failure

Social justice warrior doesn’t deliver but keeps the money

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Social justice warrior and feminist @KivaBay Kiva Smith-Pearson started a crowdfunding campaign so that she could produce a feminist deck of cards. Social justice warriors everywhere enthusiastically backed her project. In no time at all she had met her financial goal, which she had told them was enough to produce the cards. The updates on how the project were going soon trickled to a halt  and a couple of backers showed concern.

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If you agree with me that’s nice, but what I really want to achieve is to make you question the status quo, look between the lines and do your own research. Do not be a passive observer in this game we call life.

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To read my previous articles click on my name in blue.

Photo Of The Day

The Return of the Sun "Extremely heavy precipitation of rime crystals during the night, our rigging being heavily encrusted some of the ropes being over 3" in diameter, but the effect is beautiful" Hurley Diary. Shackleton aimed to make the first-ever land crossing of the Antarctic continent, but his ship became trapped, then crushed and sunk, by ice before the team could reach their starting point for the trek. Imperial Trans-Antarctic Expedition, 1914-17, led by Ernest Shackleton. (Photo by Frank Hurley/Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge/Getty Images)

The Return of the Sun “Extremely heavy precipitation of rime crystals during the night, our rigging being heavily encrusted some of the ropes being over 3″ in diameter, but the effect is beautiful”.  Photo by Frank Hurley/Scott Polar Research Institute, University of Cambridge/Getty Images.

The Endurance

Survival Against the Greatest Odds

When Antarctica’s hulking glacial landmass—icy and inhospitable—was spotted by 18th century British Captain James Cook, he remarked:

“I make bold to declare that the world will derive no benefit from it.”

 That proclamation did not ward away future journeys, though.

One hundred years ago, one of the most astounding tales of survival began aboard a small wooden ship with 28 men trapped in Antarctic ice.

A year and a half later, in August 1916, the details of Sir Ernest Shackleton’s ordeal emerged — a story of a spectacular, yet triumphant, failure.

For the second time, Shackleton had failed to achieve his goal of reaching the South Pole. Yet, with his ship crushed, his men camped on ice floes and then marooned on a barren island, he managed to sail 800 nautical miles (1,475 kilometres) in a small boat, in winter, to get help. Not a single life was lost, cementing his reputation as a man of boundless courage and one of the greatest leaders of all time.

Shackleton set sail on Aug. 1, 1914, the day England declared war on Germany. The British Admiralty let him go, expecting the war to be over by Christmas. When Shackleton returned, the world no longer cared about gentlemen adventurers and their polar dalliances. It seemed trivial when set against death on an unimaginable scale on the battlefields of Europe.

Shackleton was naturally gifted in the traits that make leaders. Much of it for him was instinct.

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Bird mincer battery approved

Gareth Hughes of the Green Taliban will be soiling his hemp cloth nappies with excitement over the announcement that a battery of 286 native bird mincers has been granted resource consent approval to be built spanning 30,000 hectares to maximize its killing capacity in the Wairarapa.

Wairarapa could soon be home to New Zealand’s largest wind farm after Genesis Energy was granted resource consent to increase the size of its controversial mega-wind farm.

It has approval to build up to 286 turbines in the region at a cost of more than $1.6 billion.

Consents for Genesis’s proposed Castle Hill wind farm wereconfirmed by the Environment Court today, after appeals were lodged against the original consents granted in June last year for 267 turbines. It had originally applied to build 286 turbines, which has now been approved. – source  Read more »

Incomplete? More like failed

Yesterday I blogged about deadbeat degrees and the deadbeat jobs you get as a result…turns out that a “incomplete” BA gets you a job as an MP.

But it was pointed out to me today that you’d have to be a little desperate to claim a failed BA as a qualification … in fact I wasn’t aware the university would hand out an incomplete BA as a qualification.

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As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.