Damien O’Connor

The sensible wing of the Labour party say ‘no thanks’ to Green deal

The wheels are already falling off the Labour/Green civil union.

The sensible wing of the Labour has voiced their opinion with Damien O’Connor saying he can’t endorse the deal.

Labour’s West Coast-Tasman MP Damien O’Connor won’t say whether he supports the new agreement between Labour and the Greens.

The two parties signed a memorandum of understanding yesterday. They’ve agreed to work together to change the Government, to co-operate in Parliament and to investigate a joint policy and/or campaign.

Mr O’Connor would not answer “yes” or “no” today when asked – seven times – whether he supported the memorandum. ?? Read more »

What a good idea Damien, let’s try it on the Labour caucus

The Labour Party is showing just how out of touch with reality it is by calling on Fonterra’s Theo Spierings to take a pay cut, ostensibly because of performance, but also as Damien O’Connor claims?”to restore credibility with farmers and staff”.

The Labour Party has launched into the controversy surrounding Fonterra’s latest restructuring by saying chief executive Theo Spierings should take a voluntary pay cut “to restore credibility with farmers and staff”.

Spierings’ salary has been estimated to be worth about $4 million a year.

“The events of the last week have shaken the farming sector’s confidence in Fonterra, and the chief executive must take responsibility,” Labour’s Primary Industries spokesperson Damien O’Connor said in a statement.

“Theo Spierings should lead by example and voluntarily reduce his pay by half,” he said.

Read more »

If they’re not staring at goats they are staring at sheep

Labour are spastic, Andrew Little especially.

He is going in to bat, now, for 50,000 non-voting sheep.

I kid you not.

Labour wants assurances that tens of thousands of sheep and cattle being shipped to Mexico won’t be killed when they get there.

The shipment leaves Timaru today.

Leader Andrew Little told Newstalk ZB’s Rachel Smalley the regulations are clear – you can export live sheep for breeding purposes, you can’t for slaughter.

He admits 50,000 seems like a big number for breeding stock.

“We really need to know and be assured very firmly that these sheep are not going to wind up in a slaughter house somewhere in Mexico that they genuinely are for breeding stock.” ?? Read more »

Labour’s attempt to sabotage Key’s security speech (#FAIL)

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Two minutes before John Key started his speech, this was “BREAKING NEWS”

Solid Energy is poised to walk away from the Pike River mine re-entry, the MP for West Coast Tasman claims.

This morning Labour’s Damien O’Connor said he believed Solid Energy was about to “walk away from all responsibility” for the mine. Read more »

The Labour Party really have no clue…

The Labour Leadership race made it to Nelson last night.

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That’s the crowd.

Read more »

Duncan Garner on Labour MPs running for the life rafts

I covered this earlier today, Duncan is on it too

Three Labour MPs have broken ranks in recent weeks ? quite loudly and very publicly.

They are interested in one thing: self-preservation. They want to win their seats and they?ve given up relying on their party. They are clearly concerned Labour will poll poorly on election night, so they?ve decided to run their own campaigns ? away from head office and away from the leader.

These MPs have either chosen not to be on the list or they have a low-list spot. They are vulnerable. It?s all or nothing for them.

They must win their seats to return to Parliament; this sort of pressure usually focuses an MP?s mind.

They want to be back in Parliament and they want the $150k salary.

I?m talking about West Coast-Tasman MP, Damien O?Connor, Hutt South MP, Trevor Mallard and list MP and Te Tai Tokerau candidate, Kelvin Davis.

Take Davis: yesterday he engaged Labour in its biggest u-turn in years. He told me he supported the Puhoi-Wellsford road project that his party has openly mocked and criticised.

Labour MPs call it the holiday highway; David Cunliffe has campaigned against it. Labour, until yesterday, was going to can the project upon taking office. Who knows where they stand now!

Davis told me people in the north tell him they want the controversial project and so does he.

Jobs, transport, industry, tourism. ? Yeah, controversial indeed. ?If only Labour supported ‘radical’ ideas like that.

