Film

Photo Of The Day

Copyright: Psycho (1960) © Universal Studios. 1965 Italian photobusta poster for Psycho.

Copyright: Psycho (1960) © Universal Studios. 1965 Italian photobusta poster for Psycho.

Psycho (1960)

Norman says of his mother, “She needs me. It’s not as if she were a maniac, a raving thing. She just goes a little mad sometimes. We all go a little mad sometimes. Haven’t you?”

Phoenix office worker Marion Crane is fed up with the way life has treated her. She has to meet her lover Sam in lunch breaks and they cannot get married because Sam has to give most of his money away in alimony. One Friday Marion is trusted to bank $40,000 by her employer. Seeing the opportunity to take the money and start a new life, Marion leaves town and heads towards Sam’s California store. Tired after the long drive and caught in a storm, she gets off the main highway and pulls into The Bates Motel. The motel is managed by a quiet young man called Norman who seems to be dominated by his mother.

When it was released in 1960, Psycho was one of the most controversial films of the day, thanks in part to the surprising (for the time) depictions of violence and sexuality it contained. In an effort to keep spoilers to a minimum and thus ensure audiences were as surprised as possible by the film’s more shocking twists and scenes, Hitchcock went to some rather extreme lengths to keep the film’s basic plot a secret.

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Never listen to unionists, especially Helen Kelly

Helen Kelly vehemently opposed the filming of The Hobbit in New Zealand.

She nearly got her way with her henchmen from Australia.

But, over 300,000 visitors went to Matamata last year as a result of the Hobbit movies.

Matamata’s Hobbiton movie set last night hosted a group of international cruise customers accompanied by some Hobbit cast and crew.

Crystal Cruises chose Hobbiton to host its 25th anniversary celebrations for 500-plus clientele, with organisers hoping it will help put New Zealand on the world stage.

Hobbit actors Mark Hadlow, John Callen, Jed Brophy and Peter Hambleton mingled with the passengers on their guided 1.2km trek around the movie set.

Hobbiton has come a long way since it opened in December 2002 by hosting a half-full 12-seater van.    Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photographer- Ralph Crane/Time Inc owned. Black cats and their owners in line for audition and casting for "Tales of Terror". Hollywood California

Photographer- Ralph Crane/Time Inc owned.
Black cats and their owners in line for audition and casting for “Tales of Terror”. Hollywood California

Black Cat Auditions

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Photo Of The Day

Photograph by Ralph Crane for LIFE Magazine

Photograph by Ralph Crane for LIFE Magazine

The Real Jessica Rabbit

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Photo Of The Day

Yale Joel—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images LIFE WITH BATMAN

Yale Joel—Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
LIFE WITH BATMAN

Where Is a Superhero When You Need One?

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Face of the day

Keisha Castle-Hughes

Keisha Castle-Hughes

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Photo Of The Day

Unknown Source

Unknown Source

Charlie Chaplin on Wall Street in 1918

 

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And to think Labour and the unions didn’t want the movies here

I wonder if Helen Kelly or the political branch of the CTU would care to comment, that is the ones that aren’t holidaying after being back at work for two weeks.

The Hobbit movies have injected a massive boost into tourism.

Middle-earth marketing of New Zealand has spurred on “remarkable” growth in overseas tourism, new research says.

A report just released by the New Zealand Institute of Economic Research (NZIER) found that Hobbit-inspired marketing of New Zealand attractions had helped push the growth of the tourism industry beyond any projections.  Read more »

Bludging filmmaking ratbags still sticking their hands out

Subsidies are evil, no matter who gets them.

I fail to see why the tax breaks and law changes put in for The Hobbit weren’t able to flow through tot he rest of the economy. Surely if they are good for film-making then they are equally good for other industries.

Governments should not be in the business of picking winners…as generally they pick losers…or worse the private owners pocket the corporate welfare when they sell out.

The Herald has a story of cry-baby film-workers.

New Zealand’s high exchange rate going back several years has been a big factor in the pull-out by foreign studios.   Read more »

Hobbit Haters Will Hate This

The Labour party and the unions went out of their way to hate on The Hobbit.

To this day they accuse John Key of selling out our laws despite the massive benefits that have flowed as a result of the deal.

HOBBIT fans are helping New Zealand to a mini-tourism boom as they flock to the island country in search of locations used in the film.

Holiday arrivals for the first four months of this year were up 10 per cent compared with the same time last year following the first film in the trilogy’s release in December, International Visitor Arrivals data shows. More than 13 per cent of international visitors took in a Hobbit experience while in New Zealand, including group tours to film sites or visiting the Hobbiton set at Matamata, which gets more than 100,000 visitors each year.   Read more »