Consanguinity

This explains a lot

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Many people can’t fathom the crazies of Islam, and you’ve all heard the epithet “mad Mullahs”…but it seems that there may be sound reasoning as to why they seem unable to act like reasonable human beings.

Inbreeding…I’m not kidding. It seems cousin shagging is all the rage?amongst Islamic nations and peoples.

Nikolai Sennels is a Danish psychologist who has done extensive research into a little-known problem in the Muslim world: the disastrous results of Muslim inbreeding brought about by the marriage of first cousins.

This practice, which has been prohibited in the Judeo-Christian tradition since the days of Moses, was sanctioned by Muhammad and has been going on now for 1,400 years in the Muslim world. This practice of inbreeding will never go away, since Muhammad is the ultimate example and authority on all matters, including marriage.

The massive inbreeding in Muslim culture may well have done irreversible damage to the Muslim gene pool and extensive damage to its intelligence, sanity, and health.

According to Sennels, close to half of all Muslims in the world are inbred. In Pakistan, the number approaches 70%. Even in England, more than half of Pakistani immigrants are married to their first cousins, and in Denmark the number of inbred Pakistani immigrants is around 40%.

The numbers are equally devastating in other important Muslim countries: 67% in Saudi Arabia, 64% in Jordan and Kuwait, 63% in Sudan, 60% in Iraq, and 54% in the United Arab Emirates and Qatar. ? Read more »

A vote winner on the West Coast

? Stuff.co.nz

Gay people can’t get married, but in New Zealand first cousins can…but now a researcher says we should get over our squeamishness:

A Perth-based researcher has called for an end to the stigma surrounding marriage between cousins, after uncovering evidence that the health risks have been greatly exaggerated.

Murdoch University adjunct professor Alan Bittles has shed new light on the consequences of intra-familial marriages, which he says are on the rise in Australia due to increased migration.

Bittles has sought to address common misconceptions of same-blood marriage, from a social, medical and religious perspective, in a new book based on 35 years of research.

Bittles claims more than 1.1 billion people are either married to a close relative or are the offspring of such a marriage, which are common in many Muslim, Buddhist, Christian, Hindu and Jewish communities.

In his book, Consanguinity in Context, Bittles called for greater understanding and acceptance of the practice, which is largely taboo in Western countries.

Of course he probably didn’t check out this case in ?Pakistan where married cousins had a six legged baby?recently:

Pakistani doctors are battling the odds to save a newborn baby born with a rare genetic condition that has left him with six legs.

The one-week-old boy is believed to be one of parasitic twins.

His conjoined twin was born prematurely and incompletely developed, which resulted in the second child having the extra legs, said Jamal Raza, director of the National Institute of Child Health in Karachi, to?News.com.

Shaikh and his wife of four years live in Sukkur, around 280 miles north of where his son is being cared for. His wife is reported to be recovering well from the birth and in a good state of health.

His wife – who is also his cousin – has been unable to travel because she had a caesarean section delivery.

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