Denver

Where is Colorado’s predicted crime wave from legalisation?

Colorado legalised the sale of cannabis and the opponents predicted a massive crime wave as a result.

German Lopez at Vox explains reality vs scaremongering.

When Colorado legalized recreational marijuana sales, Denver embraced the opportunity with open arms.

The city is now home to more than 62 percent of all Colorado recreational marijuana retailers, who cashed in on?$14 million in sales?in January alone.

Other cities weren’t so eager: heeding legalization opponents’ safety concerns, several pushed off licensing retail sales. Some banned retail sales altogether.

“There will be many harmful consequences,” Douglas County Sheriff David Weaver warned in a September 2012 statement.?”Expect more crime, more kids using marijuana, and pot for sale everywhere.”

One California sheriff?went on Denver television?to warn that, as a result of marijuana in his county, “thugs put on masks, they come to your house, they kick in your door. They point guns at you and say, ‘Give me your marijuana, give me your money.'”

Three months into its legalization experiment, Denver isn’t seeing a widespread rise in crime. Violent and property crimes actually decreased slightly, and some cities are taking a second look at allowing marijuana sales. ? Read more »

Never mess with the NRA

Politicians keep on trying to unreasonably control guns in breach of the Second Amendment and the NRA keep on hammering them. The NRA are strong and successful advocates for their members, they never back down.

You’d think the politicians would learn. Turns out they are slow learners…perhaps even retarded.

A populist backlash against Colorado?s new gun-control laws claimed its third political casualty on Wednesday as a Democratic state senator resigned her seat rather than face a recall vote that could have cost her party control of the chamber.

For Democrats in this swing state, the resignation of the senator, Evie Hudak, was a sign of the growing political cost of?their votes last winterto expand background checks and limit the size of ammunition magazines ? measures once hailed as breakthrough victories in the effort to respond to mass shootings.

Polls show that voters embrace aspects of the new laws. But the measures have infuriated gun advocates and Republicans, and have become political liabilities in a state where the gun debate is shaped by traditions of hunting and sport-shooting, as well as by the shadows of mass shootings at?Columbine High School?and the Century 16 movie theater in Aurora. ? Read more »

The truth about Fukushima

There was much scaremongering in the wake of the tsunami and the shut-down of the Fukushima reactors. Most of it media driven and most of it drivel.

Have read of what Richard Muller has to say about it all at the Wall Street Journal:

Denver has particularly high natural radioactivity. It comes primarily from radioactive radon gas, emitted from tiny concentrations of uranium found in local granite. If you live there, you get, on average, an extra dose of .3 rem of radiation per year (on top of the .62 rem that the average American absorbs annually from various sources). A rem is the unit of measure used to gauge radiation damage to human tissue.

The International Commission on Radiological Protection recommends evacuation of a locality whenever the excess radiation dose exceeds .1 rem per year. But that’s one-third of what I call the “Denver dose.” Applied strictly, the ICRP standard would seem to require the immediate evacuation of Denver.

It is worth noting that, despite its high radiation levels, Denver generally has a lower cancer rate than the rest of the United States. Some scientists interpret this as evidence that low levels of radiation induce cancer resistance; I think it is more likely that lifestyle differences account for the disparity.

Now consider the most famous victim of the March 2011 tsunami in Japan: the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. Two workers at the reactor were killed by the tsunami, which is believed to have been 50 feet high at the site.

But over the following weeks and months, the fear grew that the ultimate victims of this damaged nuke would number in the thousands or tens of thousands. The “hot spots” in Japan that frightened many people showed radiation at the level of .1 rem, a number quite small compared with the average excess dose that people happily live with in Denver.

Right so Denver, Colorado is more radioactive than the area surrounding a major nuclear accident.

If you are exposed to a dose of 100 rem or more, you will get sick right away from radiation illness. You know what that’s like from people who have had radiation therapy: nausea, loss of hair, a general feeling of weakness. In the Fukushima accident, nobody got a dose this big; workers were restricted in their hours of exposure to try to make sure that none received a dose greater than 25 rem (although some exceeded this level). At a larger dose?250 to 350 rem?the symptoms become life-threatening. Essential enzymes are damaged, and your chance of dying (if untreated) is 50%.

The hotspots were just .1 rem…and no one even got close to a life threatening dosage. To put this in perspective let’s look at some numbers. Estimates of likely death caused by the reactor failures vary from Richard Muller’s 100 deaths all the way up to 1,500 deaths estimated by Richard?Garwin, a renowned nuclear expert. The tsunami killed 15,000 people.

The media has a great deal to anser for in panikcing people.