Common Sense

No matter how much I don’t want it to, Winston is making more sense

Lately I’ve been paying far more attention to what he and New Zealand First are saying. Sometimes I cringe, just like in the old days. But more often I find myself listening and nodding.

Not because I want to rush out and vote for him. You need to trust me when I say I make a point of not caring too deeply about ‘democracy’ in these dying days of that word.

I listen mainly because he seems to be making more and more sense of the world we are finding ourselves in than, say, the three major parties.

The mere fact that, and on a regular basis, he uses a Voldemort word ? neoliberalism ? where others never publicly do, tells me he is going to go far in 2017.

There’s a huge part of the electorate that wants that word, and everything it stands for shouted from the rooftops via a megaphone.

There’s also a huge part of the political establishment who simply won’t utter it. You know, not wanting to scare the horses and all that.

Except the establishment doesn’t seem to appreciate that the horses have already bolted, dragging their riders by the stirrups through a rattlesnake-infested landscape of money and cowboys. Read more »

Politically correct council hoist by their own petard

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In the good old days toilets and changing rooms were pretty simple. We lived in a world where it was acknowledged that there were only two genders, male and female. Nowadays however, the number of genders is constantly being updated and extended. What used to be incredibly simple, has now become incredibly complex. Where common sense once ruled, political correctness has taken its place. A person’s right to change in a room surrounded by people with the same biological body as themselves is now under attack. Nothing illustrates the insanity of political correctness quite like this story.

Photo Of The Day

Auschwitz 31. Women survivors huddled in a prisoner barracks shortly after Soviet forces liberated the Auschwitz camp. Auschwitz, Poland, 1945.

Auschwitz 31. Women survivors huddled in a prisoner barracks shortly after Soviet forces liberated the Auschwitz camp. Auschwitz, Poland, 1945.

How One Woman Delivered 3,000 Babies During The Holocaust

Auschwitz had all sorts of facilities, such as sleeping quarters, offices, kitchens and latrines. It also had a “sick ward” where, in atrocious conditions, sick prisoners were looked after by physicians who were prisoners themselves. Anyone who appeared unlikely to get well was killed. Thus the physicians were constantly concealing serious cases by falsifying records to permit a longer stay to those who otherwise would have been sent to the crematorium. Almost all survivors of Auschwitz suffered from typhoid, a disease that qualified inmates for liquidation, but was never reported thanks to the courage of the physicians. They were risking their lives since the punishment for breaking any rule in the concentration camp was death. Auschwitz also had a “maternity-ward.” Many of the women who arrived at the camp were pregnant. They were needed for work; their babies were not. One of the midwives working in the ward was Stanislawa Leszczynska.

When Stanislawa Leszczy?ska first became a midwife, she never could have imagined that she would one day be whisked away from her home in Poland, where she routinely walked miles to deliver babies, and into the real-life nightmare of Auschwitz. After the murder of her husband in Poland and the forced removal of her son to another work camp, Stanislawa and her daughter entered Auschwitz with only one hope: that they would survive.

Born Stanislawa Zambrzyska in 1896, she married Bronislaw Leszczynski in 1916 and together they had two sons and a daughter. In 1922, she graduated from a school for midwives and began working in the poorest districts of Lodz. In pre-war Poland, babies were normally delivered at home. Stanislawa made herself available at any time, walking many kilometers to the homes of the women she helped. Her children recall that she often worked nights but she never slept during the day.

After the war, she returned to her job in Lodz. Her husband had been killed in the Warsaw uprising of 1944, but all of her children survived and, inspired by their mother’s example, went on to become physicians. Stanislawa supported their education, earning the family livelihood through a devoted service to childbirth.

In March 1957, as her retirement neared, a reception was organized to commemorate her 35 years in the profession. Her son, Dr. Bronislaw Leszczynski, remarked to her before the reception that she might be asked about Auschwitz. Until that time, she had said nothing about her work in the concentration camp. Her son began taking notes and later, during the reception when all the speeches were over, he stood up and told his mother’s story.

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The day common sense died

Packet of nuts doesn’t contain a warning that it contains nuts. ?* sigh *

A supermarket chain has withdrawn bags of nuts – after failing to declare they may contain peanuts.

The Food Standards Agency issued an allergy alert saying the presence of peanuts was not declared on Booths’ own brand packets of monkey nuts.

The supermarket has removed 300 packets of 350g Whole Hearted Roasted Monkey Nuts from its shelves.

Booths has apologised and warned customers with a peanut allergy not to consume the product.

Booths technical manager Waheed Hassan said: “It is our responsibility as retailers to accurately record allergy advice.

“In this instance, we felt a responsibility to recall the product and issue a notice to our customers who might suffer from a specific peanut allergy.”

 

via Tumblr

via Tumblr

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Too much to hope for common sense?

via The Courier-Journal

via The Courier-Journal

He can’t believe it has happened again?

Has someone checked Novopay isn’t beset with the number 666?

 

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At last, some common sense

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