Hinekawa Topia

Ta Moko cartoon: Whaleoil reader is offended [guest post]

133233fb-6e7e-4385-952e-ff9a8b99bafc

I’m seriously offended, and as offence can only be taken, not given, I decided to sit and think about it.

I’m offended over the reaction from the Ta Moko cartoons depicting a little Maori boy beaten with visible bruising. Not the cartoon itself, it’s quite factual, and I maintain if it was depicting a little Pakeha boy, or an Asian boy, or even a Jewish boy, it would be okay, or those communities would accept it and move on even though statistically, they are 4 times less to be the subject of family violence than a Maori, or 3 times less than a PI child.

Naida Glavish is a prominent Maori woman, and holds a lot of Mana within Maori, she COULD be an effective change agent, if she stood up and championed change instead of taking offence. Or, could she be offended mainly as she has been the subject of things in Whaleoil previously? My belief is she really needs to sit down and look at the real problem, that the main group of people or communities committing these violent offences are still in DENIAL, and instead of accepting there is an issue and doing something about it, she and many like her run out and decide to take a fence. Surround themselves with a shield, ignore, bury their heads and claim there is nothing wrong, and don’t you dare single out my community/culture, that’s racist. I wonder how many of the abused children, the ones who were killed, do they think its racist, was their abuse and murder racist?   

I’m also offended by the Human Rights (Wrongs) commission, they are simply adding fuel to the fire, instead of coming out with the truth the rest of NZers already know and understand, and what is a massive thorn in NZ’s side on the international stage, they often side with the offended, and give them another reason to ignore the stats, the violence and the abuse of children. By siding with the perpetually offended, they are enabling the very abuse and violence that is so deeply rooted in those communities and cultures.    

When you break it down, the role of the Human Rights Commission is to set and to keep standards for ALL Kiwis, all means ALL, not just the leaders or the offended from certain communities or cultures, so I ask the Human Rights Commission, who stood up for the following children’s human rights, and who will stand up for the other kids who are being violently abused, murdered, deprived, and so on, who will stand up for their human rights, as currently, their parents and caregivers and collective communities are not, they seem to have adopted a silence on domestic violence, and especially of violence against children: Read more »

Unforgivable

This kind of crime is beyond any forgiveness or explanation and should not be buried in blather about poverty, colonialism or whatever.

It is imperative that the many decent leaders in the Maori community put an end to this frightful behaviour.

There are no excuses.

The father of a 2-month-old triplet who died in January last year has admitted murdering her.

Thomas Tamatea Ariki-Nui McGregor appeared in the High Court at Wanganui today facing seven charges and pleaded guilty to murdering his daughter Hinekawa Topia on January 12, 2012.  Read more »

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

Cuddling Corpses for political gain, Ctd

Yesterday it was Grant Robertson that jumped on the death of an indigent man to score a political point about “poverty”.

This morning it is Jacinda Ardern who is cuddling corpses to score political points.

Labour has reiterated its call for a cross-party approach to fighting child abuse following the death of two-month-old Hinekawa Topia.

…Labour’s social development spokeswoman Jacinda Ardern said she did not want to comment specifically on Hinekawa’s case while the investigation was continuing, but speaking broadly about the issue of child abuse, she reiterated Labour’s call for more cooperation across Parliament to tackle the problem.

“We know that our child abuse stats in New Zealand are appalling, we know we have an enormous issue that we need to be dealing with. I don’t believe we need another inquiry to tell us what we already know, we need action.”

The Government announced last year that it would set up a ministerial committee to look at the issue of child poverty, and Ms Ardern said with poverty and abuse being so inter-linked, the group could be an opportunity for parties to work together.

“We’ve asked the Government to allow us to be a part of that group … as yet the Government hasn’t taken us up on that offer but we’ll keep making it,” Ms Ardern said.

Labour doesn’t want to talk about the individual case, they simply want to use the case for an excuse to try and embarrass the government into let them come along in a “me too” capacity on a committee. That isn’t going to address the issue of Maori killing their kids now is it?

Labour really are shameless. They don’t care about the issues, they are simply trying to score points against the government. In doing so though they are trying to lay the blame of child murders at their feet which is shameless politicking using dead people.

Enhanced by Zemanta

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.

Cue more wailing

I’m waiting for all the wailing to start about how NZ society as a whole has a problem with killing kids, when it is apparent that it is actually only one part of our society that has the problem:

Police have launched a homicide investigation after the death of a two-month old baby girl in Whanganui.

Detective Senior Sergeant Neil Forlong said the baby, Hinekawa Topia, was driven to Whanganui Hospital by her parents just before 1pm on Thursday.

She was not breathing and attempts by her father and hospital staff to resuscitate her were unsuccessful.

A post mortem had concluded that a head injury suffered by Hinekawa was considered non-accidental, he said.

Hinekawa was one of triplets and the two other babies, both girls, were in hospital to be medically assessed and in the interim custody of Child Youth and Family, along with a five year-old boy.

As much at home writing editorials as being the subject of them, Cam has won awards, including the Canon Media Award for his work on the Len Brown/Bevan Chuang story.  And when he’s not creating the news, he tends to be in it, with protagonists using the courts, media and social media to deliver financial as well as death threats.

They say that news is something that someone, somewhere, wants kept quiet.   Cam Slater doesn’t do quiet, and as a result he is a polarising, controversial but highly effective journalist that takes no prisoners.

He is fearless in his pursuit of a story.

Love him or loathe him.  But you can’t ignore him.