e-cigarette

Health nazis in UK stopping people adopting if they use e-cigs

So let’s get this straight…you can have your own kids, use drugs, smoke cigarettes and be bombed on booze and there is no problem.

But in the UK if you use an e-cigarette, with no harmful vapours at all and you are completely unsuitable for adopting children.

Social workers have barred a couple from adopting a child after the would-be father was seen smoking an e-cigarette.

The decision came after the pair had passed a long series of tests to qualify as parents, and had earlier paid for expensive fertility treatment, which failed.

They were told they could not adopt if either of them had used an e-cigarette in the past 12 months – despite experts saying that ‘vaping’ poses little or no threat to children in the home.

Last night, the couple said: ‘When there are so many children desperate for a family and a stable home, to put up such trivial barriers is ridiculous.’

The decision by Staffordshire County Council is unlikely to be a one-off.

At least 13 councils in England ban e-cigarette users from fostering or adopting young children, The Mail on Sunday has found – and there could be more.

‘Abigail’ and ‘Brian’, who do not want to give their real names, approached the council in December 2013 after several failed IVF attempts costing over £20,000.

A social worker visited the following month, but made ‘no mention’ of restrictions on smokers or e-cigarette users adopting, they claim. At the time, Brian was a light smoker of normal cigarettes.

By last September, having undergone medicals and interviews, and having proved they were of sound character and financially capable of raising a child, the pair thought they were on track to adopt. But when a social worker saw Brian using an e-cigarette, everything changed.

Brian, 45, said: ‘By then I’d stopped smoking completely and hadn’t had a real cigarette in months. I was using e-cigarettes as a cessation aid, to ease the nicotine cravings.’

The social worker warned them the council did not allow smokers to adopt young children, although she was unclear about its position with e-cigarette users.

The next day, she revealed that the council would not place a child with anyone who had used e-cigarettes in the previous 12 months either.

In October, she confirmed in an email: ‘Should you both become non smokers/e-smokers over a 12-month period, then you could of course reapply.’

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

One health campaigner gets it on e-cigs

Most of the state funded troughers in the anti-smoking lobby are vehemently opposed to e-cigarettes…which almost everyone agrees are a healthier alternative to smoking tobacco.

One such health researcher however stands apart from the crowd of troughers opposing and wanting to ban everything.

Ordering nicotine-based e-cigarette products off the shelves is “ridiculous”, says a health official and respected anti-smoking campaigner.

Despite being illegal according to the Ministry of Health’s rules, e-cigarettes containing nicotine have been widely available over the counter in Auckland.

But in the past few weeks, the ministry has dispatched smoke-free enforcement officers to inform retailers such sales are prohibited.

The devices, which contain flavoured “e-liquid” with or without nicotine, emit a smoke-like vapour.

One of the major e-cigarette retailers, Shosha, said on Thursday it would get rid of its stock either this week or next week.

Public health specialist Dr Murray Laugesen, who has been researching e-cigarettes since 2007, labelled the ministry’s decision “ridiculous” and said it would drive people back to smoking tobacco. He said e-cigarettes were less harmful than traditional cigarettes, a view shared by the World Health Organisation.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

The Health wowsers want to ban them but e-cigarettes could save lives

The Health wowsers want to ban e-cigarettes.

Their reasoning is as wonky as the reasoning behind forcing plain packaging on people…in fact it could well be more wonky.

Encouraging cigarette smokers to switch to electronic versions could be a public health ‘revolution’ and save tens of thousands of lives a year in Britain, a coalition of experts has said.

The World Health Organisation is wrong to call for restrictions on e-cigarettes and instead should be promoting them as a way to quit smoking, it was argued.

A group of leading experts in tobacco controlled have critiqued a report by the WHO on e-cigarettes and said it contained errors and misrepresentations of the evidence.

It has been calculated that for every one million smokers who switch from cigarettes to electronic ones, which deliver nicotine but do not contain tobacco, then 6,000 premature deaths would be prevented every year.

It could mean more than 50,000 lives a year could be saved in England if every smoker switched.

The health wowsers would rather people died than remove most of the poisons from their habit by moving to e-cigarettes. They simply want to ban, ban, ban.

It never enters their mind that people might like to choose.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Australian Politician Tells it How it is

Bureaucrats are the same the world over. They think they know best, and as they’re the ones advising Government Ministers, they think they have the authority over what’s right and what’s wrong.

Public health troughers are the same, particularly as they try and get the government to introduce plain packaging for tobacco and lobby the government for fat and sugar taxes over soft drinks.

Occasionally a politician peers through the wool that is being pulled over their eyes by their officials and by troughers sucking on the taxpayers’ tit.

Last week David Leyonhjelm, Australian Liberal Democrat senator for NSW did exactly that, and on an issue that is sure to get the health zealots all fired up, by writing a piece in the Australian Financial Review titled “E-cigarettes at mercy of bureaucrats who ban by default”.

The honesty is refreshing and is an example politicians in NZ should look to for inspiration, instead of being captured by the health bureaucrats.

He talks about how the health bureaucrats have got the whole debate on e-cigs wrong in Australia, David Leyonhjelm had some cracker lines:

It seems everything is illegal in Australia unless a bureaucrat gives permission. What’s worse, you have to go to the trouble and expense of asking for permission, because if bureaucrats were proactive they would run the risk of serving the public.

A good example is the case of e-cigarettes. These inhalers deliver a warm puff of nicotine, without the carcinogenic tar and industrial solvents of cigarette smoke. Alternatively, they can deliver a puff of anything else you could wish for, such as the flavour of chocolate or whisky.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Not anti-smoking, anti-big tobacco

In an article about e-cigarettes you can see that the troughers and health busy-bodies involved in anti-smoking initiatives aren’t at all interested in health benefits, they are instead focussed on the big tobacco companies.

In New Zealand, scientists, doctors and public health workers are split on e-cigarettes. One half say we should steer clear of the latest addictive offering, lookalike cigarettes that keep smokers on a nicotine leash still held by Big Tobacco.

The other half say what the hell: if it helps people quit, why not go with it?  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.