” and been discriminated against as a result of the ­cartoon.

In Leak’s and the newspaper’s reply yesterday to Professor Triggs, who has faced resignation calls this week after falsely claiming to a Senate committee that journalists at Melbourne’s The ­Saturday Paper fabricated her quotes, the commission is charged with “playing politics” with the welfare of children.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Jordan doesn’t want this cartoon shown because it mocks ISIS and Allah

What kind of a country objects to a cartoon on an anti-Islamic State facebook page mocking an evil terrorist group by poking fun at how they imagine they are close to Allah? I suggest it is  country that harbours extreme views and is sympathetic towards the group’s goal of creating an Islamic caliphate.

Jordan has arrested eminent cartoonist and political satirist Nahed Hattar for a cartoon which shows a conversation between a jihadist and Allah in paradise.They arrested him for the crime of insulting religion. I searched for his facebook page but Facebook appear to be yet again enforcing the Sharia on behalf of their Islamic overlords.

Cartoon-Shows-Allah-640-580

 

The cartoon is translated below by by Clarion Project Arabic Affairs Analyst Anwar el-Iraqi.

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If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

You can follow me on Gab.ai 

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Ta Moko cartoon: Whaleoil reader is offended [guest post]

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I’m seriously offended, and as offence can only be taken, not given, I decided to sit and think about it.

I’m offended over the reaction from the Ta Moko cartoons depicting a little Maori boy beaten with visible bruising. Not the cartoon itself, it’s quite factual, and I maintain if it was depicting a little Pakeha boy, or an Asian boy, or even a Jewish boy, it would be okay, or those communities would accept it and move on even though statistically, they are 4 times less to be the subject of family violence than a Maori, or 3 times less than a PI child.

Naida Glavish is a prominent Maori woman, and holds a lot of Mana within Maori, she COULD be an effective change agent, if she stood up and championed change instead of taking offence. Or, could she be offended mainly as she has been the subject of things in Whaleoil previously? My belief is she really needs to sit down and look at the real problem, that the main group of people or communities committing these violent offences are still in DENIAL, and instead of accepting there is an issue and doing something about it, she and many like her run out and decide to take a fence. Surround themselves with a shield, ignore, bury their heads and claim there is nothing wrong, and don’t you dare single out my community/culture, that’s racist. I wonder how many of the abused children, the ones who were killed, do they think its racist, was their abuse and murder racist?   

I’m also offended by the Human Rights (Wrongs) commission, they are simply adding fuel to the fire, instead of coming out with the truth the rest of NZers already know and understand, and what is a massive thorn in NZ’s side on the international stage, they often side with the offended, and give them another reason to ignore the stats, the violence and the abuse of children. By siding with the perpetually offended, they are enabling the very abuse and violence that is so deeply rooted in those communities and cultures.    

When you break it down, the role of the Human Rights Commission is to set and to keep standards for ALL Kiwis, all means ALL, not just the leaders or the offended from certain communities or cultures, so I ask the Human Rights Commission, who stood up for the following children’s human rights, and who will stand up for the other kids who are being violently abused, murdered, deprived, and so on, who will stand up for their human rights, as currently, their parents and caregivers and collective communities are not, they seem to have adopted a silence on domestic violence, and especially of violence against children: Read more »

“Drive them into the sea”

Joe Sacco

Joe Sacco, The Guadian

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

“I’ve had death threats because of cartoons I’ve done”

I’ve had death threats for a word I used.

The world is full of people scared of freedom, and it has to be shut down by force.  At the soft end, our own Labour and Green parties who are about banning, legislating and boycotts.

At the other end, ferals, criminals and terrorists.

web-dave-brown-paris-cartoon

Dave Brown, The Independent

 

Writes the cartoonist for The Independent

As a cartoonist, I often have to come up with a take on unpleasant events, but I don’t think I’ve ever been confronted with anything quite like the murders at Charlie Hebdo – people being killed for doing exactly the job that I do.

Generally I’m thinking, “How do I make something funny?”. But when something horrific like this happens, a belly laugh isn’t what you’re looking for. Tragic stories can be quite difficult. So you have to analyse what exactly your response is and what you want to say.

Drawing it was quite an emotional experience. If I had known any of the Charlie Hebdo team personally it would have been even harder. But what drives you as a cartoonist is being angry at events, and being angry with things you see as ridiculous, wrong-headed, venal, evil.

I hesitate to call satire a weapon, but it is definitely a thing these people detest. They don’t have a rational argument, and responding to something as immediate as visual satire is beyond them. It has a power which they can’t match, so their only answer is to close it down by whatever means. And that’s always been the case with fascists and extremists across the ages. Being mocked is too much for them to take. So we need to find a way carry on doing it and carry on laughing at them.

– Dave Brown

The freedoms we take for granted are under attack.

Constant attack.

And they come from the most unexpected places.  Through boycotts, blocks, censorship, legal action… anything but open and direct debate.

What we say has a truth to it that can not be argued with.  So it is to be deemed offensive.  This is the mechanism by which it has to be to shut down.  To protect people from ideas.

What happened in Paris and what happens in New Zealand are thankfully a universe apart.  But beware the people that seek to limit your freedoms.  These are the same people that get upset when the government wants to spy on criminals, but in the next breath will want to boycott, tax or ban your access to information or products that aren’t deemed to be good for you.

Freedom offends.

Truth offends.

 

– The Independent

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Tagged:

Andrew Little the cartoon

I do enjoy a good political cartoon and our resident cartoonist SonovaMin  is fantastic. Usually his cartoons provide us with a refreshingly alternative view of the Political world to that portrayed by other cartoonists out there but recently I have noticed a common theme.

On one topic they all seem to agree…

Chicane - Southland Times 19 November 2014

Chicane – Southland Times 19 November 2014

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Emmerson – NZ Herald 19 November 2014

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If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

You can follow me on Gab.ai 

To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Tremain’s got a good one

Credit:  Emerson / NZ Herald

Credit: Tremain / NZ Herald

Certainly looks like Hone is so beguiled by the money that he’s willing to put his closest supporters off-side.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Cartoon of the Day

The Chop’s Captain Dotcom – his tractor beam is always on (Episode 4!)  is out

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Captain Dotcom – his tractor beam is always on

Thanks to The Chop, an Onion-like web site (if they don’t mind me slapping a label on), we have permission to draw your attention to their Captain Dotcom cartoon strip.

Credit:  The Chop  -  http://www.thechop.co.nz/

Credit: The Chop – http://www.thechop.co.nz/

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Tagged:

Cartoon of the Day

trouser-polls

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.