Fun Police

Another dopey idea from Doug Sellman

Doug Sellman seems to have the monopoly on dopey ideas. 

His latest mad rant is to call fast food an addiction.

Addiction expert and researcher Professor Doug Sellman is director of the National Addiction Centre in Christchurch.

He told Newshub the fast food industry thrives on people eating it more, and the moreishness of particular brands lies in the engineered combination of fat, sugar and salt in its products. These are all ingredients New Zealanders consume far too much of already.

“Fast food outlets facilitate overeating through convenience, low price and provision of energy-dense moreish food, and therefore are an important factor in the New Zealand population eating too much.

“Not everyone with food addiction is obese and not everyone with obesity has food addiction. However, in our experience there is a very strong relationship between the behaviour of food addiction and the medical condition of obesity.”

Prof Sellman says it is possible to become addicted to fast food.   Read more »

Are they going to enforce bag checks too?

The wowsers want to wreck Pasifika Festival by banning and enforcing a soft drink ban:

The country’s biggest celebration of Pacific culture will be held at Western Springs this weekend.

Fighting Sugar in Soft Drinks (FIZZ) founder Gerhard Sundborn, who called for the ban, said 25 percent of a child’s sugar intake was from sugary drinks.   Read more »

Phil Goff’s fun police start cutting down swings

Phil Goff has started the new year by rolling out the fun police and tasking them with cutting down kid’s swings.

Kiwis’ DIY resourcefulness is under threat from the Auckland Council, which is demanding the removal of children’s swings on street trees, in the name of safety and tree health.

Parents in Calgary St, Sandringham, are shocked to have been slapped with notices ordering them to dismantle swings – loved by children – outside their homes

But the council says it is responding to a complaint rather than running a city-wide crackdown on street swings.

Peter Lord was told by a card left by a council official last month that the replacement swing he had erected only weeks early for his three daughters, aged 8, 11 and 12, was in breach of the Public Safety and Nuisance Bylaw.

Read more »

The Fun Police are on the Prowl

Lock the office doors, hide your Melbourne Cup Sweep tickets, this is one of the 3 or 4 days in the year when Internal Affairs Inspectors get to do their righteous work.

No prizes over $500 and (how necessary is this!) you are not allowed to offer a firearm or vouchers for sexual services as an office sweepstake prize.

$1,000 fine if you’re caught.  Spoilsports.

It’s the horse race that brings two nations to a standstill and sends novice punters into a frenzied flutter.

Armies of Kiwi office workers will this afternoon down pens for the annual Melbourne Cup race and obligatory office sweepstake.

Melbourne Cup frivolities attract many Kiwis usually averse to the sport and unaccustomed to placing a bet.

Cup day, celebrated as a public holiday in most of Victoria, is the single biggest betting day for the TAB in New Zealand. It also turns thousands of workers into makeshift bookies as workplaces join in the fun by offering an office sweepstake.

However, the Department of Internal Affairs warns that office sweepstake prize money cannot exceed $500 and those who breach the rules could face the long arm of the law.

This means tickets for the 24-horse race can cost no more than $20.83, according to a spokesman.

Any money raised must be returned as prizes and no one is allowed to profit from organising the sweepstake.

Violating these regulations could incur a fine of up to $1000.