class action lawsuit

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Government inquiries condemned the study as unethical and new policies were enacted. The U.S. paid $10 million in a class-action lawsuit to study participants and their descendants. PHOTO CREDIT: THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES

Government inquiries condemned the study as unethical and new policies were enacted. The U.S. paid $10 million in a class-action lawsuit to study participants and their descendants.
PHOTO CREDIT: THE NATIONAL ARCHIVES

The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment

Historically, African-Americans, Native Americans and other minorities have been excluded from clinical trials that seek to uncover risk factors for disease and offer life-saving new treatments. The infamous federally funded Tuskegee syphilis experiment—shut down in 1972—denied treatment to hundreds of African-American men suffering from the disease.

The Tuskegee Syphilis Experiment was conducted by government funded researchers from the Tuskegee Institute between 1932 and 1972 in Macon County, Alabama to examine the progression of syphilis in poor African-American men. When penicillin was discovered as an effective medication for the disease in 1947, researchers refused to administer it, choosing instead to continue the study. In 1972, journalist Jean Heller broke the story and an enraged public forced the researchers to put an end to the study. Government inquiries condemned the study as unethical and in 1973, a class-action lawsuit was filed on behalf of the study participants. In 1974, a $10 million settlement was reached, and all living participants were promised lifetime medical benefis by the U.S. government.

Early in the twentieth century, the medical community was practically helpless in its battle against syphilis. The crippling affliction was spreading at an alarming rate in certain areas, particularly among the poorer segments of the world population. Even for those who could afford medical care, the only known treatments rivaled the disease itself in the harm they did to sufferers.

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I have got good news and bad news – details within

Turns out, Red Bull does not give you wings.

“No s*** Sherlock”, I hear you say, “but what’s the bad news?”

If you drank red bull in the last 12 years, and you didn’t automatically grow wings, then you’ll be entitled to a small piece of a hefty settlement the company has agreed to pay for false advertising.

But thanks to all the press the cash payouts have received, the check maybe much smaller than originally anticipated.

Energy drink Red Bull GmbH settled two class-action lawsuits this week, agreeing to pay $13million because their famous slogan ‘Red Bull gives you wings’ isn’t true.

It was originally reported that anyone who bought a drink from January 1, 2002 to October 3, 2014 would be eligible to receive either a $10 cash payment of $15 in Red Bull product -regardless of whether there was a receipt for proof.

There’s now speculation that the cash payouts will be much less since an influx of people are making claims on the energy drink’s settlement website. According to the terms of the lawsuit, the company agreed to pay customers up to $13million, not $10 in cash to anyone who filed a claim by the deadline. It’s unclear whether the payouts will be diluted if more than $1.3million ask for cash payouts, or if the company will stop accepting claims after a quota has been reached.

I honestly don’t know if to laugh or cry at humanity’s stupidity, the legal system’s stupidity…   we could seriously be doomed as a species.   This is embarrassing for the human race!   Read more »