Edward Snowden

Boom! Take that traitor

Excuse me while I just ROTFLMAO:

Russia is considering sending Edward Snowden back to the United States as a ‘gift’ to President Donald Trump, according to a US Intelligence report.

Trump has called the whistleblower a ‘spy’ and a ‘traitor’ who deserves to be executed.

A Snowden handover is an attempt for Russia President Vladimir Putin to ‘curry favor’ with Trump, a senior US official with knowledge of sensitive Russian intelligence information told NBC News on Friday.

Snowden’s ACLU lawyer, Ben Wizner, said he was unaware of any plan to extradite his client.

‘Team Snowden has received no such signals and has no new reason for concern’, Wizner said.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Tagged:

Norway’s Nobel Peace Centre is championing a Russian spy

A Whaleoil reader in Norway reports that you can beg President Obama for Snowden to be released, and the Nobel Peace Centre will even pay for the postage.

indhex

Here’s the front of the same card:  Read more »

Kremlin: Snowden a Russian agent

In the three years since Edward Snowden landed in Moscow, his relationship with his hosts has been a source of much speculation and controversy. The American IT contractor, who worked for the CIA and NSA until he fled Hawaii with more than a million purloined secret files, has not left Russia since he arrived at Sheremetyevo airport on 23 June 2013, on a flight from Hong Kong.

Snowden landed in Moscow with the permission of the Russian government, whose representatives he met during his sojourn in Hong Kong that lasted more than three weeks. He became so friendly with them that he actually celebrated his 30th birthday at the Russian consulate!

On the run from prosecution in the USA, Snowden received asylum from Vladimir Putin. Although Snowden recently indicated he would like a pardon from President Barack Obama before he leaves office in January, there’s no indication that will happen. The White House only a month ago explained that it considers Snowden to be a criminal, so any pardon seems like a fantasy.

Then there is the messy question of Snowden’s ties with the Kremlin. To anybody acquainted with the world of espionage, particularly when it involves Russians, Snowden is a defector and his collaboration with Moscow’s security agencies is a sure thing – as I explained recently.

Experts on the Kremlin’s powerful intelligence apparatus, what Russians call the “special services,” have no doubt that collaboration is a matter of simple quid pro quo. Any Western intelligence official who receives sanctuary in Russia will share what he knows with his hosts: there is no choice in the matter.

Snowden and his representatives have insisted that he is no collaborator. The official story is that Snowden arrived in Moscow with none of the classified documents he stole from NSA, and he refused to share secrets with Russian intelligence. According to Wikileaks, which told Snowden to flee to Moscow, the defector was approached by Russian spies after his arrival in their country, but refused to spill secrets.

Since Wikileaks itself is now more or less openly a front for the Kremlin, with its head Julian Assange mouthing pro-Putin propaganda with increasing frequency, there’s no reason to take its claims about Snowden seriously – particularly given Assange’s admitted role in getting the American to Moscow in the first place.

Nobody I know in Western intelligence circles believes any of these claims of Snowden’s innocence. If he has not collaborated with Russia’s special services, he would be the very first defector since 1917 not to do so. There are no indications that Vladimir Putin, who publicly called Snowden a “strange guy” and is not known for giving anything away for free, is that charitable. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Key’s smart politics forcing Little into a corner over spy agency report

Tracy Watkins discusses the forth-coming spy agency report that is due out.

When John Key and Andrew Little eyeball each other across the table during a closed door session of Parliament’s intelligence and security committee this week, the prime minister will be ready to turn the tables on his opponents.

Key is asking Labour to back him on legislation overhauling the country’s spy agencies, the Government Communications Security Bureau and Security Intelligence Service.

It might have sounded like Key was making the plea for bipartisanship from a position of weakness. Spies and the surveillance agencies have been Key’s Achilles heel after all. But the Labour leader will probably see Key’s plea for unity for what it is, a game of political brinkmanship. Because refusing to back any law changes lets Key paint Labour into a corner as weak on national security. Given Little’s previous call to back the Government on extending the powers of the SIS to detect Isis supporters, he seems unlikely to fall into that trap.

A lot has changed since the 2014 election campaign, when Key was wrong footed by allegations swirling around a bungling GCSB. Back then, Labour under David Cunliffe abandoned the usual bipartisanship on national security issues to rub the Government’s nose in those failures by opposing law changes governing the agency. Key was besieged on every front – even NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden joined the party.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

This will curdle your milk: Snowden tipped for Nobel Peace Prize

Former US spy agency contractor Edward Snowden, peace negotiators in Colombia and Greek islanders helping Syrian refugees are among those favoured for the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize, with the deadline for nominations looming.

Nobel watchers on Monday also speculated that negotiators of an accord over Iran’s nuclear program could be in the running after a surprise award last year to a coalition of Tunisian democracy campaigners, the National Dialogue Quartet.

“2016 may finally be Edward Snowden’s year … His leaks are now having a positive effect,” Kristian Berg Harpviken, head of the Peace Research Institute, Oslo, told Reuters on Monday (local time), putting him top of his list of candidates. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Ex-CIA Director on Snowden: I would prefer to see him hanged by the neck until he was dead rather than merely electrocuted

I’m with this guy.

A former CIA director says leaker Edward Snowden should be convicted of treason and given the death penalty in the wake of the terrorist attack on Paris.

“It’s still a capital crime, and I would give him the death sentence, and I would prefer to see him hanged by the neck until he’s dead, rather than merely electrocuted,” James Woolsey told CNN’s Brooke Baldwin on Thursday.

Woolsey said Snowden, who divulged classified in 2013, is partly responsible for the terrorist attack in France last week that left at least 120 dead and hundreds injured.

