Cuba

Photo of the Day

According to author A.E. Hotchner, Ernest Hemingway considered his first wife Hadley — seen here — to be the love of his life. 03 September 1921 Horton’s Bay, Michigan
Wedding of Hadley Richardson and Ernest Hemingway. L-R: Carol Hemingway, Ursula Hemingway, Hadley Richardson Hemingway, Ernest Hemingway, Grace Hall Hemingway, Leicester Hemingway, Dr C. E. Hemingway. Photograph in the Ernest Hemingway Photograph Collection, John Fitzgerald Kennedy Library, Boston.

Ernest Hemingway

 Ernest Hemingway, American Nobel Prize-winning author, was one of the most celebrated and influential literary stylists of the twentieth century. His critical reputation rests solidly upon a small body of exceptional writing, set apart by its style, emotional content, and dramatic intensity of vision.

He was born into the hands of his physician father. He was the second of six children of Dr Clarence Hemingway and Grace Hemingway (the daughter of English immigrants). His father’s interests in history and literature, as well as his outdoorsy hobbies (fishing and hunting), became a lifestyle for Ernest. His mother was a domineering type who wanted a daughter, not a son, and dressed Ernest as a girl and called him Ernestine.

Hemingway’s early years were spent largely in fighting the feminine influence of his mother while feeding off the influence of his father. He spent the summers with his family in the woods of northern Michigan, where he often accompanied his father on professional calls.

His mother also had a habit of abusing his quiet father, who suffered from diabetes. The discovery of his father’s apparent lack of courage, later depicted in the short story “The Doctor and the Doctor’s Wife,” and his suicide several years later left the boy with an emotional scar.

Ernest later described the community in his hometown as one having “wide lawns and narrow minds.”

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Photo of the Day

Photo of Marita Lorenz and Fidel Castro.

Marita Lorenz

The CIA Agent Who Was Sent To Kill Castro But Slept With Him Instead

The U.S. government invented all sorts of harebrained schemes to kill Fidel Castro—and I mean really, truly off-the-wall plots. There was the time the CIA tried to poison his milkshake. There was the ploy to discredit him by spraying him down with LSD and watching him go insane during a live radio broadcast. There was, I kid you not, an idea to pack his omnipresent cigar with explosives. Then there was Marita Lorenz. Lorenz was once Castro’s lover before she turned against him on the basis, perhaps, of the role he played in the abortion of their child.

A 1993 Vanity Fair profile by Ann Louise Bardach does a deep dive into Lorenz’s convoluted history, doing its best to untangle the sticky web of lies that Lorenz herself seems to have been responsible for spinning. But one thing that’s certain is that Lorenz was sent by the CIA to poison Castro and that she bungled it completely.

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Shocking Human Rights abusers elected by the UN to 2017 Human Rights council

If the United Nations was a legitimate organisation then you would expect it to elect countries with the best Human Rights records to the 2017 Human Rights Council. You wouldn’t expect countries with systematic suppression of free speech, arbitrary detentions, death sentences for apostasy and extrajudicial killings to be elected. Shockingly the United Nations has selected countries with exactly those human rights abuses to serve on its 2017 Human Rights Council.

The Human Rights Council, mind you, is supposed to “uphold the highest standards in the promotion and protection of human rights,” according to its mandate…

Let’s take a closer look at the new members of the 2017 Human Rights Council.

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The world is a better place, one less communist – Fidel Castro croaks

Fidel Castro, Prime Minister of Cuba, smokes a cigar during his meeting with two U.S. senators, the first to visit Castro's Cuba, in Havana, Cuba, Sept. 29, 1974. (AP Photo)

Fidel Castro, Prime Minister of Cuba, smokes a cigar during his meeting with two U.S. senators, the first to visit Castro’s Cuba, in Havana, Cuba, Sept. 29, 1974. (AP Photo)

Fidel Castro has died aged 90.

He can now go meet his mate, the terrorist Che Guevara, in hell.

Fidel Castro, the father of communist Cuba who led the country for nearly half a century, died Friday at the age of 90, Cuban state TV announced.

The revolutionary and former president retreated from the public eye in 2006 following emergency surgery for intestinal bleeding. His health problems forced him to temporarily hand power to his younger brother, defense minister Raul Castro, who permanently took his place as president in 2008.

Castro’s death follows a historic thawing of relations between Cuba and the United States with the announcement in mid-December that the countries planned to restore diplomatic and economic ties.

Six weeks after that announcement, Castro made his first comments about the deal, writing that he backs the negotiations even though he distrusts American politics.   Read more »

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What do the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada and Ireland do more of than New Zealand?

Watch more porn than we do.

