Fat Bastard Tax

Fat bastard should be charged for being disgusting and fat

A US nail salon has introduced a surcharge for overweight people, explaining the extra cost as “service fees”.

The Memphis salon Rose Nails said the usually $30 pedicure would be $45 for larger customers, the Daily Mail reported. Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Real life implementation of a fat bastard tax

The aisle seat is the preferred location for fat bastard seats.

The aisle seat is the preferred location for fat bastard seats.

I’ve long advocated for a fat bastard tax, a tax that only fat bastards pay.

This is instead of broad brush taxes that advocates say are needed to address obesity. Since no one forces fat bastards to eat mountains of food it seems sensible to charge the people with the problem and call it a fat bastard tax.

Hawaiian Airlines has now introduced their own version of a fat bastard tax:

Hawaiian Airlines has won the right to weigh people before they board their planes.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Winston thinks there are more voters among smokers than fat bastards

winstonno

NZ First leader Winston Peters has hit out at the rising price of tobacco as taxes are increased under the latest budget, saying obesity should be looked at first.

“Hiking tobacco taxes in the budget is just a lot of fat people sitting in their ivory towers telling smokers what to do.”

Mr Peters said the new taxes were making smokers feel “guilty”, and unfairly targeting them.

“The Government is ignoring the huge health problems we have with obesity and is picking on low-income people again – people who are not allowed to have any freedom to enjoy something that is legal without being hit hard in the pocket and made to feel guilty.

“This has nothing to do with supporting smoking; it’s about fairness and speaking up for people’s personal freedom.”

So what does Winston want to do?  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Apparently a NZ sugar tax is coming

Boyd Swindleburn

Boyd Swindleburn

According to Professor Boyd Swinburn a sugar fat bastard tax is inevitable, just not under a National Government.

Appearing on Paul Henry to discuss what is needed to stop child obesity in New Zealand, Boyd Swinburn is still whinging on about a letter he sent to the government months ago calling on a sugar fat bastard tax.

Sadly, Boyd Swinburn and his followers are upset that his theoretical modelling efforts aren’t being noticed. The usual line of taxes worked for tobacco therefore it must work for sugar, is another line not being swallowed by government.

And not surprisingly.

Even arts, travel and lifestyle blogger David Farrar has taken the call for a sugar tax to task.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Health trougher wants to save fat bastards by taxing us all

Robyn Toomath is a health trougher and a socialist. She hasn’t yet met a tax that she doesn’t like.

She appeared on Sunday last night re-iterating what she has written on her blog.

If you stop and ask people on the street, nine out of ten (including the overweight ones) will say that you get fat from over-eating and its no-one’s fault but your own. This is not just due to imperfect understanding of geno-environmental interactions, but because the notions of autonomy and self-control are deeply held (1). So when nihilistic biologists such as myself suggest there is no such thing as free will, it’s not just the libertarians but liberal intellectuals who are offended.

I need to remind myself of this tension between free will and socially determined arguments when I feel frustrated at the persistent framing of obesity as an issue of personal responsibility. But no matter how appealing the idea that we can change our body size if we choose to, the reality is that we can’t. At least, not most of us, and not permanently. Professor Sir Peter Gluckman, the Prime Minister’s Chief Science Advisor (and obesity expert), said in a recent speech that over his life time he has lost about 100kg in weight, and put about 95kg back on (2). If motivation and education were the keys to staying slim Sir Peter should be as thin as a rake (he’s not).

It’s all very well maintaining a fantasy if it makes us feel better but the personal responsibility myth causes great harm.

Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Time for a fat-bastard tax

Fat-Cat-Meme2

Forget sugar taxes, fat taxes or anything else based on ingredients. We should be taxing the fatty not the food the fatty scoffs.

Kiwis are porky and dangerously deluded about it, a new study has found.

While we might tout ourselves as a sports-mad nation, the reality is most of us are hopelessly inactive.

According to a study comparing 11 countries, Kiwis were not only the chubbiest, but were “wildly off the mark” in estimating how fat they were.

While six in 10 were overweight or obese, most thought only 45 per cent of us fitted that description, independent research for the annual Cigna 360° Wellbeing Score found.

Health and nutrition experts are not surprised. “I think it’s normal to be overweight now,” New Zealand Nutrition Foundation dietitian Sarah Hanrahan said.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

CLAIM: Fat chicks as big a threat as terrorism

Terrorist in training

Terrorist in training

The UK’s Chief Medical Officer says the obesity threat for fat chicks is as big a risk as terrorism.

Obesity poses as big a risk to the nation as terrorism, says the Chief Medical Officer.

Dame Sally Davies wants the obesity crisis in women to be classed alongside flooding and major outbreaks of disease – as well as the threat from violent extremism.

Her extraordinary claim comes as she warns today that being overweight affects all stages of women’s lives – including in the womb.

It may lead them to being teased as teenagers, having higher-risk pregnancies and possibly developing breast cancer or heart disease after the menopause.   Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Wonder no more why we are becoming a nation of fat bastards

Forget a sugar tax, or a fat tax, the reason why we are becoming a nation of fat bastards is quite simply because we are lazy.

A global study on physical activity has “staggered” its New Zealand researcher with findings that show Kiwis are less active than Americans, and on par with Iraqis for regular exercise.

AUT professor of physical activity Erica Hinckson said news New Zealand ranked 88th out of 110 nations for physical activity was a surprise even to her.

“I was hoping we would be further up the list.”

The data, from the Global Observatory for Physical Activity, revealed New Zealand women came in even lower than men when it came to reaching 150 minutes a week of moderate to vigorous physical activity.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

Cry Baby of the Week

1448409981770

Some people really lack self awareness of their situation.

Take Blenheim man Kevin Williams who at 51 years of age weighs 230kgs and is blaming the government for his predicament and his lack of suitable housing.

He has run off to the Media Party for a bit of shaming.

Blenheim man Kevin Williams is 51 years old and living in a rest home.

He was forced into a home four years ago after his weight shot up to 300 kilograms and he developed type two diabetes.

He was no longer able to care for himself and had to start using a mobility scooter.

Shot up? Like overnight? That is some impressive eating to get yourself to 300kgs. But it wasn’t his fault you know…it was the takeaways…leaping out of the shop and into his gaping maw.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.

See…fat bastards can afford a Fat Bastard Tax

I’ve suggested that instead of sugar taxes, or fat taxes that we instead implement a fat bastard tax, where the tax is levied against the fat bastard directly.

There were concerns over ability to pay such a tax but new research suggests that fat bastards…well male fat bastards actually…could afford such a tax.

The size of your waistline may affect your weekly pay cheque. Larger men have been found to earn more, while larger women earn less than their trimmer counterparts.

Otago University’s Christchurch Health and Development study discovered obese men with a body mass index (BMI) of more than 30 earn on average $140 a week more than men with a normal BMI.

Obese women earn on average $60 less than those with normal BMI.    Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story. When he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet. Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet and, as a result, he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist who takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him, you can’t ignore him.

To read Cam’s previous articles click on his name in blue.