hospital

How am I feeling?

I thought as it is nearly the end of January I’d give you an update on how I am feeling and what has happened since December 26.

After we returned from our Boxing Day lunch with the outlaws, a day where I spent most of it lying on a couch taking Panadol for a stonking headache, I went into my office to prepare posts for the blog for the next day.

At about 9 pm I came out to grab a drink and SB called to me and asked what had happened. I said “nothing, why?”She told me to look in the mirror and set about furiously googling stuff.

My face, on the right-hand side, had slumped, and I couldn’t move it. I couldn’t raise my eyebrows, smile, grin, or even grimace. Half of my face was paralysed and it became more apparent when I couldn’t drink out of a glass because it spilt out of my half paralysed mouth.

SB thought I might be having a stroke, to me, it looked like Bells Palsy, Mum had it many years ago. I still had a bad headache, but after the standard stroke tests, I decided to sleep on it and see how I was in the morning, given if it was Bells palsy then there was nothing I could do anyway.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

First claim: In an interview to be with CBS', Charles Cullen at first says he thought he was helping people by ending their suffering.

First claim: In an interview, Charles Cullen at first says he thought he was helping people by ending their suffering.

The Tainted Kidney

Charles Edmund Cullen (born February 22, 1960) is a former nurse who is the most prolific serial killer in New Jersey history and is suspected to be the most prolific serial killer in American history. He confessed to authorities that he killed up to 40 patients during the course of his 16-year nursing career. But in subsequent interviews with police, psychiatric professionals, and journalists Charles Graeber and Steve Kroft, it became clear that he had killed many more, whom he could not specifically remember by name, though he could often remember details of their case. Experts have estimated that Charles Cullen may ultimately be responsible for over 300 deaths, which would make him the most prolific serial killer in American history

Cullen, is serving eighteen consecutive life sentences in a New Jersey penitentiary. Behind bars, he can no longer take life, yet he’s found a way to give it—in the form of an organ transplant. But no one wants to give him the chance to play God again.

The Angel of Death looks sleepy. His face shows nothing. His eyes are closed. Charles Cullen sits motionless in the wooden defendant’s chair of the Somerset County Courthouse as, hour after hour, his victims’ families take the stand. They read poems and show photographs, they weep and yell. If Cullen hears them, he doesn’t say; he never does. During his years in custody, Cullen has never apologized or made excuses. He has never issued a statement, offered a public word, never faced the families of his victims. In fact, the only reason he’s in court today is because he wants to give away one of his kidneys.

To that end, he has cut a deal with prosecutors, agreeing to appear at his sentencing on the condition that he be allowed to donate an organ to the dying relative of a former girlfriend. To many of the families of his victims, this deal is a personal insult—the man in shackles still calling the shots, the serial-killer nurse wanting to control the fate of yet another human life. But for the families of his New Jersey victims, this is the first and last chance to confront Charles Cullen. So they are here, and they are angry.

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Dunedin hospital food passes the Coleman Taste Test

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Jonathan Coleman went to Dunedin Hospital yesterday to taste the food that Andrew Little described as “slops” in parliament.

Frankly I am appalled that Andrew Little denigrated hard working, probably unionised, hospital catering staff without testing the food himself.

Jonathan Coleman did though…and he said it was yummy.

Health Minister Dr Jonathan Coleman has praised the ”standard Kiwi fare” he sampled at Dunedin Hospital today, and says there is ”nothing wrong” with the meals.

Dr Coleman took part in the taste test today due to pressure over the meals in recent days because of publicity about meals.

He ate bolognese and pasta, a sandwich, and soup, and enjoyed them all.

Dr Coleman suggested people needed to adjust their expectations about what to expect when they are in hospital.   Read more »

Photo Of The Day

Photo: New Zealand Archives. Nursing Staff In Front of Seacliff Lunatic Asylum.

Photo: New Zealand Archives.
Nursing Staff In Front of Seacliff Lunatic Asylum.

Raging Inferno

Shockingly Sudden

No Chance to Rescue

 Lunacy and troubles of the mind have never been easy topics. The early days in the colony of New Zealand saw gaols as the repository for society’s misfits. Lunatics took their place alongside military deserters, convicts, delinquents, debtors, drunkards, vagrants and prostitutes.

Early gaolers apparently tolerated lunatics. There is no reported instance of the mentally disturbed being punished while in gaol. Those who became violent were restrained by irons, fetters and occasionally straight-jackets. However, the imposition of the insane on the prison system was seen as unsatisfactory, leading to demands for separate housing and proper treatment for those of troubled mind. Prior to the 1870s, asylum-keepers noted that nothing could be done for many patients, except to watch them ‘at the full of the moon’. Humoral treatment (relating to the four bodily fluids) was still in vogue, as were techniques like head-shaving and bowel control.

The solution was the development of rural asylums, of which Seacliff was to be the largest and grandest. This afforded the removal of the disturbed from the purview of society, with their incarceration in the country away from prying eyes. The further appeal was undoubtedly the measure of self-sufficiency, achieved through institutional farming, which offered both employment of the (unpaid) inmates and provision of food from the asylum farm, all of which helped keep costs under control.

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Photo Of The Day

Iron Lung Ward

Medical personnel tend to Polio Victims in an “Iron Lung Ward” during a 1950s epidemic; Haynes Memorial Hospital; Boston, MA; 1955.

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Photo Of The Day

Photo by Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images Casey and Jean Kasem Jean was known to adopt an eccentric fashion sense that earned her repeat mentions on various worst-dressed lists.

Photo by Time & Life Pictures/Getty Images
Casey and Jean Kasem
Jean was known to adopt an eccentric fashion sense that earned her repeat mentions on various worst-dressed lists.

Casey Kasem

 The Original Voice Of the American Top 40 Countdown Has Died

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Empathy