cyberbullying

Are Media breaking the law?

We have in New Zealand a new anti-online bullying law. I don’t support it because it is poorly written and can easily be used as an anti-blasphemy law to prevent people from legitimately?criticising?religion.

I do wonder though if the MSM are breaking it when they use criminally obtained online personal information and use it to expose, humiliate and harm individuals.

? New cyberbullying law will create a criminal offence of intentionally causing harm by posting a digital communication, punishable by up to two years’ imprisonment or a maximum fine of $50,000.

-A newspaper

Read more »

Michelle Boag is a bitter old bag and wrong as usual

Boag

Michelle Boag went on Radio Live with Sean Plunket and Mike Williams and made all sorts of allegations about me and my good mate Carrick Graham.

She really went to town on it and then threatened to take me to court using the cyber-bullying laws if I slagged the old bag off. She of course forgets that her comments?went out via streaming and have now been broadcast, also via Facebook. If she wants to go down that path then let’s have at it.

She has said she knows someone who has paid me not to say anything on my blog about them. That is a lie…because there is not a single person who has ever paid me to keep their name out of the blog…but she needs to come clean with the name of this person so I can invoice them for these services she claims I am providing. Read more »

Well done Amy, you cocked that up didn’t you?

I did warn the politicians, but?Goddammit. ?What have we gotten ourselves into now?

New Zealand has imposed some of the world’s strictest blasphemy laws by stealth, a Humanist group says.

The new Harmful Digital Communications Act, intended to stop cyber-bullying, could have the effect of landing a person in jail for two years for committing blasphemy, the New Zealand Humanist Society said this week.

This aspect of the new law was an affront to four in ten Kiwis who weren’t adherents of any religion, the group said.

“This legislation not only flies in the face of human rights, but the introduction of yet another law that gives special privileges to religions is unfair, unpopular and unrepresentative of our society, where over 40 per cent of New Zealanders identify as not religious, making this our country’s largest single belief group,” said Mark Honeychurch, the Society’s president.

The Act stated digital communications “should not denigrate an individual by reason of his or her colour, race, ethnic or national origins, religion, gender, sexual orientation, or disability.”

Mr Honeychurch said the law would effectively impose some of the world’s strictest penalties – including fines of up to $50,000 – on people found guilty of blaspheming, or insulting religion. ?? Read more »

Boing Boing and the EFF label the HDC as troll-friendly

Boing Boing and the EFF don’t have much good to say about Amy Adams’ Harmful Digital Communications Act.

If you set out to create the platonic ideal of a badly considered anti-trolling bill that made a bunch of ineffectual gestures at ending harassment without regard to the collateral damage on everything else on the Internet, well, you?d be New Zealand?s Parliament, apparently.

The Harmful Digital Communications Act has been under consideration for three years, but despite a long debate, the Parliament elected to create restrictions on all online speech ? from private arguments to videos of police brutality ? that would never be countenanced in the offline world.

HDC?s takedown regime takes all the worst elements of DMCA takedowns ? someone complains to a hosting company or ISP and they remove material nearly automatically, with hardly any consideration of whether the complaint passes the giggle-test ? and makes them even worse. Under the new system, trolls who mass-dox or denial-of-service attack a victim could make all of her online presence disappear with impunity, and face no penalties at all for abusing the procedure. If the victim did manage to attempt a counterclaim to keep her online life intact, it would require that she disclose her home address and other details to her attackers.

Read more »

Labour wants a law that’s flawed, but will fix it once it is in place?

Labour are starting to realise the poison chalice that the Harmful Digital Communications Bill represents.

They are backing away slowly, but in doing so they appear to actually want a flawed Bill and are promising to fix it later.

That would be a fine thing if only they could credibly claim that they have a chance at being the next government.

The Harmful Digital Communications Bill is likely to pass its third reading today, the final step before it is signed into law. It will create a new offence of sending messages or posting material online that were intended to cause harm, and did so.

Another new offence will be incitement to commit suicide in situations where the person does not then attempt to take their own life. Internet service providers or companies such as Facebook or Google could be asked by a New Zealand agency to remove a harmful communication.

Labour has reluctantly supported the bill, but wants a review once it is in place. Communications spokeswoman Clare Curran said in debate that the definition of harm – serious emotional distress – was very broad.

“That is going to have to be tested in the courts to see what it actually means … How long is it going to take before there is a 14 or 15-year-old hauled before the courts?” ?? Read more »

Using an anti-bullying law to bully someone lawfully

A Bill to curb the growing incidence of cyberbullying and its devastating effects passed its second reading in Parliament last night.

The Harmful Digital Communications Bill introduces a range of measures to address damaging online communications and ensure perpetrators are held to account for their actions.

Justice Minister Amy Adams says the Bill will prevent and reduce the harm caused by cyberbullying and harassment.

?Harmful digital communications include emails, texts and social media posts that people use to intimidate others, spread damaging or degrading rumours and publish invasive and distressing photographs,? says Ms Adams.

?This Bill has the potential to stop cyberbullies and reduce the devastating impact their actions can have. Importantly, our proposals also empower victims, by providing a quick, low-cost and effective way to right the wrongs done to them.

Ms Adams said recent events, such as the Roast Busters case, highlighted the need for legislation to help prevent victims from being re-traumatised on the internet and hold perpetrators to account. Read more »

×