Dyson Heydon

Daryl Kerrigan has some advice for the ALP

Daryl Kerrigan needs to be telling the ALP a few home truths over their denials that the corruption inquiry has not damaged Bill Shorten.

Labor MPs are privately acknowledging the Opposition Leader has “lost some bark” during his appearance at the royal commission into union corruption, but they maintain the damage is not serious.

Bill Shorten has spent two days giving evidence at the commission hearing in Sydney, about his time as the Victorian and national secretary of the Australian Workers Union (AWU) before he entered politics.

He may also be recalled to give further evidence before the commission’s final report is due at the end of the year.

During the inquiry, Mr Shorten admitted that the Labor Party failed to declare a business donation of a senior staff member to his 2007 parliamentary election campaign.

The party only made the disclosure this week, eight years on.

It was just resting in the account…channelling Father Ted.

He has also been accused of a potential conflict of interest, because the union accepted $500,000 in payments from a glassworks company for ‘fees’ and ‘training’ while negotiating pay deals for workers.

The commissioner, Dyson Heydon QC, further criticised Mr Shorten for providing “long and extraneous” answers, and over his credibility as a witness.

Government frontbencher Eric Abetz said he thinks most people would be “horrified” by some of the evidence exposed through the royal commission.

But Mr Shorten has strongly rejected the accusation he has acted improperly.

At the end of the marathon hearings he fronted reporters to defend his reputation and declare he had “no conflict of interest whatsoever”.

“There was no evidence demonstrated of any conflict,” Mr Shorten said.

“The truth of the matter is that every day I was a union rep I was standing up for our members.”

Sources within the Labor Party have told the ABC that Mr Shorten has “lost some bark” through the process, and that it is “unhelpful” for the alternative prime minister to be hauled before the inquiry and the cameras.

But they do not think the damage to his credibility is serious and maintain there was “no smoking gun” or “hanging offence” in the commission hearing.

They’re dreamin’.

 

– ABC

Unions whining in Aussie as Royal Commission get underway

Finally they have a government in Australia who has the courage to take on the unions rorting the system, and slowly push them a little closer to extinction.

If only the John Key government would push for the same thing here, just grab a copy of their terms of reference, adapt it for NZ, and get the show under way.

After all, the honest unions have nothing to worry about.   So, no problem is there?

A ROYAL commission into trade union governance, slush funds and corruption is nothing more than a witch-hunt and taxpayers will be better served if more money went to enforcing existing laws, unions say.

The royal commission into trade union governance started in Sydney on Wednesday, with commissioner Dyson Heydon saying the inquiry’s both broad and restrictive terms of reference will probe the facts behind a range of union practices.

Justice Heydon says the commission does not want to see unions abolished or curbed into insignificance.  Read more »

Union corruption so out of hand Abbott convenes a Royal Commission

As the months drag by and more and more revelations of union corruption surface in investigations by the Independent Commissions Against Corruption pressure has been building to have a more fuller Federal inquiry.

Tony Abbott has now convened a Royal Commission to look at union corruption.

Five of the nation’s most powerful unions linked to the ALP have been named as targets of a wide-ranging royal commission on union corruption – in which former prime minister Julia Gillard and other MPs and union officials are expected to give evidence.

The announcement came as Fairfax Media learnt Opposition Leader Bill Shorten had referred to police a secret dossier compiled by a whistleblower that made explosive corruption allegations that centre on the Construction, Forestry, Mining and Energy Union.

Other unions are also set to be dragged in and the government says construction firms accused of paying kickbacks to union officials to curry peace or win contracts will also be in the gun.

The CFMEU is one of the five unions named in the terms of reference, along with the Electrical Trades Union, the Transport Workers Union, the Australian Workers’ Union, and the Health Services Union.    Read more »