Commonwealth Bay

Turney claims too much ice, caused by warming, is killing penguins

Professor Chris Turney the expedition leader of the Ship of Fools just can’t stop digging.

He is now claiming that too much ice (caused by global warming) is forcing penguins to starve and die.

The article he links to claims this:

In normal years the Adelie penguins that nest at Cape Denison can feed in the open waters of Commonwealth Bay, but now they must walk over 60 km across the ice in order to find food. This giant iceberg has set up a natural experiment that tests the resilience of Adelie penguins to major iceberg calving and stranding events that we expect to become more common with climate change.

Hang on a minute…weren’t we told a few years back that lack of sea ice was killing penguinsRead more »

Mark Steyn on the Ship of Fools

Mark Steyn comments on the hapless Ship of Fools in his latest column.

Yes, yes, just to get the obligatory ‘of courses’ out of the way up front: of course ‘weather’ is not the same as ‘climate’; and of course the thickest iciest ice on record could well be evidence of ‘global warming’, just as 40-and-sunny and a 35-below blizzard and 12 degrees and partly cloudy with occasional showers are all apparently manifestations of ‘climate change’; and of course the global warm-mongers are entirely sincere in their belief that the massive carbon footprint of their rescue operation can be offset by the planting of wall-to-wall trees the length and breadth of Australia, Britain, America and continental Europe.

But still: you’d have to have a heart as cold and unmovable as Commonwealth Bay ice not to be howling with laughter at the exquisite symbolic perfection of the Australasian Antarctic Expedition ‘stuck in our own experiment’, as they put it. I confess I was hoping it might all drag on a bit longer and the cultists of the ecopalypse would find themselves drawing straws as to which of their number would be first on the roasting spit. On Douglas Mawson’s original voyage, he and his surviving comrade wound up having to eat their dogs. I’m not sure there were any on this expedition, so they’d probably have to make do with the Guardian reporters. Forced to wait a year to be rescued, Sir Douglas later recalled, ‘Several of my toes commenced to blacken and fester near the tips.’ Now there’s a man who’s serious about reducing his footprint.

But alas, eating one’s shipmates and watching one’s extremities drop off one by one is not a part of today’s high-end eco-doom tourism. Instead, the ice-locked warmists uploaded chipper selfies to YouTube, as well as a self-composed New Year singalong of such hearty un-self-awareness that it enraged even such party-line climate alarmists as Andrew Revkin, the plonkingly earnest enviro-blogger of the New York Times. A mere six weeks ago, pumping out the usual boosterism, the Australian Broadcasting Corporation reported that, had Captain Scott picked his team as carefully as Professor Chris Turney, he would have survived. Sadly, we’ll never know — although I’ll bet Captain Oates would have been doing his ‘I am going out. I may be some time’ line about eight bars into that New Year number.   Read more »

The trapped warmists is surely the funniest story of the year

The ongoing saga of the idiot warmists trapped in sea ice during summer as they attempt to follow in the footsteps of another Antarctic expedition from 1912.

There is a slight problem with their attempt. In 1912 Mawson actually managed to sail right into Commonwealth Bay with no ice to be seen.

The first boat to go ashore at Commonwealth Bay. © Mitchell Collection, State Library of NSW (Photo: Percy Gray)

The first boat to go ashore at Commonwealth Bay. © Mitchell Collection, State Library of NSW (Photo: Percy Gray)

There is even film footage available.

Compare that to today, where the expedition, trying to compare the impact of global warming (snigger) on the environment since Mawson’s time.

A second icebreaker has now given up reaching the forlorn scientists…ermmm…media…uhmm…activists…ahem..tourists trapped by sea ice.

The Aurora Australis has abandoned its first attempt to cut through the ice surrounding the stranded Akademik Shokalskiy after moving just two nautical miles.

Around 6am the Aurora’s captain Murray Doyle began to manoeuvre the icebreaker through thick wedges of consolidated sea ice.  Read more »