German submarines

Photo of the Day

P-51 Mustang on fire after sabotaged fuel pump ignited. "Personnel from Sarasota Army Air Field hose down a P-51 Mustang that was returned to base after catching fire while in flight. Base officials had directed the pilot to head for Sarasota Bay and ditch the aircraft, but the pilot insisted on returning the plane to base. Upon landing, the pilot jumped from the moving, flaming plane while base personnel extinguished the fire. Upon investigating the aircraft, North American Aviation technical representative Sherman Studer determined that one of the plane's fuel pumps had been sabotaged. According to Studer's recollections, the installing mechanic was later arrested, and he confessed to sabotaging this and 18 other P-51 Mustangs."

“Personnel from Sarasota Army Air Field hose down a P-51 Mustang that was returned to base after catching fire while in flight. Base officials had directed the pilot to head for Sarasota Bay and ditch the aircraft, but the pilot insisted on returning the plane to base. Upon landing, the pilot jumped from the moving, flaming plane while base personnel extinguished the fire. Upon investigating the aircraft, North American Aviation technical representative Sherman Studer determined that one of the plane’s fuel pumps had been sabotaged. According to Studer’s recollections, the installing mechanic was later arrested, and he confessed to sabotaging this and 18 other P-51 Mustangs.”

When the Nazis tried to Invade America

Normandy. Anzio. Guadalcanal. Okinawa. Those are some of the historic landing sites for World War II invasions, legendary names that should never be forgotten. But there were lesser landings, as well, such as at Amagansett, New York, and Ponte Verdra Beach, Florida. That’s right. There were at least two mini-landings in America, engineered by Germans, of course, not Allies.

With rare exception, American involvement in World War II was focused in Europe and the Pacific. Few acts of war took place on the North American continent, a function primarily of the United States’ geographic isolation. But this did not keep the Germans from attempting to bring the war Stateside. In fact, on June 13, 1942, four German operatives landed at Amagansett, New York, toward the eastern tip of Long Island.  Three days later, another four Nazis came ashore at Ponte Vedra Beach, Florida, just south of Jacksonville.

Their orders? To wreak havoc on America’s infrastructure.

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