David Rankin

Ngapuhi stoush over taonga

Ngapuhi are at loggerheads again, this time over some taonga loaned to a museum, with one elder – David Rankin – saying they are now being treated with disrespect.

A museum at Waitangi that opened to the public today has already been hit with a demand for the return of objects including Hone Heke’s tomahawk.

The Museum of Waitangi, part of a $14 million redevelopment of the Treaty Grounds, was formally opened by the Governor-General, Sir Jerry Mateparae, on Friday, and opened to the public today.

But Ngapuhi leader David Rankin has this evening contacted management to demand the return of two taonga he said his hapu, Te Matarahurahu, agreed to lend to the museum.

Mr Rankin told the Herald he had never been given any documentation after handing over the two precious items — a tomahawk that belonged to his ancestor Hone Heke and a godstick used by the tohunga Papahurihia — in July.

He said the final straw came when neither he nor any of his hapu’s kaumatua were invited to the museum opening, and the artefacts had been treated “like items at a garage sale”.   Read more »

Ngapuhi threat of TPPA Waitangi Marae ban nothing more than hot air

David Rankin

Threats by self-appointed Waitangi Marae caretaker and cleaner Kingi Taurua to ban politicians from the marae on Waitangi Day are empty and a case of Mr Taurua “crying wolf” says Ngapuhi kaumatua David Rankin.

“Mr Taurua has a long history of hating. This time, he has turned his attention to the TPPA, and without understanding the benefits it will bring to our people, is trying to organise a ban of politicians at the Te Tii Marae at Waitangi,” says Mr Rankin. Read more »

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Speaking out against dodgy Auckland Council and their Maori pandering

David Rankin speaks out against the council’s mana whenua sites policies:

Aucklander and Ngapuhi cultural expert, David Rankin, who will be standing for the Auckland Council in 2016 election, has lashed out at the latest Council moves affecting ‘sites of cultural value’ in the city.

Mr Rankin says that the Council’s recent decision to remove 1373 locations from the list of supposedly culturally significant sites shows that the process has been what he describes as “a farce from the outset”.

Mr Rankin, who relocated the bones of his ancestor, Hone Heke, says that the process of claiming these “sites of value” reflected a snatch and grab mentality, and was culturally ignorant.

“Traditionally, tapu [sacred] sites were made tapu only for a specific reason, such as being the site of a battle.  Afterwards, they were made noa [ordinary] so everyone could return to using the site as required.”There is a brief karakia and ritual involved in returning a region to its noa status, says Mr Rankin, and he intends to perform this ceremony sometime next year.  As he explains.

“Once the tapu has been lifted, these sites will no longer have any sacred significance, and can be used as any other land in the city.”

It was essentially brownmail…and Stephen Franks points that out in a  recent blog post, although he doesn’t use my rather crude term.

We have advised a public spirited group called Democracy Action on the unlawfulness of Auckland Council’s ‘Mana Whenua’ provisions.

We have lately been investigating the prospects for a class action against the Council. In our opinion there are strong grounds for liability, but so far there may not have been enough evidence of realised loss to justify the costs of action. Today’s Herald reports that the Council will shortly vote on a proposal to remove 1,373 of the 3,600 ‘sites of value’:

That removal could delay the time when it would be economic to launch a class action.    Read more »

David Rankin to stand for Auckland Council, promises to disband Maori Statutory Authority

insult

David Rankin calls things how he sees them and he doesn’t see much that he likes about Auckland Council.

He has announced that he is standing for the Council and has some policies that could get some good traction.

Ngapuhi leader and outspoken public commentator David Rankin has announced his intention to stand for the Auckland Council in next year’s local body elections.

“This Council is broken – it lacks imagination and integrity, and is driven by Len Brown’s vanity projects, which will drive Auckland bankrupt” says Rankin.

Rankin will be basing his campaign on a simple five-point plan.  The five policies are:

  1. Put an immediate end to the inner-city rail loop, and invest the funds instead on roading.    Read more »

Finlayson tells King of Huntly to naff off

Chris Finlayson has told the former truck driver and King of Huntly to naff off over his ridiculous idea that Tainui can claim Auckland under the Treaty of Waitangi.

Treaty Negotiations Minister Chris Finlayson has one message for Waikato-Tainui if it wants to begin negotiating a claim over parts of Auckland – get a mandate and specify your claims.

He said he had given Tukoroirangi Morgan the same message about five times in the past.

“He nods and then nothing happens,” Mr Finlayson told the Herald.

“Mandates don’t last forever.”    Read more »

Maori “King of Huntly” told to naff off by Ngapuhi, they reckon Auckland is “theirs”

Ngapuhi…who, I might point out, controlled Auckland by conquest, have told Tainui to bugger off.