Read more »

Problem solved, cancel his permanent residency

I’m not sure that either the NZ Herald or Laila Harre are being particularly helpful with David Fisher’s latest shock, horror, Dotcom piece today.

Note the Herald got an oh so convenient privacy waiver from Kim Dotcom. I’ll bet he wouldn’t give a privacy waiver to any other media organisation other than John Campbell.

Apparently there was ‘pressure’ to let him in.

The SIS tried to block Kim Dotcom’s residency application but dropped their objection 90 minutes after being told there was “political pressure” to let the tycoon into New Zealand, secret documents from the spy agency reveal.

Last night the leader of the Dotcom-funded Internet Party, Laila Harre, said she “wouldn’t have been comfortable” granting the tycoon residency if she had been the Minister of Immigration.

Documents declassified and released through the Official Information Act show the Security Intelligence Service describing Dotcom as a “bad but wealthy man” who was under criminal investigation by the FBI.

I’m not sure the game they are playing here…are they saying he should never have been let in?

I agree, but this problem can be easily fixed. Review and then cancel his permanent residency…then we don’t need to worry about extraditing him, he will have to leave anyway.

Problem solved.? Read more »

More from the Herald on The Cunliffe

The Herald has continued their series on “The Cunliffe”.

While last weeks effort would have made The Cunliffe happy I doubt he will be pleased with todays works, especially those by Claire Trevett.

He is fingered as a snitch:

Cunliffe describes that 1999 intake as the first political generation that had not been “scarred” by Rogernomics or the acrimony after it. But that first term also saw the start of the problem Cunliffe has struggled with since – his relations with his caucus colleagues.

Cunliffe and Tamihere gravitated towards each other, part of a group of junior MPs including Clayton Cosgrove and Damien O’Connor, and dubbed themselves the “Mods” – short for Modernisers. They met in each other’s offices for drinks and discussed policies and the direction Labour might take in the longer term, post-Clark. They decided to recruit others and Tamihere says Cunliffe returned with loyal Clarkists. Whether it was innocent or deliberate, he was seen to have dobbed them in.

Cunliffe denies it: “I certainly didn’t go telling tales on class mates. JT and I were in the middle of that group, not everybody agreed with everybody else and in the end it didn’t go that far. But I’d reject that I dobbed anyone in.”

Whatever happened, Cunliffe’s friendship with most in that grouping waned after that point. One onlooker at the time recalls Cunliffe as trying to be friends with everyone. “It was like high school kind of stuff. He’d walk in [to Parliament’s cafe] and go ‘g’day bro’ how you going?’ and JT would just look at him like one of the nerdy kids had come up to him in the playground.”

Tamihere says there was no big blow out and they did maintain a professional relationship. Asked about the Mods’ goals now, Tamihere laughs and says “well, you always go down there with those heady ideals.”
“He’s an extraordinarily talented chap but you never get to see the real David. You get to see the David that he thinks you want to see. And that’s his problem.

What Trevett didn’t mention, but my Labour source did, was that after ratting out the Mods to Clark H2 (Heather Simpson) summonsed each of them individually and gave them a dressing down. They were rinsed and it is something that Clayton Cosgrove has never forgotten and why he is the ex-officio leader of the ABCs.? Read more »

Labour’s positive message didn’t even last a day

Labour promised a positive campaign:

David Cunliffe’s put his MPs on notice – no sledging of the opposition.

Labour’s leader’s to stay away from slinging personal dirt and run a positive campaign, targeting issues and policies.

David Cunliffe admits it won’t be easy for some veteran combatants like Trevor Mallard.

“It’s always a bit tempting in the parliamentary bear pit to respond and we will need to show some restraint and probably won’t be perfect.

David Cunliffe says the New Zealand public is frustrated by the theatrics during question time in Parliament and this is an attempt to improve the political tone.

That didn’t last long, less than a day.? Read more »

Face of the day

Damien O'Connor Meme

Damien O’Connor Meme

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