Electric vehicles

We find the source of de Nile

Oops, don’t they know incandescent bulbs are bad for the planet?
Cover graphic for Te Mauri Hiko – Energy Futures

Last November, our History doctor, the Minister for Energy and Resources, Dr Megan Woods, announced in Question Time that all we needed was 4.5 windfarms per year. Quote.

That equates to a very achievable target of around the equivalent of 4.5 wind farms per year. End quote.

Hansard


Whaleoil, and the commenters, have had a lot of fun in the intervening months discussing the 4.5 windfarms per year mantra. We have noted that the size of the windfarms was not revealed and that none are consented and none are under construction and the ones we already have are wearing out and there are all manner of issues with this projection. If you wish to catch up here is a sample:

Earlier this year, a politician was prompted to send the source document to Whaleoil, for which we are duly grateful.

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Mike unplugs the hype

In a typically hard-hitting opinion piece, Mike Hosking tells us what we already know. If electric vehicles, as we currently know them, are the answer then it was a stupid question. Quote.

The never-ending drive of lobby groups to get the Government on board to solve life’s problems is, I note, already up and running for the new year.

There is a lobby group called “Drive Electric” that wants the Government more on board with incentives to get people on board with EVs. End quote.

The government has just given away $11 million of your money to this scam, but that’s for another post. Quote.

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Seriously?

Just when you thought that the electric vehicle hype nonsense could not get any sillier, there comes this press release from the City of Westminster in London. Quote.

FreeWire Technologies, a pioneer in flexible electric vehicle (EV) charging technology, has received funding from the Office for Low Emission Vehicles and Innovate UK to participate in the Wireless Electric Vehicle Charging for Commercial Users competition. Supported by international energy and services company Centrica plc and delivered in partnership with Westminster City Council, the project will combine FreeWire’s mobile EV charging technology with Zipcar UK’s electrified fleet and driver patterns to test the feasibility of scalable on-demand EV charging deployments.

The aim of the competition is to develop business cases that will encourage the adoption of electrified transportation in the UK through widespread charging options.
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Car charging cord for sale: Still in wrapper, never used

Will governments ever work out that people will be people and that the law of unintended consequences has a way of popping up just to frustrate them?  This from the BBC. Quote.

Tens of thousands of plug-in hybrids (PHEVs) bought with generous government grants may be burning as much fuel as combustion-engine cars.

​Data compiled for the BBC suggests that such vehicles in corporate fleets averaged just 40 miles per gallon (mpg), when they could have done 130.

Many drivers may never have unwrapped their charging cables, The Miles Consultancy said.
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The tax implications of electric vehicles

In the previous post we looked at the potential loss of tax revenue which will happen once 50% of the petrol vehicle fleet is electric. The government projections are for this to happen by 2040. (/Tui)

To replace this lost revenue there are three general methods: the salami principle, the cross-subsidy method, and the direct taxation method. Each of these mitigation measures can be appropriately applied at various stages of electric vehicle market penetration.

When the market penetration of electric vehicles is only 1%, then, indubitably, the easiest way to recover the lost revenue is to simply increase the existing petrol tax. A 0.8 cent increase in tax will doubtless be absorbed almost without comment from the struggling, battered motorist.

“‘Tis but a scratch.”

One can be sure that this increase will not be sold on the basis that, “We need to do this so that you petrol guzzlers can subsidise your neighbour’s electric car.” There will be some other weasel reason. Read more »

What your electric vehicle costs me

In order to encourage uptake of electric vehicles, owners enjoy privileges not enjoyed by ordinary motorists; reduced licence fees; exemption from mooted congestion charges; use of bus lanes and priority lanes etc.

And driving in a cloud of smug.

As the number of electric vehicles increases, these concessions will become unsustainable, and the smug will fade.  What this post considers is the effect on the government’s revenue of foregone petrol taxation. A second post will look at ways and means to recover this lost revenue. Read more »

Handing over control

Do you want Mercury Energy, Contact Energy or Trustpower etc to decide on your next car purchase?

Do you want Google deciding the appropriate time to adjust your thermostat?

All this could be coming to an electrical socket near you shortly according to this article from PEI. Quote. Read more »

Trump pulls the plug on electric vehicles

CarAdvice

CFACT reports: Quote.

Driven by Green ideology, the Obama Administration set unrealistic fuel standards for cars sold in America.

Yesterday, the Trump Administration announced it is putting a freeze on their implementation before any serious damage is done.
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The stupidity of electric cars to save the planet

I loathe electric cars. The mere sight of them makes me want to own a Hummer.

Most people who own them are virtue signalling wankers who drive around in a cloud of smug thinking they are saving the planet.

I do know two people who have electric cars. One owns one so he can bypass traffic on the motorway by travelling in the bus and transit lanes. The other owns one because he can, and he is a tech junkie with a pile of money.

That aside, the rest are mostly tossers, and their cloud of smug is noxious. On top of that, they are deluded in thinking they are making a difference.

One is the expense of switching to an all-electric light vehicle fleet.

Professor Kelly says he expects it will take 10 years for electric cars to make up 5% of the total light vehicle fleet. He estimates converting all cars would cost some $120 billion, not counting the infrastructure of charging stations.   Read more »

Simon Bridges gets schooled in manners

Selection_001

Typical behaviour from a young third-term buffoon:

Transport Minister Simon Bridges ignored official advice to consult with councils before announcing he would allow electric cars to use bus lanes.

He now faces a backlash with one council indicating it won’t implement the policy and another considering whether to enforce it.

Documents from the Ministry show he was told it would be “important to discuss” the measure before making any form of announcement on the Government’s high-profile, multimillion-dollar bid to get more New Zealanders into electric cars. Read more »