CYFS

Kids like Moko will continue to die. Tolley says Government can’t help them

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Ms Tolley, who was at the pre-Budget announcement for sexual violence services, said those responsible for Moko’s death had already accepted responsibility.

“We have a court process where two people put their hands up to torturing a three-year-old which resulted in his death. That’s the truth.  Those people are the two people responsible for Moko’s death.

“It’s an absolute tragedy and your heart goes out to all the family. It would be the worst nightmare for a family to lose a child in that way,” she said. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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Would you call CYF on a hunch?

That’s the question posed by Stacey Kirk

We must all act to help our abused children – because getting outraged afterwards can’t save Moko. That’s why we are calling for a ministerial inquiry to discover how we can do better to protect our most innocent.

It was not just the two people who beat, tortured and eventually killed three-year-old Moko Rangitoheriri who knew the little boy was at risk. There were others.

Tania Shailer and David Haerewa committed unimaginably sadistic violence against a toddler. Some of the others who failed him are good people.

This small boy’s seven-year-old sister cried for help, when she told a Womens’ Refuge social worker.

The little girl who felt so responsible for the plight of her brother spoke up, despite one of their carers (now killer) Tania Shailer – a friend of the children’s mother – telling her she’d kill her parents if she said anything.

The other one of Moko’s killers, Shailer’s partner, David Haerewa, is related to notorious child-killer Ben Haerewa, who was jailed in 1999 for killing his four-year-old stepson James Whakaruru in the Hawke’s Bay.

This public culture of not intervening is beyond disgraceful, so here’s the list of people and organisations that we know knew something – there are likely more:  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Accidental government data leak – Cue Media Party fueled outrage

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The Ministry of Social Development has admitted to accidentally sending a list of 43 children in Child, Youth and Family care, to a member of the public.

A Waikato grandmother, who doesn’t want to be named, found the two-page list with documents sent to her family by CYF earlier this week.

“They have all these children’s names and their caregiver’s names in them, and how much they’re getting paid and why they’re getting paid,” she says.

The document is a board payment batch summary report, detailing the care allowance provided to the families looking after the children, for things like birthday money, pocket money, board and nappies. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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Do you feel personally ashamed for NZ’s child murder rate?

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A Stuff special investigation has collated the details of nearly all children, under 14 years of age, that were killed as a result of neglect, abuse, or maltreatment in New Zealand since 1992.

…The panel overseeing the CYF business case is made up of civil servants and experts, both domestically and internationally, who will not waste any time picking apart the numerous flaws in the department’s system.

It’s expected that the kinds of changes proposed will require millions of dollars, likely needing to be stumped up over multiple budgets.

We need to spend this money. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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Goverment expected to pay up for unwanted children

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Deirdre Mussen explains

Three children were enough for a mother who went into hospital to have her tubes tied in 1997. But she is now a mother of five, and says the botched sterilisation has had “huge financial implications”.

“They’re good kids, but if I had stopped at number three, I would be kicking up my heels now. Instead, I’ve still got child commitments.”

The woman is one of at least 11 pursuing ACC for the cost of raising children as a result of failed sterilisations. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

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Judith Collins sends key Owen Glenn report recommendation packing

As we saw yesterday, the reason we have Maori violence towards women and children is because they were told by early colonisers that men were more important than women and children.  In short, it’s not their fault for beating women and killing babies because their sense of what is right and wrong was destroyed by these early British New Zealanders.

Since Owen Glenn paid $3 million dollars for a report that returned gems like the above, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that the other major recommendation, to overturn the way the Family Court works, is getting a similarly cold response.  Isaac Davison reports

Justice Minister Judith Collins has ruled out reversing the burden of proof in domestic violence cases – one of the key recommendations in the first report of the Glenn Inquiry.

Mrs Collins said this morning she would not consider the proposal, which would replace the adversarial court system with one which would place the burden of proof on alleged perpetrators instead of victims.

“The last thing I want to do is have our whole domestic violence work called into question by anybody saying it was impossible to prove that someone hasn’t actually assaulted someone.”

She also defended the Family Court after the Glenn Inquiry heard it was dysfunctional. Mrs Collins said recent reforms were a step in the right direction.

The reforms were implemented in March, and placed more emphasis on families resolving their conflict outside of court. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Taite Kupa convicted on 21 charges of sexually and physically abusing children

Who is Taite Kupa, apart from the sort of lowlife that needs the full extent of the law applied?

Would you believe that he’s someone CYFS placed children with?

Simon Day reports

He would kick and pinch the children, and would withhold food from children who misbehaved, making them eat grass sandwiches or serving plates of stones.

Jane*, the mother of a young boy and girl who were assaulted while in Kupa’s care, has spoken of her despair at seeing her children put into an abusive home. The children were originally taken from her, at the ages of 5 and 1, because her partner was beating her.

In January 2013 the children were allowed to visit their mother for the first time since 2010 for the unveiling of their grandfather’s headstone. It was then that the children told Jane of the physical abuse in the house. She went straight to the police.

I can assure you right now that not a single person will be held accountable in CYFS for this.  This is the most serious breach of duty and care, and someone, somewhere is probably still in a position of making decisions over other people’s lives.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Poster child for state sterilisation?

What’s the point of allowing someone the “human right” of child birth, but then not the right to look after it?

The state has seized the newborn baby of one of New Zealand’s most notorious convicted child abusers – the second time in two years it has removed a newborn from her care.

One right-wing lobby group says Oriwa Kemp, jailed for cruelty to Rotorua toddler Nia Glassie, should be offered money to be sterilised, but a former Women’s Refuge head says she has a right to have children and Government agencies have failed her.

Kemp says handing over her daughter just a couple of hours after she was born in North Shore Hospital last week was traumatic and she was being discriminated against because of her past.

Kemp was 18 when she was sentenced to three years and four months imprisonment for cruelty to Nia, 3, who died in 2007.

She gave Nia cold baths, hit her when she cried and was present when the toddler was swung on a clothes line and placed in a clothes dryer.

It is an interesting point of view.  Taking the baby away before harm has come to it.  Surely that is against her human rights?

Why are we so touchy about violating her human rights by not sterilising her, but we’re ok to steal a baby from her before any harm has come to it.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

BREAKING: Internet censorship of 9 year old drunk [UPDATED]

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Of course, trying to censor the Internet doesn’t work.  The video is up all over the place in various incarnations. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

The Kiwi that put the 8 yr old drunk on YouTube: Hero or Villain [POLL]

Jenna Lynch and Jonathan Carson have the story of the day today.  They interviewed Bradley Goudie, the 18 year old who recorded the 8 year old boy off his face and made him famous world-wide.  (if you  missed it:  the video is here)

The man who filmed a drunk young boy at a skate park says he would not have released the video if police had acted hard and fast, and communicated that to him.

Bradley Goudie, 18, uploaded a video online which showed a nine-year-old boy at Fairfield Skate Park in Clarkin Rd [Hamilton] on Tuesday afternoon with a can of Cody’s Bourbon and Cola – 7 per cent alcohol.

The boy, who struggles to stand and slurs his speech, says “I’ve been drunk before”. He also says he was given alcohol by his aunt.

Goudie, a professional scooter rider, said he was so shocked by the apparent drunkenness of the boy that he turned his camera on him and exposed what he considered one of the biggest issues in New Zealand – underage drinking.

When he had stopped filming, he immediately rang the police.

I think I would have called an ambulance too.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.