Ngapuhi leader David Rankin said Friday’s announcement that Maori King Tuheitia will lay claim to Auckland, is a “bit cheeky”.

He told more than 500 people gathered at Turangawaewae Marae in Ngaruawahia, including Prime Minister John Key, he was determined to see the claim through.

“It must be done,” Tuheitia said on Friday. “I am determined to do it with the start of the Kingitanga claim in Tamaki.”

The claim extends north to Mahurangi, down the Firth of Thames and across to the Manukau Harbour and to Piha.    Read more »

Iwi leaders’ water claim “nothing but corporate greed” says Ngapuhi academic

David Rankin has called out the Iwi Leadership Group for their attempt to hijack water in New Zealand, aided and abetted by Bill English and Nick Smith.

His press release makes perfect sense.

As iwi leaders from around the country meet to discuss claiming commercial rights to all the country’s lakes, rivers, reservoirs, dams and any other fresh water, Ngapuhi academic David Rankin has questioned their motives.

Mr Rankin, who is currently undertaking a PhD on traditional property rights, points out that prior to the arrival of Europeans in New Zealand, Maori never owned water.  And even after Europeans arrived, Maori never owned water.  He says that there is no cultural basis or historical precedent for the claim.  Neither is water Treaty right according to him “Water is not mentioned in the Treaty once.  ‘Taonga’ are mentioned, but these are not property rights.  A ‘taonga’ traditionally was something that could be acquired at the point of a spear.  Try doing that with water”, he says.   Read more »

Face of the day

David Rankin

David Rankin

David Rankin is an interesting person to do a google search on.

He has talked about the possibility of Maori not being indigenous in 2012

The status of Maori as the country’s indigenous population could be in danger if research, which suggests previous civilisations lived in New Zealand before Maori arrived, is proved true.

Ngapuhi leader David Rankin said books by authors such as investigative journalist Ian Wishart and historian Noel Hilliam presented “clear evidence” that some of New Zealand’s earliest residents might have arrived before the Polynesians.

He pointed to numerous Maori oral histories which referred to people being here when the first Maori arrived, including fair-skinned people.

“If we believe our histories, then we as Maori are not the indigenous people of New Zealand.”

The archaeological evidence in some research was a potential challenge to the status of Maori as indigenous, which was why he believed no other Maori was prepared to speak publicly on the issue, Mr Rankin said.

Details of much of the country’s past was being concealed by academic historians, he said.

“I would say it’s a conspiracy. They are worried that their own research will be exposed so they have worked hard to ridicule and suppress any Maori history which disagrees with their views.

“However, the tide is turning and more people are now seeing that there is a whole history of our country that has been concealed and which will have major implications for Treaty settlements for example.”

-NZHerald

Read more »

Rankin calls for Burqa ban at Waitangi

burqa_ban

Outspoken Ngaphui leader David Rankin had called for a ban of the burqa at Waitangi.

Presumably not just for Waitangi Day but all times.

With the 175th anniversary of the Treaty of Waitangi approaching, the Ngapuhi leader David Rankin has called for a ban on burqas being worn at Waitangi, citing cultural reasons:

“Islam condemns cultures that do not comply with its rules.  We therefore see Islam as a direct threat to our rangatiratanga (sovereignty) and our culture,” he says.   Read more »

David Rankin on the Waitangi Tribunal decision

Today the Waitangi tribunal tried to rewrite law by issuing their decision that that Maori chiefs who signed the Treaty of Waitangi did not cede sovereignty.

Shortly thereafter David Rankin of Ngapuhi issued a press release:

Iwi leader says Tribunal ignored testimony and defames his ancestor

The Ngapuhi leader David Rankin (a descendent of the nineteenth century warrior chief Hone Heke) says that the Waitangi Tribunal report on Maori sovereignty, which is released today, defames his famous ancestor.

Mr Rankin gave evidence at a Waitangi Tribunal hearing which led to this report.  His testimony included details of the oral history of the treaty signing and how the rangatira [chiefs] at the time regarded political developments that were occurring:

“When our tupuna, Hone Heke, signed the Treaty of Waitangi, he did so because he know it was the only option in terms of having a relationship with the British Crown.  But the tribunal is now telling us that all those chiefs saw the Declaration of Independence, which a few had signed in 1835, as being the basis of their relationship with the British.  That is a lie and that is not what the tribunal was told.

Mr Rankin says the Tribunal report defames the memory of Hone Heke, and of his whanau’s oral histories, and that if the tribunal refuses to alter the report to reflect the testimony he provided at the hearing, he will lodge a Treaty claim against the tribunal itself, which will be a first in Treaty history, for prejudicial effect.

On top of that Paul Moon, a notable historian has also come out saying much the same thing.  Read more »