New Zealanders’ porn-watching habits have been revealed — and it turns out Kiwis spend a lot more time indulging than the worldwide average.

On a per capita basis Kiwis are the fifth most regular visitors to website PornHub, behind the United States, the United Kingdom, Canada and Ireland and ahead of Norway, Iceland, Australia, Sweden and Denmark.

But Kiwis are not ones to let porn mess with their rugby- watching habits — the website reports the number of viewers from New Zealand dropping 47 per cent during the 2015 Rugby World Cup final.

Interestingly, more women appreciate porn in the land of the long white cloud than in most other countries, with 35 per cent of Kiwi visitors to PornHub being female, according to the site.

Kiwis spend an average of nine minutes and 37 seconds on PornHub, 21 seconds longer than the worldwide average length.

In Gisborne, that time increases by 27 seconds, with viewers putting aside more than 10 minutes on average each time they visit the site.

Is it a surprise that Gisborne also heads up the national STI rates? They do.  Read more »

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Photo Of The Day

Patricia Schmidt was born in Toledeo, OH. After graduating from high school, in 1943, she moved to Chicago and began dancing under the name La Satira where she met John Lester Mee. In April 1947 she pulled a .22 caliber handgun and shot him in the neck.

Patricia Schmidt was born in Toledeo, OH. After graduating from high school, in 1943, she moved to Chicago and began dancing under the name La Satira where she met John Lester Mee. In April 1947 she pulled a .22 caliber handgun and shot him in the neck.

Monkeyshine

The life, loves and death of one John Lester Mee the spiciest mixture of sin, sex, masochism and monkeyshine [mischievous or playful activity] justice. It was the type of news the U.S. press tells only too well, and loves to tell.

Cuban justice had seemed as indignant over Patricia (“La Satira”) Schmidt’s violation of Latin good manners as it was over the fact that she killed her lover, John Lester Mee, with a .22 pistol. In sentencing Cootch-Dancer Schmidt to 15 years for manslaughter the judges had chided her for “appearing nude on the deck of Mee’s yacht like a nymph,” and for “swimming naked in Havana Bay.”

Said Toledo-born La Satira… “They just don’t understand our customs.”

It all began one night in a Chika-boom-Chicka-boom boom room, as so many good stories do.

The joint was Miller’s Silver Palm Tavern, on the nice-and-naughty Wilson Ave. burlesque strip in Uptown Chicago.

It was summertime 1946.

Patricia Schmidt, a lissome brunette two years out of Toledo’s Devilbiss High School, was onstage, fluttering through her Balinese-style dance act. Jack Mee, a few months out of the Navy, gazed up at her and felt a hammer in his heart.

It was lust at first leer.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo: Alberto Diaz Gutierrez

Photo: Alberto Diaz Gutierrez

The Photographer behind the Face of

Ernesto Che Guevara

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This is why you don’t release terrorists

More than 100 terrorists formerly held at Guantanamo Bay and released by the Obama administration are back out in the wild committing acts of terror.

At least 116 terrorists released from the U.S. prison based in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba, have returned to terrorism, according to a new report from the Director of National Intelligence released last week.

“Based on trends identified during the past eleven years, we assess that some detainees currently at GTMO will seek to reengage in terrorist or insurgent activities after they are transferred,” the report said.

Thirty three suspected terrorists were released from the prison — or as the Obama administration calls it, “transferred” — in 2014. During his first presidential campaign, Barack Obama pledged to close the prison, saying it prompts Islamic extremists into attacking U.S. interests.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo by Joe McNally/Time & Life Pic

Photo by Joe McNally/Time & Life Pic

Kim’s Story

Phan Thi Kim Phuc, who was famously photographed by Nick Ut as a naked 9 year old running from a napalm attack during the Vietnam War, holding her son and showing her horribly scarred back. Kim Phuc was the girl on the photograph that brought the world’s attention to the horrors of the war in Vietnam.

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Face of the day

Churchill patting Rommel, a cocker spaniel owned by General Sir Bernard Montgomery (Monty) in Normandy in August 1944.

Churchill patting Rommel, a cocker spaniel owned by General Sir Bernard Montgomery (Monty) in Normandy in August 1944.

Yesterday was the anniversary of Winston Churchill’s death. He is a historical figure that I admire because he symbolises to me the determination and tenacity of the underdog. Britain was not winning the war when he became Prime Minister and he had to deal with defeat and failure but he never gave up. His speeches are still quoted today because of the way he used the spoken word to inspire and to energise the British people. One line from one of his speeches is as relevant today for the UK as it was back in 1940.

You ask, what is our aim? I can answer in one word: It is victory, victory at all costs, victory in spite of all terror, victory, however long and hard the road may be; for without victory, there is no survival.

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