“I think the blood of a lot of these French young people is on his hands,” he said.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Former CIA boss blames Paris on the traitor Edward Snowden

Politico Magazine reports:

Michael Morell, the former acting head of the CIA, says the Paris attacks have exposed how freely the Islamic State was able to operate in a chastened environment in which intelligence gathering was partly shut down after Edward Snowden’s exposure of National Security Agency surveillance in 2013. Now, Morell says, the need for greater security is on everyone’s mind—especially since the terrorist group has threatened an attack on the U.S. In his recently published book, The Great War of Our Time: The CIA’s Fight Against Terrorism From Al Qa’ida to ISIS, Morell accuses Snowden of aiding in the rise of the Islamic State. In an interview on Tuesday with Politico Magazine National Editor Michael Hirsh, Morell elaborates on the damage he believes the leaker has done.

Michael Hirsh: How did the Snowden revelations help the Islamic State, and did they somehow lead to the Paris attacks?

Michael Morell: First, ISIS went to school on how we were collecting intelligence on terrorist organizations by using telecommunications technologies. And when they learned that from the Snowden disclosures, they were able to adapt to it and essentially go silent … And so, part of their rise was understanding what our capabilities were, adjusting to them so we couldn’t see them. No doubt in my mind. And the people who say otherwise are just trying to defend Edward Snowden.

Two—and much more damaging: The Snowden disclosures created this perception that people’s privacy was being put at significant risk. It wasn’t only the Snowden disclosures about [Section] 215 [of the PATRIOT Act, allowing for the mass collection of telephone metadata] that created that, it was the media’s handling of it. The media went to the darkest corner of the room, the CNNs and the FOXes etc. of the world, those people who have a 24/7 news cycle. In those early days, if you were watching CNN, they were saying the NSA is listening to your phone calls. It’s reading your emails. When you call your grandma in Arkansas, the NSA knows. All total bulls–t. They made the public more concerned about the privacy issue than the legitimate facts should have done. And so, the result of that was everything you’ve seen. The constraining of 215. The IT companies building encryption without keys. That is all, at the end of the day, back in Snowden’s lap, in my view.

As far as Paris goes, we don’t know for sure yet how these guys communicate among themselves and how they communicated back to the ISIS leadership in Iraq and Syria, but I’m fairly confident we’re going to learn they used these encrypted communication applications that have commercial encryption and are extremely difficult for companies to break—and which the companies have made the decision not to produce a key for. Even if the government goes to them with a warrant, they can’t give them anything because they don’t have a key. These companies made these decisions about encryption when they were finding it very difficult to sell their products overseas because the Snowden disclosures created the impression that the U.S. government was inside this hardware and software produced by them. They needed to do something to deal with the perception.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Does Edward Snowden have blood on his hands?

Personally I think the gutless little traitor does have blood on his hands. His stolen documents and his work alongside Julian Assange have actually killed people.

Worse their actions set back the West and their capabilities for several years while the Russians, Chinese and Islamic enemies carried on regardless.

New Zealand’s spy agencies are encountering an increasing amount of “dark communications” that they can’t monitor, Prime Minister John Key says.

The weekend killings in Paris have raised questions around interception capabilities and Mr Key says Islamic State has become better at knowing what forms of communication can and can’t be monitored.

“The amount of ‘dark communications’ that can’t be monitored by our agencies is increasing,” he told reporters in Vietnam, where he is leading a trade mission.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Scumbag protestors shut down first bit of openness and transparency from the GCSB

Far left protesters have been wanting more openness from spy agencies  and when the head of the GCSB is invited by the Privacy Commissioner to give a speech about what it the GCSB actually does, you know, in the interests of transparency, protestors then move to shut down that transparency by shouting down the speaker.

The acting head of the Government Communications Security Bureau (GCSB) says it is disappointing her planned speech this afternoon was hijacked by protesters as she was going to reveal operational details never previously discussed.

Una Jagose was about to deliver an address to a Privacy Commission technology forum at the National Library in Wellington when two anti-GCSB protesters unfurled a banner in front of the podium and refused to move.

One man from the audience appealed to the two women to allow Ms Jagose to speak, as that was what they were there to hear, but the protesters said they intended to remain for the duration of the speech.

Privacy Commissioner John Edwards then decided to cancel the event.

Afterwards Ms Jagose said the agency had heeded public calls for greater transparency.

“Protests are a legitimate part of the democracy that we live in and I like the democracy that we live in – so is the work that the bureau does, a legitimate part of the democracy we live in,” she said.

“So it was a shame that one stopped the other from going ahead today.”

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

UN intern faked his predicament, admits it to lefty website

All the media were a flutter about David Hyde, the poor fool who accepted an unpaid internship in Geneva working for the UN and then whinged like a hooker who hasn’t been paid when he couldn’t find accommodation.

Turns out the publicity was a scam, a little stunt by this fool in order to garner sympathy and score some free accommodation for him and his equally bludgy girlfriend.

With attitudes like that they just have to be lefties…the fact he wanted to work for the UN suggests that, but so too is his choice of outlet to fess up…the enablers of Julian Assange and the traitor Edward Snowden.

A young unpaid Kiwi intern at the United Nations who caused an uproar after he was reportedly living in a tent has admitted to arranging a publicity stunt.

David Hyde, 22, was offered somewhere to stay after Swiss newspaper Tribune de Geneve photographed him in his suit in front of the tent he was camping in on the shores of Lake Geneva.

Today Mr Hyde told The Intercept website he and his girlfriend had planned ahead to alert media to his living arrangement.

“I looked up some studios and room shares to see the sorts of prices I would be paying in Geneva and it was clear that it would be too expensive for me,” Mr Hyde told The Intercept.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.