Exercise

Photo of the Day

26 Feb 1938 --- John Harvey Kellogg Age 86 --- Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

26 Feb 1938, John Harvey Kellogg Age 86. Image by © Bettmann/CORBIS

Dr Kellogg‘s Prescription

If Cereal Won’t Cool the Libido, Try Surgery – Kellogg, and the Crusade for Moral Fibre

For people the world over, a bowl of corn flakes is the go-to breakfast of choice.

But for the majority of those who look forward to their morning bowl, it will come as a surprise that they were invented to stop people masturbating.

John Harvey Kellogg, who first created the cereal in the late 19th century, originally intended it to be a ‘healthy, ready-to-eat anti-masturbatory morning meal’. Mr Kellogg, a physician, was uncomfortable about sex, believing it was unhealthy for the body, mind and soul.

He was celibate, having never consummated his marriage and keeping a separate bedroom from his wife.

Cornflakes were designed as a bland food that would not “over stimulate” the senses, and thus reduce the risk that the consumer would engage in “self-stimulation,” Corn Flakes were just a small part of the bizarre health regime designed by Kellogg and implemented in his Battle Creek, Michigan Sanitarium.

As a rule, there’s usually more to hapless folk wisdom than bad science, and so it is with myths about masturbation and other aspects of sexuality. In America, a peculiar flowering of such myths took place in the 19th century. Though the predictable culprits — Victorian prudery, evangelical Christianity, entrepreneurialism — are part of the picture, the lesser-known reality is their century-old relationship with whole-grain foodstuffs. That is, thanks to certain influential health advocates back then, sex and diet were inexorably linked and for both, healthy meant bland.

Read more »

Lance Wiggs has it almost right

Yesterday the Green party announced that they think it would be a good idea to spend $50 million over four years to encourage kids to walk or ride bikes to school.

What was amazing was that they called for submission and then closed them and delivered a policy in 3 days. that is surely just the thinnest veneer of public consultation on policy. On the plus at least they aren’t stealing images from Peter Jackson anymore.

It is something I have been banging on about for years, but as is usual the Greens think money has to be spent.

Lance Wiggs agrees with it…sort of, but what is more interesting is his observations about how much of  a bunch of sooks and blouses we have become.

When I went to school over 30 years ago the norm was to walk, cycle or take public transport. Similarly a colleague I spoke to yesterday said that when he went to school in Tauranga 20 years that there were hundreds of bike racks at his school and it was hard to find a place to park his bike. And I talked last night to someone from Hawkes Bay, and when she went to primary school a little over 10 years ago cycling was the norm as well.

But there has been a dramatic shift to little children being dropped off by their mummies (that’s how we would have cruelly described it at school) over the last 20 years. And the result of the critical mass shifting is that it’s now deemed too dangerous for kids to cycle or walk to school. But a lot of that perceived or real danger is the very traffic caused by those car driving mummies.

It’s a vicious circle, exemplified by another conversation yesterday with someone who firstly talked about how she used to cycle in Auckland, then about how cycling in Auckland became too dangerous because of the cars and poor infrastructure, and then about how cyclists in Auckland are painful and dangerous when she drives her car. I struggled to get her to understand the causes and effects.

We need to break this circle of despair, and get people back onto the streets, walking and cycling. We are seeing this start in some cities, Wellington especially, and successes in Auckland with multi-use areas like Fort Lane and Elliot Street. The end game is that New Zealand has vibrant walkable, liveable cities, with incredible people-filled street life and places to live that attract and retain the best talent.

So it’s great to see the Greens today launched a cycling to school policy. It’s a clever start.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Man loses 16kg and lowers his cholesterol by a third after eating only McDonald’s for three months

That’s the sort of diet Pete should try out. I hear he’s a Maccas addict.

Contrary to popular belief, following a diet of exclusively fast food does not necessarily lead to weight gain, as one man recently discovered.

John Cisna, a high school biology teacher from Ankeny, Iowa, told KCCI that he documented the changes his body underwent throughout the three months that he ate nothing but McDonald’s – with very surprising results.

Rather than his body deteriorating like the star of 2004 documentary Super Size Me, Mr Cisna lost an impressive 37lbs and saw his cholesterol drop from 249 to 170, improving his health significantly

How did he do it?   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Now we are talking, a pill to replace exercise

Scientists may have found out how to put a workout in a pill. Now we are talking.

Earlier this week in the journal Nature Medicine researchers at the Scripps Institute in Florida suggested that we are closer than ever to attaining this goal. They found that mice injected with a protein called REV-ERB underwent physiological changes usually associated with exercise, including increased metabolic rates and weight loss. Even obese, inactive mice experienced these changes.

Apparently American, and most probably Kiwis lie about taking 2 hours per week to exercise. if true though, and we really did exercise for two hours per week imagine the benefits of such a pill.

The exercise pill would help on multiple fronts. First, just think what we could do with an extra two hours per week. We would finally have the time to sit down and phone an old friend, take another shot at those scrapbooks, or get that bathroom repainted. Time really is money, and getting those two hours back would count for a lot.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

How to Pick Up a Woman at the Gym

Essential information for blokes:

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Perhaps Tolley could look at this

Springwise.com

Here is an idea for Anne Tolley to consider. It is great idea for low risk offenders in NZ. High risk offenders should just have this as part of their punishment.

The Greens should be all for this one!

Film lovers in the UK have already experienced screenings projected the environmentally friendly way with the pedal-powered Cycle-in Cinema. In Brazil, the Santa Rita do Sapucaí prison has taken a similar approach in its attempts to produce green energy – harnessing the pedal work of its inmates.

According to reports, two exercise bikes have been placed in the courtyard of the penitentiary and are hooked up to batteries. Cyclists’ kinetic energy is converted into electricity which charges the battery and a device on the handlebars alerts the rider when it’s time stop. The fully charged batteries are then taken into the city and used to power street lamps – one day’s cycling can provide enough energy to run six light bulbs. On a mass scale, the country’s prisoners could be a source of alternative energy for illuminating a city’s worth of street lights. In order to incentivize use of the bikes, city judge José Henrique Mallmann is waiving a day off the sentence of prisoners for every 16 hours pedalling they complete. The facility aims to install a further eight bikes following the success of the scheme.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Waste of time

Sydney Morning Herald

It seems that two sporting shibboleths have been slain. Cold Water Immersion and Stretching:

Dr Shane Brun, an associate professor of musculoskeletal and sports medicine at James Cook University: “There’s not a lot of evidence so far that cold water immersion does a lot for physical benefits of people using it.” And even then he was only just warming up!

Dr Brun again: “The physical evidence suggests stretching does not do much to help the body recover … “

My idea of warming up is a couple of mags down range to take the chill off.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Labour now supports cycleways?

It would appear that Labour now supports cycleways?

“Labour will promote the development of new outdoor recreational opportunities, for example, walking and cycling trails on former railways land.”

Also of note is that Labour’s sport and recreation policy is three times as long as its education policy.

And contains more unfunded promises….

  • Resources, training, and ‘capacity building’
  • Upgrading huts, tracks and other visitor facilities, including in the back country
  • Practical support  for schools and clubs with resources and training
  • Investment in sport at the grassroots level
  • Invest in community sport and recreation
  • Investing in developing the skills of sports volunteers

Their whole policy is flim flam.
They use the words “investigate” and “promote” a lot, sounds like a shit load of reports by fat arsed bureaucrats and some signs saying “cycle here” and “play there”.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.